SpaceX launches Falcon 9 rocket to the International Space Station on Star Wars Day

Falcon 9, which Elon Musk reportedly named after the iconic Millennium Falcon from Star Wars, blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

The latest headlines in your inbox

The latest headlines in your inbox

SpaceX launched a rocket loaded with supplies for the International Space Station on Star Wars Day.

Falcon 9, which Elon Musk reportedly named after the iconic Millennium Falcon from Star Wars, blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

SpaceX continued to tout the Star Wars Day connection as the craft blasted off.

“Dragon is now officially on the way to the space station,” the SpaceX launch commentator announced once the capsule reached orbit and its solar wings unfurled. “Until next time, May the Fourth be with you.”

The shipment is set to arrive on Monday

The Star Wars catchphrase is usually “may the force be with you”, with fans adapting it on May 4.

​The rocket raced into the pre-dawn darkness, carrying a Dragon capsule with 2,500 kilograms of goods and is due to arrive at the orbiting lab Monday.

It set off from Cape Canaveral

Its booster streaked to a smooth landing on a recovery ship just offshore.

The delivery is a few days late because of electrical power shortages which emerged first at the space station then at SpaceX’s rocket-landing platform in the Atlantic.

It is the 17th shipment being delivered by SpaceX to the ISS

Both problems were quickly resolved with equipment replacements.

Minutes after liftoff, SpaceX landed its brand new first-stage booster on the ocean platform roughly 16 kilometres off the coast, considerably closer than usual with the sonic booms easily heard at the launch site.

“That looked really, really cool in the night sky,” said Hans Koenigsmann, a SpaceX vice president.

He had left his launch control seat to run outside and watch.

SpaceX has been restocking the space station since 2012 and this latest cargo Dragon, the company’s 17th shipment, is carrying equipment and experiments for the six space station astronauts, including an instrument to monitor carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere.

Comments

or to comment
Please be respectful when making a comment and adhere to our Community Guidelines.

Community Guidelines

  • You may not agree with our views, or other users’, but please respond to them respectfully
  • Swearing, personal abuse, racism, sexism, homophobia and other discriminatory or inciteful language is not acceptable
  • Do not impersonate other users or reveal private information about third parties
  • We reserve the right to delete inappropriate posts and ban offending users without notification

You can find our Community Guidelines in full here.

{{#singleComment}}{{value}} Comment{{/singleComment}}{{^singleComment}}{{value}} Comments{{/singleComment}}

  • RSS

{{^comments}}

There are no comments yet

{{/comments}} {{#comments}}

{{sender.name}}{{dateTime}}
{{{commentText}}}
Reply {{#sender.isSelf}} Delete {{/sender.isSelf}}
{{posVotes}}{{negVotes}}
{{#replies}}

{{sender.name}}{{dateTime}}
{{{commentText}}}
Reply {{#sender.isSelf}} Delete {{/sender.isSelf}}
{{posVotes}}{{negVotes}}
{{#replies}}

{{sender.name}}{{dateTime}}
{{{commentText}}}
{{#sender.isSelf}} Delete {{/sender.isSelf}}
{{posVotes}}{{negVotes}}

{{/replies}}

{{/replies}}

{{/comments}}

{{#showMore}} {{/showMore}}

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts