NASA Nabs Emmy Nominations for SpaceX Launch, Mars Landing

The second Emmy nomination is for NASA’s coverage of the March 2019 flight of SpaceX’s first Crew Dragon spacecraft on an uncrewed test flight.

Two NASA broadcasts for historic milestones in space exploration have nabbed Emmy nominations for interactive programming, but will the space agency take home a statue?

NASA’s coverage of its InSight landing on Mars in November 2018 earned its first 2019 Emmy nomination for Outstanding Original Interactive Program to recognize the agency’s news, webb education, TV and social media efforts.

InSight is the first mission to study the deep interior of Mars, using an ultra-sensitive seismometer, a heat-flow probe and other instruments. InSight is managed for NASA by JPL, a division of Caltech in Pasadena,” NASA officials said in a statement Friday (Sept. 13). “JPL won the 2018 Emmy Award for Outstanding Original Interactive Program for its coverage of the Cassini mission’s Grand Finale at Saturn.”

Watch: NASA’s Emmy Video for InSight Mars Landing

Watch:
NASA’s SpaceX Crew Dragon Emmy Video

The second Emmy nomination is for NASA’s coverage of the March 2019 flight of SpaceX’s first Crew Dragon spacecraft on an uncrewed test flight. During that test flight, called Demonstration Mission 1, SpaceX launched human-rated Crew Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station and back as a shakedown cruise for eventual crewed missions. It was the first privately-developed crew-capable spacecraft to visit the space station.

Related: SpaceX’s Crew Dragon Demo-1 Test Flight in Pictures

“The nomination is a result of years of preparation for the historic launch and multiple live broadcasts from NASA and SpaceX facilities across the country during each phase of the Crew Dragon’s mission to the International Space Station and its stunning return to Earth,” NASA officials said in the statement. “Throughout NASA’s coverage, the agency and SpaceX engaged social media users around the world and at local social media influencer gatherings at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.”

NASA’s Emmy nominations are part of the Creative Arts Emmys, which are being awarded this weekend (Sept. 14 and Sept. 15) at the Microsoft Theatre in Los Angeles. According to NASA, an edited version of the ceremonies will air Sept. 21 on the cable channel FXX, and will appear in the full 71st Primetime Emmys broadcast on Sept. 22.

Email Tariq Malik at tmalik@space.com or follow him @tariqjmalik. Follow us @Spacedotcom and Facebook

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Watch: SpaceX’s Crew Dragon Takes A Rough Emergency System Test

SpaceX is banking on its commercial space taxi, Crew Dragon to fly seven astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) in an orbital mission to …

SpaceX is banking on its commercial space taxi, Crew Dragon to fly seven astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) in an orbital mission to and from Earth. So far, the American aerospace company has completed over 700 tests of the space cab’s SuperDraco engines, that allow for orbital maneuvering.

SEE ALSO: NASA Astronauts Try On Next-Gen SpaceX Spacesuits For The 2020 Mars Mission

Now, the Crew Dragon is being tested rigorously for its emergency abort system, as per a video that was posted by SpaceX on Twitter. The dramatic video shows the space cab outfitted with eight SuperDraco engines, allowing it to cover half a mile in just 7.5 seconds at the time of an emergency, as tweeted by SpaceX. The maximum speed that the Crew Dragon can reach at this point is 436 metres per hour.

Ahead of our in-flight abort test for @Commercial_Crew—which will demonstrate Crew Dragon’s ability to safely carry astronauts away from the rocket in the unlikely event of an emergency—our team has completed over 700 tests of the spacecraft’s SuperDraco engines pic.twitter.com/nswMPCK3F9

— SpaceX (@SpaceX) September 12, 2019

Fired together at full throttle, Crew Dragon’s eight SuperDracos can move the spacecraft 0.5 miles—the length of over 7 American football fields lined up end to end—in 7.5 seconds, reaching a peak velocity of 436 mph

— SpaceX (@SpaceX) September 12, 2019

As the system deploys mid-air, parachutes ensure that the craft safely lands back on Earth. This mechanism is carefully designed for when something goes wrong with the rocket carrying the Crew Dragon to orbit. The module, thus, can fire up its thrusters to quickly evade the danger and then, balloon down sustaining minimal damage to the craft.

SEE ALSO: SpaceX Dragon Returns To Earth From The International Space Station With Science Hauls for NASA

But it hasn’t always been a smooth ride testing out the Crew Dragon. The same engines that make up the integrated launch system, caused the first Crew Dragon capsule to blow up during a system check in April. The explosion happened due to a leaking valve. As per Digital Trends, the aerospace company’s Falcon 9 booster launched the Crew Dragon capsule into orbit on July 25. The Dragon capsule contains 5,500 pounds worth of equipment for experiments and ongoing scientific research to supply the ISS.

As SpaceX is perfecting its soon-to-be-manned capsule, it tested out the first stage of its Falcon 9 boosters that will be responsible for launching two NASA astronauts into orbit as a part of Crew Dragon’s first-ever chartered test flight. The exact date of that test flight is still uncertain.

SEE ALSO: SpaceX To Launch Its First Commercial Starship Mission In 2021

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