Phishing scams targeting Mac users on the rise with 1.6 million attacks in 2019

Kaspersky caught 1.6 million phishing attacks disguised as the Apple brand in the … Kaspersky said the total number of phishing attacks have grown … the amount of malicious and unwanted software is growing,” stated the release.

How sophisticated phishing grants attackers total control of your computerPhishing is all about the bad guy and fooling the victim, says Kevin Mitnick, founder, Mitnick Security Consulting. Mitnick knows about bad guys-he used to be one.

Apple users like to think their devices are a bit safer than other brands, but a new report from Kaspersky shows that cybercriminals are increasingly trying to attack Mac customers.

Kaspersky’s mid-year “Threats to MacOS Users” report highlights just how many attacks the company stops for its customers.

COVER STORY

Cyberweapons are now in play: From US sabotage of a North Korean missile test to hacked emergency sirens in Dallas

Cyberwarfare has already begun. Unlike nuclear weapons, cyberweapons can be proliferated more quickly and the threat from accidentally setting them off is even greater.

In only the first six months of 2019, the number of phishing attacks disguised using the Apple brand grew to 1.6 million. Kaspersky said the total number of phishing attacks have grown exponentially since 2015, when there were only 852,293 attacks. Just in the first half of this year, 5,932,195 attacks were committed, the report stated.

SEE: Windows 10 security: A guide for business leaders (TechRepublic Premium)

“The owners of MacBooks and iMacs are only rivaled by Linux users in terms of the level of confidence in their own security, and we must admit that they are right to a certain degree: Compared to Windows-based systems, there are far fewer threats that target macOS,” said Kaspersky researchers Mikhail Kuzin, Tatyana Shcherbakova, Tatyana Sidorina and Vitaly Kamluk, in a press release.

However, the press release continued, that situation is changing, since the popularity of the latter platform is growing. “Due to this and despite all the efforts that have been taken by the company, the threat landscape for Apple devices is changing, and the amount of malicious and unwanted software is growing,” stated the release.

Of the 6 million phishing attacks Kaspersky dealt with, nearly 12% targeted corporate users. Hackers also concentrated on Mac users outside of the United States, according to Kaspersky’s survey.

“While technically these fraud schemes are nothing new, we believe they pose an even greater danger to Apple users than similar schemes against users of other platforms – such as Windows or Android,” said Tatyana Sidorina, security researcher at Kaspersky. “That is because the ecosystem around Macs and other Apple devices is generally considered a far safer environment. Therefore users might be less cautious when they encounter fake websites. Meanwhile the successful theft of iCloud account credentials could lead to serious consequences. We urge users of Apple devices to pay more attention to any emails they receive claiming to be from technical support, which request your details or ask you to visit a link.”

To compile the report, Kaspersky used statistics from their Kaspersky Security Network cloud infrastructure, which stores information about all of the malicious programs or threats that affect Mac users.

Brazil had the largest share of unique macOS users who experienced phishing attacks at 30%, while both France and India had about 22%. Kaspersky highlighted that hackers were increasingly using Apple iconography to trick people into handing over Apple IDs and credentials.

“These phishing attacks aim to steal users’ Apple IDs. Links to these sites are usually sent in emails that allegedly come from Apple Support. The recipient is threatened that their account will be locked unless they click the link and log in to confirm the information that has been specified in their profile,” the Kaspersky report stated.

The report continued, “Another phishing trick is to send thank you messages for purchasing an Apple device or app on the App Store. The ‘client’ is invited to learn more about the product (or cancel the purchase) by clicking a link that leads to a phishing page. Here, the victim is required to enter their Apple ID login and password, which, of course, will be sent to the attackers.”

Last year there were 1.5 million attacks using Apple’s branding, which pales in comparison to this year. By June 2019, Kaspersky stopped 1.6 million similar attacks, and the security company said these kinds of attacks grows by 30–40% every year.

“The vast majority of threats for macOS in 2019 were in the AdWare category. As for the malware threats, the Shlayer family, which masquerades as Adobe Flash Player or an update for it has been the most prevalent,” the Kaspersky study stated.

SEE: Special report: Cybersecurity in an IoT and mobile world (free PDF) (TechRepublic Premium)

Kaspersky stressed that Apple users needed to shed the idea that the company’s devices were infallible because multiple hacking groups were hard at work on a variety of methods to steal information.

According to Kaspersky, there were at least eight full-fledged campaigns aimed squarely at attacking the users of MacBook, iPhone, and other devices over the past few years.

Mac users have traditionally seen themselves as safe because for many years, they truly were. There are more Windows and Android devices worldwide, making it more cost effective for hackers to focus on those operating systems over Apple, which still largely has a niche, US-centered audience.

Business users should be particularly wary considering the steep rise in attacks centered around Apple products used by financial institutions and other companies.

“Several well-known cybercriminal groups are currently working to develop malware for these operating systems, but the likelihood that a random user will be the target of such programs is extremely small,” Kaspersky said in the report. “However, if you work in a financial institution, such as, for example, a bank, and your MacBook or iPhone is a corporate device, then the chances that you will be targeted increase considerably. In this case the threat is significant enough, so we do not recommend relying on the fact that Apple devices are in general less popular targets, and we recommend seeking out a reliable security solution. More so as we expect the number of targeted attacks on macOS and iOS devices to increase between 2019 and 2020.”

Cybersecurity Insider Newsletter

Strengthen your organization’s IT security defenses by keeping abreast of the latest cybersecurity news, solutions, and best practices. Delivered Tuesdays and Thursdays

Sign up today Sign up today

Also see

phishing

Image: iStockphoto/weerapatkiatdumrong

istock-488437074.jpg

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts

The photo Trump tweeted out from a classified briefing likely came from one of the US’s most …

“I’ve never seen anything like this before,” Dave Schmerler, the leading expert on open source imagery analysis who analyzed the Planet Labs photos …

  • President Donald Trump released a photo Friday from a classified intelligence briefing in a tweet taunting Iran after another failed Iranian rocket launch.
  • The photo appears to have come from a classified US surveillance asset, a KH-11 satellite known as USA-224. The satellite is one of the US’s most secretive assets, and experts say the photo Trump tweeted could be a windfall for hostile adversaries like Russia and China.
  • The capabilities of these satellites are closely guarded secrets, and people have been sent to prison for leaking photos from them.
  • “We had a photo and I released it, which I have the absolute right to do,” Trump, who has ultimate declassification authority as president, said after releasing the photo.

Analysts think the image President Donald Trump tweeted out Friday from a classified briefing to taunt Iran came from one of the US’s most advanced satellites.

Specifically, the photo is believed to have come from a US KH-11 spy satellite called USA-224.

“These are high resolution optical satellites that resemble the Hubble Space Telescope but look down to Earth instead of to the heavens,” Marco Langbroek, a Dutch expert who tracks satellites, wrote recently.

Trump’s tweet came a day after an Iranian rocket designed to carry satellites into space exploded on the launchpad, NPR reported.

Commercial satellite imagery of the blast was made publicly available after the incident, but the photo in Trump’s tweet was of a much higher resolution and better quality, leaving experts flabbergasted.

“I’ve never seen anything like this before,” Dave Schmerler, the leading expert on open-source imagery analysis who analyzed photos provided to NPR by Planet Labs, told Insider’s Alex Lockie. “I know that [the US military has] amazing capabilities, but I don’t know what this is.”

Read more: Trump may have revealed US military secrets by tweeting a photo to taunt Iran

The United States of America was not involved in the catastrophic accident during final launch preparations for the Safir SLV Launch at Semnan Launch Site One in Iran. I wish Iran best wishes and good luck in determining what happened at Site One. pic.twitter.com/z0iDj2L0Y3

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 30, 2019

Cees Bassa, a professional astronomer who works for Astron, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, was among the first to suggest that based on the features of the launchpad in the photo and the positioning of the camera, the image most likely came from the USA-224.

Michael Thompson, a Purdue University graduate student studying astrodynamics and spacecraft navigation, also used publicly available data to determine that the USA-224 passed over the Iranian space center on Thursday, Spaceflight Now reported.

Bassa explained that these satellites, known as Keyhole satellites, “are believed to produce the sharpest images of the Earth’s surface.”

Langbroek was also able to simulate the view from the USA-224, and it was a match to the photo Trump tweeted out. “It is a very good match so there is no doubt in my mind that it is an image taken by USA-224,” Langbroek wrote on Twitter.

I simulated the view from USA 224 (ADVANCED CRYSTAL optical reconnaissance satellite) towards the #Iranian launch platform. Simulation is for 09:44:23 UT when sat was at 43.97 deg elevation, azimuth 194.7 deg.

