SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft successfully docks with ISS

Over the weekend, SpaceX launched its Dragon cargo spacecraft packed with supplies for the International Space Station. Now, two days later, NASA …

Over the weekend, SpaceX launched its Dragon cargo spacecraft packed with supplies for the International Space Station. Now, two days later, NASA has confirmed that the spacecraft successfully docked with the ISS, bringing with it more than 5,500lbs of cargo that includes hardware, research materials, and supplies for crew members. This marks SpaceX’s 17th contracted commercial resupply mission.

According to NASA, the Dragon cargo capsule docked with the Harmony module on the ISS just after 9:30AM EDT on May 6, 2019. SpaceX’s spacecraft is one of six spaceships currently docked with the ISS, joining Russia’s Progress 71 and 72 resupply ships, the Soyuz MS-11 and MS-12 crew ships, and the Northrop Grumman Cygnus space freighter.

NASA has provided some information on the cargo that SpaceX delivered in its most recent resupply run, including a new tech called “tissue chips.” This technology may help predict how effective different medications will be in human patients; it works via fluids infused with toxins or drugs that are passed through the chip to simulate blood flow. More on that here.

As well, the cargo spaceship delivered the Hermes Facility to the ISS. This experiment station, NASA previously explained, enables researchers on the ground to control studies on the ISS “as if they were in space themselves,” opening the doors to a new type of communication between the two destinations.

The space agency says the SpaceX Dragon cargo capsule will spend around one month docked with the ISS, during which time the cargo will be unloaded and reloaded with other items that need returned to Earth. The spacecraft will then return those items to the surface, completing the most recent cargo mission.

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SpaceX makes a 5500-pound delivery to ISS

SpaceX launched its Falcon 9 rocket Saturday after a destroyed capsule in April and an electrical issue on Friday. On Monday morning, it completed …
spacex

The Dragon capsule.

NASA/SpaceX

SpaceX launched its Falcon 9 rocket Saturday on the heels of a destroyed capsule in April and an electrical issue on Friday. On Monday morning, it completed a delivery to the International Space Station.

The uncrewed Dragon cargo spacecraft containing 5,500 pounds of supplies, hardware and materials, including more than 250 science and research investigations to take place on the ISS, was captured by the station’s robotic arm at 4:01 a.m. PT Monday morning. It was then installed onto the station’s Harmony module at 6:32 a.m. PT.

NASA on Monday tweeted out a time-lapse video of cargo craft being captured.

Checkout this incredible time lapse video of this morning’s capture of the @SpaceX Dragon cargo craft by astronaut @Astro_DavidS of @CSA_ASC, backed up by @AstroHague of @NASA. #AskNASA | https://t.co/cBNqC5JGazpic.twitter.com/IUp0FnpoW2

— Intl. Space Station (@Space_Station) May 6, 2019

After four weeks at the ISS, the Dragon, with a cargo of 4,400 pounds, will leave the space station and begin its return to Earth, splashing down in the Pacific Ocean near Baja California.

SpaceX had its first successful Dragon mission back in March when it delivered 400 pounds of supplies and equipment. That mission also had its own setbacks.

SpaceX didn’t immediately to a request for comment.

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SpaceX cargo ship reaches space station

A SpaceX Dragon cargo ship caught up with the International Space Station early Monday and then stood by while Canadian astronaut David …
Credit: NASA TV

A SpaceX Dragon cargo ship caught up with the International Space Station early Monday and then stood by while Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques, operating the lab’s robot arm, locked onto the spacecraft to wrap up a two-day rendezvous.

“Well done, well captured,” a flight controller radioed from the Johnson Space Center in Houston. “Way to make it look easy.”

“To all the teams around the world, we welcome to the ISS the Dragon spacecraft,” Saint-Jacques replied. “Dragon left Cape Canaveral two days ago and brings to ISS more than 2,500 kilos (5,500 pounds) of supplies and scientific equipment for institutions and companies around the world.”

With the Dragon safely in hand, flight controllers at the Johnson Space Center in Houston planned to take over, operating the Canadian-built space crane by remote control to pull the Dragon in for berthing at the Earth-facing port of the station’s forward Harmony module.

“As a Canadian, I’m proud every time we use the Canadarm2 for capture. There’s not always a Canadian crew member on board ISS, but in a way, the Canadian engineers and technicians who built and support Canadarm2 are always on board, if not in body at least in spirit. Their ingenuity … is an inspiration to us all.”

