4 Cards to Earn Miles Toward that 2021 Vacation

The card’s $95 annual fee also gets you a long list of travel protections that include trip cancellation/interruption insurance, primary rental car insurance, …

You could save over $1,000 with just one of these cards.

After a year filled with lockdowns and financial stress, 2020 has most of us itching to fly away from it all — and do it on a budget.

Luckily, airlines and airports have implemented a number of measures to make air travel safer in the age of COVID-19. American Airlines, United, JetBlue, Lufthansa, British Airways, and Hawaiian recently announced plans to offer pre-flight COVID-19 tests, and Tampa International Airport recently became the first airport to offer COVID-19 testing to all passengers.

As you open up to the idea of flying again, it’s worth saving travel rewards that can help you cover the cost. Here are four of the best travel credit cards that can help you earn up to $1,000 or more in travel rewards. You can fast-track that lavish 2021 vacation and stay under budget.

For a big sign-up bonus and trip insurance: Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

The Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card is widely recognized as a great starter card for anyone who wants to accumulate travel rewards. Now, a temporarily increased sign-up bonus has sweetened the pot: You’ll get 80,000 points if you spend $4,000 in three months. This is worth at least $1,000 in travel spending, making it one of the most lucrative cards out there right now.

You’ll earn double points on travel and dining. The card’s $95 annual fee also gets you a long list of travel protections that include trip cancellation/interruption insurance, primary rental car insurance, and baggage delay insurance.

For a versatile, everyday travel card: Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card

If you prefer a flat-rate card that earns big on all your spending, the Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card is a great choice. You’ll get 2 miles on all your purchases, regardless of spending category. This card has also temporarily increased its sign-up bonus. You’ll earn 100,000 bonus miles if you can spend $20,000 in the first year. Even if you can’t, you can still earn 50,000 bonus miles for spending $3,000 in the first three months.

The miles you earn with this card are extremely flexible. They aren’t worth quite as much as Chase Ultimate Rewards, but you can use Venture miles to “erase” any purchase that codes as travel at a rate of $0.01 per point. Travel can cover everything from airfare and hotels to your Airbnb, train ticket, or amusement park tickets. This makes your miles very easy to use, and the 100,000-point welcome bonus worth $1,000 in travel spending — which more than covers the $95 annual fee.

For airport lounge access and travel credits: Chase Sapphire Reserve®

The Chase Sapphire Reserve® is the older sibling of the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card. This premium credit card is packed with perks and benefits that make travel cheaper, easier, and more luxurious. The sign-up bonus of 50,000 points if you spend $4,000 in three months is worth at least $750 in travel spending. You’ll also earn 3 points per $1 you spend on travel and dining.

It’s the bells and whistles that really make this card stand out. It comes with an annual travel credit of $300, complimentary airport lounge access, up to $120 in statement credits on DoorDash (a food delivery app) purchases, and some of the best travel insurance a credit card can offer. All of this can easily offset the $550 annual fee if you travel often.

For airline miles: Citi® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Elite Mastercard®

If you fly regularly with American Airlines, check out the Citi® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Elite Mastercard®. Right off the bat, you’ll earn 50,000 AAdvantage miles if you spend $2,500 in the first three months. You’ll also get 2 miles per $1 spent on restaurants, gas, and American Airlines. All in all, this is one of the best airline credit cards out there.

When you fly American Airlines, this card also gets you your first checked bag free on domestic itineraries, preferred boarding, and in-flight discounts. These benefits can easily offset the card’s $99 annual fee, which is waived for the first year.

Deal alert: No passport needed for warm US beaches from $42 round trip nonstop

Sign up for the free daily TPG newsletter for more travel tips … (SFO) to Maui (OGG) for $257 round trip nonstop in January on Hawaiian Airlines: …

This year, many countries that normally maintain open borders have restricted international travel due to the coronavirus pandemic. Fortunately, 2020 has proven to be a great time to fall back in love with domestic destinations, particularly ones that can be reached by car.