Simulation & real image compared:@mhanham@trbrtc@nktpnd@cgbassapic.twitter.com/qURATXpfuU

— Dr Marco Langbroek (@Marco_Langbroek) August 31, 2019

Read more: Intelligence veterans are pulling their hair out over Trump’s ‘outrageous’ and ‘moronic’ decision to tweet out a photo from a classified briefing

Melissa Hanham, an expert in satellite imagery, told NPR she was initially skeptical that a photo of that quality could have come from a satellite.

“When I saw the image, it was so crystal clear and high-resolution that I did not believe it could come from a satellite,” she said, acknowledging that the latest analysis was convincing and suggested that the USA-224 was “very likely” the source of the photo.

Intelligence veterans have suggested that the president’s tweet may be a windfall for adversaries, even if the photo in the tweet appeared to be a photo of a photo.

“One doesn’t use intel for the purposes of taunting. The Russians and the Chinese will be very happy to study this,” Robert Deitz, a former top lawyer at the CIA and the National Security Agency, told Insider.

“I imagine adversaries are going to take a look at this image and reverse-engineer it,” Hanham told NPR.

Defending his decision last week, Trump told reporters, “We had a photo and I released it, which I have the absolute right to do.”

But former officials stressed that even though, as president, Trump has the authority to declassify anything he wants, he was still expected to act with discretion.

John Sipher, a former CIA clandestine-services officer who spent 28 years at the agency, told Insider that Trump’s release of the image was “consistent with his disdain for foreign policy and intelligence expertise.” He added: “If he sees an immediate personal or political benefit, he does not feel any need to follow rules, regulations, protocol, or even laws.”

Bruce Klinger, a former CIA and DIA imagery analyst, posted on Twitter: “I still remember being warned about carefully controlling top secret information ‘whose unauthorized disclosure could result in exceptionally grave danger to the nation’ and the penalties associated with violating our responsibilities.”

The true capabilities of the $2 billion KH-11 spy satellites are closely guarded secrets, and people who have leaked those secrets have paid a price for it.

In the late 1970s, the former CIA employee William Kampiles was sentenced to 40 years in prison for espionage after he stole an instruction manual for the KH-11 satellites and sold it to the Soviets. In the 1980s, Samuel L. Morison, a Navy intelligence analyst, was sentenced to prison time for leaking three classified KH-11 photos to the press.

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts

Telecom networks: The changing face of conflict

Paired with hypersonic weapons and quantum encryption technologies, electronic warfare suites and space-based capabilities, China is fast gaining …
Telecom networks, 5G, 5G roll-out, India, Chinese equipment, telecom manufacturers, People’s Liberation ArmyTelecom networks, 5G, 5G roll-out, India, Chinese equipment, telecom manufacturers, People’s Liberation ArmyRegrettably, only telcos’ views have been solicited, even as foreign telecom OEMs mount a high-pitched campaign to push 5G.

By Smita Purushottam

A decision is reportedly soon going to be taken on the inclusion of Chinese equipment in 5G roll-out in India, based on the Principal Scientific Advisor’s inputs. Regrettably, only telcos’ views have been solicited, even as foreign telecom OEMs mount a high-pitched campaign to push 5G. A crucial decision is sought to be rushed through without taking the interests of indigenous world-class telecom manufacturers into account. The only charitable explanation for this omission is that our decision makers are not even aware of their existence. But before such a momentous decision affecting national and economic security is taken, it is essential to fully debate the implications of Chinese equipment inclusion in our networks. Given China’s record in acquiring technology through cyberespionage and other means, the enormous risks we are taking need to be highlighted.

First, one of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army’s core strengths is ‘information warfare’, which seamlessly interconnects battlefield operations in a 360-degree multi-domain environment, enabling lethal and targeted war-fighting responses in real time.

Information warfare is also at the heart of the PLA theory on ‘systems on systems’ confrontations, under which information dominance is the core precondition for achieving dominance in other domains (Rand report). China established the Strategic Support Force to operationalise this evolving doctrine and is thus honing a futuristic, deadly war machine with information warfare at its core, making even the mighty US defence establishment nervous.

By handing over control of our telecom networks, we are, in effect, handing over China’s weapon of choice to them! It would be good if our defence analysts studied the ‘connection’ between information warfare and control of telecom networks, pun unintended.

