Donald Trump’s wall could run right through Elon Musk’s SpaceX launch site

President Donald Trump’s infamous border wall could run right through a launch site owned by Elon Musk’s SpaceX. The billionaire’s firm owns a …

President Donald Trump’s infamous border wall could be built right through a launch site owned by Elon Musk’s SpaceX.

The billionaire’s firm owns a 50-acre patch of land near Boca Chica, Texas, and the current planned route of the fence shows it running across one of its launchpads.

‘This issue with SpaceX is that the fence cuts right through their property and that’s a problem,’Democratt Representative Lucille Roybal-Allard told Bloomberg.

Now it’s hoped Musk and Trump will come to some sort of agreement rather than kicking off the biggest fence dispute in the history of humanity.

Trump in front of a prototype of the border wall (Photo: AFP)

‘The Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Customs and Border Protection recently requested SpaceX permit access to our South Texas Launch site to conduct a site survey,’ SpaceX said in a statement.

‘At this time, SpaceX is evaluating the request and is in communication with DHS to further understand their plans.’

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Donald Trump is set to declare a national emergency to get funding for his wall across the US-Mexico border, the White House Press Secretary revealed today.

The US President is due to sign a border security bill to avert a government shutdown and also take ‘other executive action’, Sarah Sanders said.

She continued: ‘The President is once again delivering on his promise to build the wall, protect the border, and secure our great country.’

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Ski gear company RENOUN creates high-tech skis for Elon Musk

As a company centered around innovation, the high-tech ski company RENOUN has a perpetual soft spot for Elon Musk and the companies he’s …

As a company centered around innovation, the high-tech ski company RENOUN has a perpetual soft spot for Elon Musk and the companies he’s created.

RENOUN always felt someone like a real-life Iron Man should be on a pair of skis with futuristic technology—so they made him some.

RENOUN has been hunting him down for the last three years and just shipped Musk his skis: a 1-of-1 pair design in iconic Tesla Red based off the original Endurance design. It’s the company’s “thank you” to one of the grittiest and most determined men of this century—and one who’s bound to change it.

Under the hood, the skis are also unique, just like a Tesla. All RENOUN skis incorporate HDT—a material that makes the skis feel stiffer as speeds increase, which make for smooth and controlled skis. They essentially adapt on the fly to conditions.

The technology used to create the skis has won RENOUN more awards than they have full-time employees.

The skis for Musk have RENOUN’s tagline “Rules are meant to be broken” and a small note printed on the ski that says: “for the man daring to break more than a few rules”.

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“The guy is a badass and he deserves badass skis,” said RENOUN Founder Cyrus Schenck.

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‘Ofigenno’. Elon Musk tweets in Russian

Word-known businessman Ilan Musk replied in the Russian language to a tweet by the Kremlin-run TV station NTV.

Word-known businessman Ilan Musk replied in the Russian language to a tweet by the Kremlin-run TV station NTV.

хаха офигенно

— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) 13 февраля 2019 г.

“Haha awesome [ofigenno – in Russian],” Musk wrote under the video with the question ‘And how do you like this, @elonmusk?’

NTV published a video story of a driver from Stavropol Krai who customized his Lada car. The customization was so fine that even the founder of the SpaceX saw value in it.

The Internet meme ‘And how do you like this, @elonmusk?’ became very popular in the former Soviet countries. Netizens often use it when showing off stories and photos of devices and inventions on the web.

Catch up and outdo Musk: Belarus president test-drives Tesla car

belsat.eu

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Pentagon watchdog to review SpaceX’s certification to launch national security satellites

By Christian Davenport | The Washington Post. A Pentagon watchdog agency plans to review the certification the Air Force granted SpaceX to launch …

By Christian Davenport | The Washington Post

A Pentagon watchdog agency plans to review the certification the Air Force granted SpaceX to launch national security satellites, a key source of revenue for the company founded by Elon Musk.

The move comes three years after SpaceX and the Air Force settled a lawsuit that ultimately led to the Air Force granting the company the certification. SpaceX had argued that it should be given the right to compete against the United Launch Alliance, a joint venture of Lockheed Martin and Boeing, for the lucrative launch contracts. At the time, ULA held a virtual monopoly on the contracts for about a decade.

Bloomberg News first reported the inspector general’s review.