But if you aren’t the driving type, flights to beach cities may be just the ticket for you. With health safety protocols at an all-time high in commercial aviation, a quick weekend getaway for some Vitamin D might be in order before winter sets in. All of the destinations we searched don’t require passports from U.S. travelers, even if some destinations such as Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Hawaii feel like exotic escapes.

The lowest fares we’ve found originate from Newark (EWR) and fly nonstop into Fort Lauderdale (FLL) for just $43 round trip on Spirit, or $51 on United in basic economy — cheaper than a good steak after tax and tip.

Sign up for the free daily TPG newsletter for more travel tips

Some of these fares book into basic economy, which means different things to different airlines, but often means you may not have free use of the overhead bins for a carry-on bag. You probably also won’t be able to select your seat, get an upgrade or earn PQM/PQS/PQDs. Also, keep in mind that flights booked in basic economy may incur change fees despite many airlines eliminating most change fees on domestic and Caribbean/Mexico flights this summer. However, it’s possible to defeat some of basic economy’s negative aspects by having elite status or a cobranded credit card.

To find a deal, head to Google Flights and enter your origin and destination cities. Scroll through the calendar function to find dates and prices that work for you. Finally, click through to book directly with the airline or an OTA like Orbitz or Expedia.

Not sure how to utilize Google Flights to its fullest? Check out our guide to booking flights like a pro.

Airline: American, United, Spirit, Volaris, VivaAerobus and more

Routes: EWR/IAH/JFK/DFW/ATL/ORD and more to FLL/MIA/SJU/SAN/STT/STX

Cost: from $42 round trip in basic economy

Dates: October 2020 — June 2021

Pay With: The Platinum Card® from American Express (5x on airfare booked directly with the airline; starting Jan. 1, 2021 earn 5x points on up to $500,000 on these purchases per calendar year), Citi Prestige® Card (5x on airfare), Citi Premier® Card, Chase Sapphire Reserve (3x on airfare), American Express® Gold Card (3x on airfare when booked directly with the airline) or Chase Sapphire Preferred Card (2x on travel)

The information for the Citi Prestige Card and Citi Premier Card has been collected independently by The Points Guy. The card details on this page have not been reviewed or provided by the card issuer.

Here are some examples of specific flights that are available:

Newark (EWR) to Fort Lauderdale (FLL) for $42 round trip nonstop on Spirit via Google, or $51 on United in basic economy:

Newark (EWR) to San Juan, Puerto Rico (SJU) for $64 round trip nonstop on Spirit, or $67 on United in basic economy:

Chicago (ORD) to San Diego (SAN) for $96 nonstop round trip on American Airlines and United:

Dallas (DFW) to St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands (STT) for $164 round trip on Spirit:

Atlanta (ATL) to Key West (EYW) for $177 nonstop round trip on Delta:

San Francisco (SFO) to Maui (OGG) for $257 round trip nonstop in January on Hawaiian Airlines:

Maximize your purchase

Don’t forget to use a credit card that earns additional points on airfare purchases, such as The Platinum Card® from American Express (5x on airfare booked directly with the airline)(starting Jan. 21, 2021 earn 5x points on up to $500,000 on these purchases per calendar year), Citi Prestige Card (5x on airfare), Citi Premier Card, Chase Sapphire Reserve (3x on airfare), American Express® Gold Card (3x on airfare when booked directly with the airline) or Chase Sapphire Preferred Card (2x on travel). Check out this guide for more on maximizing airfare purchases.

Featured image by cdwheatley / Getty Images.

Chase 5/24 Rule: What You Need To Know (2020)

This is a page that’s part of Credit Karma’s older interface that isn’t otherwise accessible off the main site anymore, and it’s also the only part of the site …
In the interest of full disclosure, OMAAT earns a referral bonus for anyone that’s approved through some of the below links. These are the best publicly available offers (terms apply) that we have found for each product or service. Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of the bank, credit card issuer, airline, hotel chain, or product manufacturer/service provider, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Please check out our advertiser policy for further details about our partners, and thanks for your support!The offer for the IHG® Rewards Club Premier Credit Card has expired. Learn more about the current offers here.

The major banks have all kinds of rules when it comes to approving people for credit cards. Probably the most well known of these rules — and also the most complicated to understand — is the Chase 5/24 rule.

In this post I wanted to take a closer look at how exactly this rule works, how you can check your 5/24 “status,” and the best strategy to take when applying for Chase cards in light of this.

You’ll want to understand the Chase 5/24 rule if you plan on applying for one of Chase’s popular cards, like the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card or Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card.

In this post:

What is the Chase 5/24 rule?

The Chase 5/24 rule limits your ability to be approved for Chase credit cards, based on how many other cards you’ve applied for in the past two years. With the 5/24 rule, you typically won’t be approved for a Chase credit card if you’ve opened five or more new card accounts in the past 24 months.

Why does Chase have the 5/24 rule? Well, all credit card issuers have rules in place to attract new cardmembers. Given how generous sign-up bonuses are on many cards, they create certain rules and restrictions intended to encourage profitable consumer behavior.

While Chase has never publicly explained this, my assumption is that customers are more likely to be profitable if they fall under the 5/24 limit. Of course, there’s no perfect system, but it seems that Chase’s metrics suggest this is working, because the rule has been expanded significantly since it was first introduced several years ago.

Which cards are subjected to the Chase 5/24 rule?

Nowadays virtually all Chase cards are subjected to the 5/24 rule. When the Chase 5/24 rule was first introduced only certain cards were subjected to it, but in 2018 the rule was expanded to all Chase cards.

Some of Chase’s most popular personal credit cards (which are subjected to this rule) include the following:

Some of Chase’s most popular business credit cards (which are subjected to this rule) include the following:

Are business cards subjected to the Chase 5/24 rule?

This is a point that confuses people. As you understand by now, Chase’s 5/24 rule means that you won’t be approved for a Chase card if you’ve opened five or more new card accounts in the past 24 months.

There’s an exception, though — most business card applications (from Amex, Bank of America, Barclays, Chase, and Citi) don’t count towards the 5/24 limit. Why? Because business accounts opened with these issuers typically don’t show on your personal credit report.

However, if you want to be approved for a Chase business card, you’ll still need to be below the 5/24 limit, based on what’s counted.

To summarize:

  • Chase business cards are subjected to the 5/24 rule, meaning that you can’t be approved for them if five or more new card accounts show on your personal credit report in the past 24 months
  • When you do apply for a Chase business card, it won’t count as an additional card towards that limit (because it won’t show on your personal credit report)

In case that’s still confusing, let me give an example:

  • If you’re at 4/24 (based on four cards showing on your personal credit report) and you apply for a Chase business card, you’ll still be at 4/24
  • You could then apply for another Chase business card, and even if you’re approved for that, you’ll still be at 4/24
  • If you then apply for a Chase personal card, you’ll be at 5/24 (since the personal card shows on your personal credit report)

How do you check your Chase 5/24 status?

For some people it can be tough to determine if you’ve opened five or more new card accounts in the past 24 months. Furthermore, it’s not like Chase can tell you if you’re at the limit or not, given that the limit is based on your applications with all card issuers.

What’s the best way you can determine if you’ve surpassed the Chase 5/24 limit or not? My preferred way of looking it up is through Credit Karma. You can register for Credit Karma for free, which is an easy process.

You’ll just need to enter some personal information and then verify some security questions, all of which should take just a couple of minutes.

Once you’ve registered and are logged into your Credit Karma account, follow this link. This is a page that’s part of Credit Karma’s older interface that isn’t otherwise accessible off the main site anymore, and it’s also the only part of the site that will show you the accurate info you need.

This page will show your entire card history. On this page, click the “Open Date” button, which will sort all of these accounts based on when they were opened (if you push it twice you’ll see the most recent inquiries at the top, rather than at the bottom).