China is moving to ‘intelligentisation’, adding an extra layer of lethality to its high-tech arsenal, extensively discussed in ‘Battlefield Singularity’. In its most recent Defence White Paper, China has stated ‘intelligentisation’ is the next step in the evolution of warfare, beyond informatisation. Paired with hypersonic weapons and quantum encryption technologies, electronic warfare suites and space-based capabilities, China is fast gaining multiple battlefield advantages, and incidentally placing our vast weapons imports at risk of obsolescence. We would have been better off investing our funds in leapfrogging technologies.

Second, China has used every means to acquire the best and most advanced technologies from around the world, through mandatory technology transfers in exchange for market access (FDI), overseas high-tech acquisitions (ODI), tech diversion from the civil sector to the military (CMI), and outright cyberespionage (APE).

Third, more than 80% of India’s sensitive networks are reportedly already in Chinese hands, thanks to the Department of Telecommunications’s irresponsible handling of a strategic security asset—our telecom networks. The risks will be exponentially magnified once we let Chinese companies into 5G, as 5G immensely facilitates cognitive communications. China’s declared aim is to become the number one AI world power, and it is currently using AI to acquire total information control over its population. We do not yet know what AI is fully capable of, which means we are surrendering control over unknown realms to a country that has a history of belligerence towards India, demonstrated again by its reaction to the change in the status of Jammu and Kashmir.

Fourth, Chinese companies have ruthlessly underbid Indian companies in telecom tenders, no doubt massively subsidised by their country. After all, control of a country’s communications is worth the small change! Added to this is DoT’s refusal to release around Rs 1,000 crore owed to domestic companies, a partial list of which has been forwarded to our authorities, levying of one-sided discriminatory bank guarantees only on Indian companies, and forcing Indian companies to run around the world seeking expensive certifications. Domestic industries have thus effectively been ruled out of 4G networks. This especially is something for which “posterity will not forgive us,” as Nivedita Haran, a senior IAS officer who has dedicated herself to the service of the nation, stated. Parliament must conduct a full audit of the loss of a high-tech ecosystem and its enormous multipliers due to DoT’s actions.

The above, and recent discoveries of Chinese hardware Trojans in Supermicro motherboards, the exhaustive Mandiant report on the global cyberespionage of just one extraordinarily well-provisioned PLA unit, multiple US Congressional reports describing cybersecurity threat from China—all point to a massive, 24/7, multi-domain cyberespionage Chinese playbook, committing hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of cyberwarriors to this task.

It would, therefore, defy belief if Chinese companies, obligated by law to follow the Chinese Communist Party’s directions and share information with the State, would coyly refrain from exploiting their ownership of India’s ICT networks to our disadvantage.

There is a solution. Telecom should be declared a strategic national asset as a defence horizontal, and a telecom security Act should be adopted. We can simultaneously initiate action to leapfrog straight to 6G! Parag Naik, who is the head of one of the world’s top high-tech companies (Saankhya Labs), holds 6G patents. He painted an attractive picture of a high-tech India that supports its companies in launching an open, democratised, cognitive, indigenous 6G architecture. If the government supports the development of this technology, for which Indian companies already hold IPRs, India can leap straight to next-gen indigenous telecom networks. India could, in fact, become a high-tech 5G leader in manufacturing and worldwide exports, as a leading domestic telecom manufacturer confided. Many countries will trust Indian gear and rely on us as a safe alternative, particularly after the African Union headquarters hack by China, reported by Le Monde. This will also create thousands of high-tech jobs and massive multipliers, establish India at the forefront of technologically-advanced nations, and generate enormous national pride.

[The author is founder & chairperson, SITARA (Science, Indigenous Technology & Advanced Research Accelerator). Views are personal.]

Get live Stock Prices from BSE and NSE and latest NAV, portfolio of Mutual Funds, calculate your tax by Income Tax Calculator, know market’s Top Gainers, Top Losers & Best Equity Funds. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts

Private space company Planet Lab launches 300 satellites into orbit

Twenty-eight Planet Labs Dove satellites that are prepared for launch on the headquarters. Planet Lab additionally sells photos to over 200 clients, …

A non-public space company has launched the most important fleet of satellites into space in ‘human historical past’.

Planet Lab, based by ex-NASA scientists, declare they’ve launched 146 small satellites by rocket into space and have manufactured a complete of roughly 300 up to now.

The satellites mix to everything of Earth’s landmass to be used by intelligence businesses, agricultural firms and humanitarian functions.

Every satellite tv for pc is barely in regards to the measurement of a loaf of bread, weighs 12 kilos (5 kg) and makes use of the identical know-how utilized in smartphones to assemble knowledge.