In a letter to the Air Force leaders, the Defense Department inspector general said that its “objective is to determine whether the U.S. Air Force complied with the Launch Services New Entrant Certification Guide when certifying the launch system design for the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle-class SpaceX Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy launch vehicles.”

A spokesman for the inspector general could not say what prompted the review. SpaceX did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

For years, SpaceX waged a high-profile campaign to be able to compete for the launch contracts, waging a David vs. Goliath war against two of the biggest military contractors in the world. Musk accused military officials of trying to curry favor with the ULA, which he said was trying to put him out of business. SpaceX also fought in court, saying it should be able to compete for the launches, which it had identified as a key revenue source.

Then-Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James appointed a former high-ranking Pentagon official to lead an independent review of the certification process, which she said at the time would explore whether there are “ways that we can streamline, speed it up, do things a little bit differently.”

For years, there has been a significant culture clash between SpaceX, the hard-charging company with a Silicon Valley ethos and the more bureaucratic Pentagon office. “There’s always tension there,” said a former senior defense official.

Finally, in 2015, the Air Force and SpaceX settled the lawsuit, and the Air Force granted SpaceX certification of its Falcon 9 rocket, allowing it to compete against ULA, the only other company that holds a certification. Since then, SpaceX has won several missions, and has completed one, the launch of a GPS satellite.

Given the value of the contract awards – single launches can be worth more than $100 million – “there is a lot of pressure,” said a former senior defense official. “It’s big business.”

Last year, the Air Force certified another of SpaceX’s rockets, the more powerful Falcon Heavy, which can lift even heavier payloads to orbit. It was certified after a single flight, meaning SpaceX would have been required to give the Air Force “a ton of data,” the official said. Still, “that probably did raise eyebrows,” the official said.

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Why Is SpaceX Falcon 9 Certification Under Review By Pentagon?

The memo stated that a new evaluation is imperative to assess whether the Air Force’s previous certification of SpaceX’s primary launch vehicles in …

The Pentagon’s decision to order a fresh review of the fitness of Space X Falcon launch vehicles has sprung a surprise. This was communicated to the Air Force on Monday via a memo signed by Michael Roark, deputy for intelligence and special program assessments at Pentagon.

The review will take place in February at the Space and Missile Systems Center in El Segundo, California.

Elon Musk owned SpaceX did not comment. Air Force spokesman Brigadier General Edward Thomas also made no comment.

Rationale of new evaluation

The memo stated that a new evaluation is imperative to assess whether the Air Force’s previous certification of SpaceX’s primary launch vehicles in 2015 fully conforms to the guidelines under Launch Services New Entrant Certification Guide.

“Our objective is to determine whether the U.S. Air Force complied with the Launch Services New Entrant Certification Guide when certifying the launch system design for the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle-class SpaceX Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy launch vehicles,” said the memo addressed to Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson.

It is still unclear what prompted a fresh evaluation.

Earlier certification after a legal fight

The Air Force certification in 2015 made Space X eligible to launch military satellites or payloads. It also made Space X a viable alternative to the established player, United Launch Alliance (ULA), a joint venture of Lockheed Martin Space Systems and Boeing.

But the certification to Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy was granted after two years of parleys and a paused legal battle. After the certification, SpaceX withdrew the lawsuit challenging the contracts of U.S. military satellite launches to the ULA alliance.

In December 2018, SpaceX rocket had a successful launch of the U.S. military navigation satellite from Cape Canaveral, Florida.

The review order comes at a time Space X is basking under the glory of its debut national security space mission . It was able to place the satellite at the desired orbit in less than two hours.
GettyImages-Elon MuskSpace X CEO Elon Musk near a Falcon 9 rocket to announce the Moon voyage of Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa at the headquarters on September 17, 2018 in Hawthorne, California. On Feb 11, Pentagon ordered a fresh review of the Air Force certification to SpaceX launch vehicles.Photo: DAVID MCNEW/AFP/Getty Images

Concerns of ULA

In this context, the concerns expressed by ULA on commercial launch industry players getting access to military space looks important.

John Elbon, COO of ULA, expressed anxiety over the risk faced by the US National Security Space apparatus by hiring commercial launch industry players into military space.

Speaking at the Von Braun Symposium in Huntsville in Alabama in Oct 2018, Elbon made some comments that were directed at SpaceX and Blue Origin, another launch provider.

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