That will show you all the cards you’ve opened. For example, in my case, here are my most recent card openings:

  • I opened my most recent card on December 13, 2019
  • I opened my second most recent card on October 29, 2019
  • I opened my third most recent card on October 6, 2019
  • I opened my fourth most recent card on October 1, 2019
  • I opened my fifth most recent card on June 4, 2019

In other words, if I didn’t apply for any other cards, I would once again be under the 5/24 limit 24 months after June 4, 2019 (which puts me to June 2021).

It is worth noting that it can sometimes take a while for recent applications to show on your credit report, so if you’ve applied for a card in the past few weeks, it may not be on there yet.

Chase 5/24 rule FAQs

There are some further nuances when it comes to Chase’s 5/24 rule, so I think those are probably best addressed in the form of some frequently asked questions.

Are there exceptions to Chase’s 5/24 rule?

Nowadays there aren’t any major exceptions to Chase’s 5/24 rule. In the past being a Chase Private Client or getting a targeted offer was potentially a workaround, but that’s not the case anymore.

Do mortgages, loans, etc., count towards the 5/24 limit?

Chase’s 5/24 rule is based on having opened five or more new card accounts in the past 24 months. Other credit inquiries, including car loans, mortgages, etc., don’t count towards the 5/24 limit.

How long after falling under the 5/24 limit should you apply for a card?

I recommend waiting until the beginning of the following month after you fall under the 5/24 limit before applying for a card.

In other words, if your fifth most recent card application was on June 4, 2019 (as is the case for me), then 24 months from then would be June 4, 2021. However, I’d wait until July 1, 2021, to apply for a card, since often falling underneath the limit isn’t instant.

Does Amex have a 5/24 rule?

The 5/24 rule is specifically a Chase credit card approval guideline. Every card issuer has different restrictions on approving members for cards, though the 5/24 rule is only a factor when applying for Chase cards.

Does product changing a card affect the 5/24 limit?

There can be a lot of value to product changing or downgrading a credit card, since this allows you to preserve your credit history (which can be good for your credit score). If you do product change a credit card — whether a Chase card or not — does this count as a further card towards your 5/24 limit?

The answer is that it depends — if there’s a hard pull and/or your card number is changed, then it will typically appear on your credit report as a new account, and would count towards that limit. Meanwhile if there’s no hard pull and the card number stays the same, then generally it wouldn’t count as a card towards that limit.

Does being an authorized user on a card count towards the 5/24 limit?

If you’re the authorized user on someone else’s credit card, does that count towards the 5/24 limit? Unfortunately it usually does, at least in situations where you need to provide your social security number to be an authorized user. This can be a reason to minimize the number of cards on which you’re an authorized user.

Do charge cards count towards the 5/24 limit?

Yes, charge cards count towards the 5/24 limit, unless they’re business cards. For those of you not familiar with charge cards, some Amex cards are designated as such, and the distinction is that you have no set credit limit, and you have to pay your balance in full every month.

Since these cards still show on your personal credit report, they would count towards the Chase 5/24 limit.

Can you be added as a Chase authorized user if you’re over the 5/24 limit?

If you’re over the 5/24 limit you can still be added as an authorized user on someone else’s Chase cards. You just can’t outright be approved for your own Chase card.

What is the Chase 2/30 rule?

With Chase’s 2/30 rule, you will typically be approved for at most two personal Chase cards in a 30 day period (and you can typically be approved for at most one business card in that period). This is an additional restriction for Chase approvals, beyond the 5/24 rule.

Best Chase 5/24 credit card application strategy

With most questions about the Chase 5/24 rule (hopefully) answered, I wanted to provide some advice for the best approach to take towards credit card applications in light of this restriction.

Apply for Chase cards before other cards

While all major card issuers have application restrictions, Chase’s restrictions are the strictest when it comes to considering the cards you’ve applied for with other card issuers. As a result I’d recommend applying for Chase credit cards early on in your credit journey.

In other words, if you’re interested in cards from Amex, Chase, and Citi, pick up the Chase cards first.

