Uber driver’s good deed: Action should be praised, not punished

When an allegedly drunken driver hit several vehicles and then a building, Uber driver Ian Kelley was among those who chased down the fellow.

No good deed goes unpunished, the saying goes. It seems to be true in the case of the Seacoast man who helped prevent serious injury or death New Year’s weekend.

When an allegedly drunken driver hit several vehicles and then a building, Uber driver Ian Kelley was among those who chased down the fellow. Kelley then prevented the man from leaving the scene when he pulled his handgun and ordered the fellow to stay right where he was.

“I think this good Samaritan’s actions definitely stopped further damage and probably averted a tragedy,” Lt. Timothy McCain, of the Portsmouth Police Department, told WMUR-TV.

Uber, alas, has a “zero tolerance’’ policy. It has little tolerance for contracted drivers who carry any firearms. Kelley was suspended.

We think Uber’s policy is wrong-headed, especially given the nature of the work. But we were happy to see that the suspension was temporary and lifted quickly. That may have been done simply for PR purposes, but it was done and that’s good.

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