Making its second visit to the space station, the reusable Dragon capsule’s pressurized cabin was packed with food, clothing and personal items for the crew, spare parts, computer gear and 1,600 pounds of science equipment and research material.

Another 2,128 pounds of hardware was mounted in the ship’s unpressurized trunk section, including a sophisticated instrument that will be mounted on a deck outside the Japanese Kibo lab module to monitor carbon dioxide levels in Earth’s atmosphere.

The Dragon is the third cargo ship launched to the space station so far this year following a Russian Progress that reached the lab April 4 and a Northrop Grumman Cygnus that was attached to the central Unity module on April 19. The next cargo run, by another SpaceX Dragon, is planned for July.

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VIDEO: SpaceX Dragon CRS-17 Cargo Spacecraft Attaches To International Space Station

(NASA) – Two days after its launch from Florida, the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft was installed on the Earth-facing side of the International Space …

By Space Coast Daily // May 6, 2019

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spacecraft attached at 9:32 a.m. EDT

ABOVE VIDEO:The SpaceX Dragon CRS-17 cargo spacecraft was captured by the International Space Station.

(NASA) – Two days after its launch from Florida, the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft was installed on the Earth-facing side of the International Space Station’s Harmony module at 9:32 a.m. EDT.

The 17th contracted commercial resupply mission from SpaceX (CRS-17) delivers more than 5,500 pounds of research, crew supplies and hardware to the orbiting laboratory.

Here’s some of the science arriving at station:

– Scientists are using a new technology called tissue chips, which could help predict the effectiveness of potential medicines in humans.

– Fluid that mimics blood can be passed through the chip to simulate blood flow, and can include drugs or toxins. In microgravity, changes occur in human health and human cells that resemble accelerated aging and disease processes. This investigation allows scientists to make observations over the course of a few weeks in microgravity rather than the months it would take in a laboratory on Earth.

Two days after its launch from Florida, the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft was installed on the Earth-facing side of the International Space Station’s Harmony module at 9:32 a.m. EDT. (SpaceX/NASA Image)

The Hermes facility allows scientists to study the dusty, fragmented debris covering asteroids and moons, called regolith.

Once installed by astronauts on the space station, scientists will be able to take over the experiment from Earth to study how regolith particles behave in response to long-duration exposure to microgravity, including changes to pressure, temperate and shocks from impacts and other forces.

The investigations will provide insight into the formation and behavior of asteroids, comets, impact dynamics and planetary evolution.

These are just a few of the hundreds of investigations that will help us learn how to keep astronauts healthy during long-duration space travel and demonstrate technologies for future human and robotic exploration beyond low-Earth orbit to the Moon and Mars.

Space station research also provides opportunities for other U.S. government agencies, private industry, and academic and research institutions to conduct microgravity research that leads to new technologies, medical treatments, and products that improve life on Earth.

After Dragon spends approximately one month attached to the space station, the spacecraft will return to Earth with about XX pounds of cargo and research.

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SpaceX’s Dragon capsule docks with International Space Station

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla., May 6 (UPI) — SpaceX‘s Dragon spacecraft docked and bolted to the International Space Station on schedule Monday …

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla., May 6 (UPI) —SpaceX‘s Dragon spacecraft docked and bolted to the International Space Station on schedule Monday morning.

It was the 17th such mission for the space company’s Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA.

Video of the docking sequence on NASA Live showed the station as it traveled at more than 7,000 mph into nighttime darkness over the Indian Ocean. The craft launched on top of a Falcon 9 rocket early Saturday from Florida.

Earlier on Monday, Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques used the station’s robotic arm, or Canadarm2, to capture the craft and line it up with the docking hatch.

NASA also showed in the video that Dragon was one of six craft parked at the station now. The others include Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus cargo craft that launched in April from Virginia, two Russian Soyuz capsules and two Russian Progress cargo capsules.

The crew aboard the station was to open the hatch Monday afternoon to begin unpacking the Dragon’s 5,500 pounds of cargo. Most of that, about 3,400 pounds, is pressurized and includes sensitive scientific equipment.

Dragon will be bolted to the spacecraft for about a month for unloading and repacking with around 2,000 pounds for the return trip, said Leah Cheshier, a NASA Mission Control communications specialist.

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