Apply for Chase business cards before personal cards

If you’re interested in applying for both personal and business Chase cards, make sure you apply for business cards first. As explained above, while both personal and business Chase cards are subjected to the 5/24 rule, applying for a Chase business card doesn’t count as a further card towards that limit. That’s because a Chase business card won’t fully display on your personal credit report.

In other words, get the Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card before you get the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card.

Apply for “hub” Chase cards first

There are so many great Chase cards, so it can be tough to choose which card to apply for first. You’ll want to be sure you get the “key” cards first, which can help you maximize the value of other cards, especially within the Ultimate Rewards ecosystem.

If you’re looking for a personal credit card strategy:

If you’re looking for a business credit card strategy:

Chase 5/24 rule bottom line

Chase has a lot of great travel rewards credit cards that are worth acquiring for anyone looking to maximize their credit card strategy. When it comes to being approved, the 5/24 rule is the most important restriction to understand. With this, you typically won’t be approved for Chase cards if you’ve opened five or more new card accounts in the past 24 months.

Hopefully the above answers any of the questions you may have about this rule, so that you can get the best Chase cards possible.

What has your experience been with the Chase 5/24 rule? Do you have any questions about the rule that I haven’t answered?

US Google Monopoly Case Could Hit Supreme Court AmEx Hurdle

This month, the Federal Trade Commission lost a case against Qualcomm Inc. in a ruling that quoted extensively from the AmEx precedent. When the …

(Bloomberg) — As the Justice Department prepares to file a landmark antitrust lawsuit against Alphabet Inc.’s Google, a 2018 Supreme Court decision in favor of American Express Co. could complicate matters.

Attorney General William Barr is expected as soon as September to sue the search and online advertising giant, alleging it engages in anticompetitive conduct, according to people familiar with the matter. Numerous states, which are also investigating Google, could join the lawsuit or file their own later, two of the people said, asking not to be named discussing a confidential matter.

When the enforcers move, antitrust experts say they’ll likely have to contend with the American Express decision, in which the high court said that the credit-card giant, like many other companies, operates in a so-called two-sided market. Conduct that may harm one side could benefit the other, the justices said, and government lawyers must prove harm to both sides. The decision has already caused the U.S. to suffer at least two losses in major antitrust cases.

On the surface, the search giant and the credit-card issuer have little in common. But they both interact with customers in two distinct markets. American Express serves consumers who use the card to pay for purchases and retailers who accept the card in lieu of cash. Likewise, Google’s display advertising business engages with advertisers on one side and publishers on the other, while its search unit serves advertisers and web users.

Federal and state enforcers need to be prepared for Google to invoke the AmEx ruling in its defense, antitrust experts say. The company has argued that competition has helped lower the cost of online ads in recent years, and highlighted the money it makes for publishers. Successfully raising that legal precedent would put a higher burden on government lawyers to prove that Google’s behavior is anticompetitive.

“People are going to have to try to guess when a court is going to say, ‘Oh no, your market is actually two-sided,’ and they will have to have the backup market definition ready to go,” said Chris Sagers, a professor at the Cleveland State University law school. “If they don’t, case dismissed.”

State and federal enforcers in recent weeks have demanded additional information on Google’s ad business and accelerated a dive into the company’s flagship search business, Bloomberg has reported.

Google’s lucrative search ad business sells advertising space to brands around the results it provides to consumers. It also plays a key intermediary role connecting buyers and sellers of digital display ads across the web, and as a seller of display ad space for its YouTube video unit. Investigators have looked into all three, Bloomberg has reported.

Antitrust experts said that one reason for the delay in the Google lawsuit, which was expected in July, could be that government lawyers needed more time to construct the case to meet the standards in the AmEx ruling.

“That’s a complex, lengthy complaint to draft, and that takes time,” said Spencer Weber Waller, director of the Institute for Consumer Antitrust Studies at Loyola University Chicago. The government would probably have to create a “a belt-and-suspenders approach” that says why it would win under two kinds of market definitions, he said.

The Justice Department declined to comment. A Google representative didn’t respond to a request for comment.

The Supreme Court in 2018 held that there are two sides in each credit-card transaction — the merchant and the cardholder. AmEx charged merchants higher fees to process the transactions, while barring them from steering retail customers to cards with lower fees. The justices ruled that the ban may have harmed merchants but that enforcers needed to establish whether consumers also were harmed, and referred to the robust rewards programs funded by the fees as an offsetting benefit.

Some antitrust scholars are optimistic that the Justice Department can produce the evidence it needs for its case because of Google’s dominant position in online advertising.

“It doesn’t matter if the digital advertising market is two-sided within the Supreme Court’s definition, or three or four or five,” said an antitrust roadmap funded by the Omidyar Network as part of a larger effort to boost enforcement in the technology sector. The company “has harmed competition among publishers, publisher ad servers, exchanges, demand side servers, and advertisers, all to the ultimate detriment of consumers.” One of the authors is Yale University’s Fiona Scott Morton, a former Justice Department official who has urged a case against Google, while advising Amazon.com Inc. and Apple Inc., which are also under antitrust scrutiny.

Other antitrust experts have said that Google might struggle to persuade a court that its search-advertising business should be seen as the kind of two-sided market the justices described in AmEx.

The reason is that the Supreme Court’s majority opinion said that enforcers need not look on both sides of some two-sided markets, including newspapers. Unlike AmEx, where the value of the cards increases the more that both merchants and customers use them, the justices reasoned that the two sides of a newspaper market are more independent, with readers caring little about how many advertisers take out space.

Many experts said they saw a likely hurdle for Google, where users also seek information without much regard for the variety of advertisers competing for their attention. If a court viewed the company’s search operation like a newspaper, that would make the Justice Department’s case simpler.

“What’s Google but a newspaper in some deep sense?” said Harry First, co-director of the Competition, Innovation, and Information Law Program at New York University. “It’s the same thing dressed up in digits.”

Even the Justice Department’s antitrust chief, who is now recused from the case, said last April he didn’t see the ruling touching on Google’s search business.

Yet the AmEx case has already handed federal enforcers some defeats. This month, the Federal Trade Commission lost a case against Qualcomm Inc. in a ruling that quoted extensively from the AmEx precedent. When the Justice Department challenged the merger of travel technology companies Sabre Corp. and Farelogix Inc., a court approved the combination, finding that the companies don’t compete because one was a two-sided market while the other is single-sided. The deal was abandoned soon after, however, because of U.K. government concerns.

After those losses, government lawyers “might be a little more cautious and thinking more about how the AmEx decision may affect a case against Google,” said Bloomberg Intelligence antitrust analyst Jennifer Rie.

“It’s definitely a speed bump,” she said. “It may be more.”

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

For 22nd Century Group Inc. [XXII], Chardan Capital Markets sees a rise to $11.50. What next?

VANGUARD GROUP INC, holding 5,660,667 shares of the stock with an approximate value of $3.59 million in XXII stocks shares; and BLACKROCK …

22nd Century Group Inc. [AMEX: XXII] plunged by -$0.03 during the normal trading session on Monday and reaching a high of $0.65 during the day while it closed the day at $0.63.

22nd Century Group Inc. stock has also gained 2.87% of its value over the past 7 days. However, XXII stock has declined by -25.48% in the 3 months of the year. Over the past six months meanwhile, it has lost -31.65% and lost -42.35% year-on date.

The market cap for XXII stock reached $87.80 million, with 138.85 million shares outstanding and 136.40 million shares in the current float. Compared to the average trading volume of 1.34M shares, XXII reached a trading volume of 1103591 in the most recent trading day, which is why market watchdogs consider the stock to be active.

Here’s what leading stock market gurus have to say about 22nd Century Group Inc. [XXII]:

Chardan Capital Markets have made an estimate for 22nd Century Group Inc. shares, keeping their opinion on the stock as Buy, with their previous recommendation back on October 16, 2017. While these analysts kept the previous recommendation, Chardan Capital Markets dropped their target price from $4.50 to $3.50. The new note on the price target was released on August 11, 2016, representing the official price target for 22nd Century Group Inc. stock.

The Average True Range (ATR) for 22nd Century Group Inc. is set at 0.04, with the Price to Sales ratio for XXII stock in the period of the last 12 months amounting to 3.23. The Price to Book ratio for the last quarter was 1.63, with the Price to Cash per share for the same quarter was set at 0.21.

XXII stock trade performance evaluation

22nd Century Group Inc. [XXII] gain into the green zone at the end of the last week, gaining into a positive trend and gaining by 2.87. With this latest performance, XXII shares dropped by -22.76% in over the last four-week period, additionally sinking by -31.65% over the last 6 months – not to mention a drop of -68.13% in the past year of trading.

Overbought and oversold stocks can be easily traced with the Relative Strength Index (RSI), where an RSI result of over 70 would be overbought, and any rate below 30 would indicate oversold conditions. An RSI rate of 50 would represent a neutral market momentum. The current RSI for XXII stock in for the last two-week period is set at 32.62, with the RSI for the last a single of trading hit 30.39, and the three-weeks RSI is set at 35.61 for 22nd Century Group Inc. [XXII]. The present Moving Average for the last 50 days of trading for this stock 0.7584, while it was recorded at 0.6505 for the last single week of trading, and 0.8879 for the last 200 days.

22nd Century Group Inc. [XXII]: An insightful look at the core fundamentals

Operating Margin for any stock indicates how profitable investing would be, and 22nd Century Group Inc. [XXII] shares currently have an operating margin of -86.81 and a Gross Margin at -5.46. 22nd Century Group Inc.’s Net Margin is presently recorded at -102.81.

Return on Total Capital for XXII is now -32.89, given the latest momentum, and Return on Invested Capital for the company is -39.39. Return on Equity for this stock declined to -39.84, with Return on Assets sitting at -36.32. When it comes to the capital structure of this company, 22nd Century Group Inc. [XXII] has a Total Debt to Total Equity ratio set at 2.38. Additionally, XXII Total Debt to Total Capital is recorded at 2.32, with Total Debt to Total Assets ending up at 2.14. Long-Term Debt to Equity for the company is recorded at 1.09, with the Long-Term Debt to Total Capital now at 1.06.

Reflecting on the efficiency of the workforce at the company, 22nd Century Group Inc. [XXII] managed to generate an average of -$396,396 per employee. Receivables Turnover for the company is 29.72 with a Total Asset Turnover recorded at a value of 0.35.22nd Century Group Inc.’s liquidity data is similarly interesting compelling, with a Quick Ratio of 5.30 and a Current Ratio set at 5.70.

22nd Century Group Inc. [XXII]: Insider Ownership positions

There are presently around $20 million, or 28.30% of XXII stock, in the hands of institutional investors. The top three institutional holders of XXII stocks are: ETF MANAGERS GROUP, LLC with ownership of 13,878,011, which is approximately 3.677% of the company’s market cap and around 1.50% of the total institutional ownership; VANGUARD GROUP INC, holding 5,660,667 shares of the stock with an approximate value of $3.59 million in XXII stocks shares; and BLACKROCK INC., currently with $1.43 million in XXII stock with ownership of nearly -72.642% of the company’s market capitalization.

Positions in 22nd Century Group Inc. stocks held by institutional investors increased at the end of August and at the time of the August reporting period, where 35 institutional holders increased their position in 22nd Century Group Inc. [AMEX:XXII] by around 4,782,835 shares. Additionally, 51 investors decreased positions by around 13,598,273 shares, while 28 investors held positions by with 13,412,533 shares. The mentioned changes placed institutional holdings at 31,793,641 shares, according to the latest SEC report filing. XXII stock had 19 new institutional investments in for a total of 3,079,803 shares, while 21 institutional investors sold positions of 1,592,082 shares during the same period.