The spy satellites take high-resolution images all around the world together with locations like Russia and North Korea.

Scroll down for video

A private space company has launched the largest fleet of satellites into space in 'human history'. Planet Lab, founded by ex-NASA scientists, claim they have launched 146 small satellites by rocket into space. Here, Dove satellites are deployed

A non-public space company has launched the most important fleet of satellites into space in ‘human historical past’. Planet Lab, based by ex-NASA scientists, declare they’ve launched 146 small satellites by rocket into space. Right here, Dove satellites are deployed

They orbit the globe each 90 minutes whereas the Earth rotates beneath them, documenting the planet because it adjustments.

Planet Lab additionally sells photos to over 200 clients, a lot of them agricultural firms monitoring the well being of crops.

Talking on CBS’s Sixty Minutes, Dr Will Marshall, co-founder of Planet, tells David Martin that he’s all the time astonished by the standard of the photographs.

Dr Marshall and his group evaluate the photographs to people who have been taken yesterday and see that ‘one thing has modified’.

‘We see rivers transfer, we see bushes go down, we see autos transfer, we see street surfaces change and it offers you a perspective of the planet as a dynamic and evolving factor that we have to deal with,’ he says.

Dr Marshall and his group began out with sending twenty-eight small satellites out into orbit from the Worldwide Space Station.

Dr Robbie Schingler, who started constructing satellites 20 years in the past, mentioned: ‘We took a satellite tv for pc that may be the scale of a pick-up truck and we shrunk it. We needed to make it in regards to the measurement of a loaf of bread.’

The satellites combine to photograph the entirety of Earth's landmass for use by intelligence agencies and humanitarian purposes. Each satellite is only about the size of a loaf of bread and weighs 12 pounds (5 kg) Here, David Martin with Robbie Schingle, left

The satellites combine to photograph the entirety of Earth's landmass for use by intelligence agencies and humanitarian purposes. Each satellite is only about the size of a loaf of bread and weighs 12 pounds (5 kg) Here, David Martin with Robbie Schingle, left

The satellites mix to everything of Earth’s landmass to be used by intelligence businesses and humanitarian functions. Every satellite tv for pc is barely in regards to the measurement of a loaf of bread and weighs 12 kilos (5 kg) Right here, David Martin with Robbie Schingle, left

 An image taken from Planet Lab satellites in 2014. The spy satellites take high-resolution photographs all over the world including places like Russia and North Korea. They orbit the globe every 90 minutes while the Earth rotates beneath them

 An image taken from Planet Lab satellites in 2014. The spy satellites take high-resolution photographs all over the world including places like Russia and North Korea. They orbit the globe every 90 minutes while the Earth rotates beneath them

A picture taken from Planet Lab satellites in 2014. The spy satellites take high-resolution images all around the world together with locations like Russia and North Korea. They orbit the globe each 90 minutes whereas the Earth rotates beneath them

 Twenty-eight Planet Labs Dove satellites which are ready for launch at the headquarters. Planet Lab also sells images to over 200 customers, many of them agricultural companies monitoring the health of crops

 Twenty-eight Planet Labs Dove satellites which are ready for launch at the headquarters. Planet Lab also sells images to over 200 customers, many of them agricultural companies monitoring the health of crops

Twenty-eight Planet Labs Dove satellites that are prepared for launch on the headquarters. Planet Lab additionally sells photos to over 200 clients, a lot of them agricultural firms monitoring the well being of crops

‘The way in which that I grew up– at NASA is we might spend about 5 to 10 years, even– to construct one satellite tv for pc,’ he mentioned.

The engineers at Planet construct by hand and function the ‘largest fleet of satellites in human historical past’ in a matter of months.

Dr Schingler, additionally a co-founder, mentioned: ‘Over time, we have constructed about 300 satellites. Over time. And final yr we launched about 146 satellites into space.

‘The satellites are referred to as doves. Right here on the manufacturing flooring they’re stored in “nests,” ready to be launched in “flocks.”

Speaking on CBS's Sixty Minutes , Dr Will Marshall, here on the programme, tells David Martin that he is always astonished by the quality of the images. Dr Marshall and his team compare the pictures to those that were taken yesterday and see that 'something has changed'

Speaking on CBS's Sixty Minutes , Dr Will Marshall, here on the programme, tells David Martin that he is always astonished by the quality of the images. Dr Marshall and his team compare the pictures to those that were taken yesterday and see that 'something has changed'

Talking on CBS’s Sixty Minutes , Dr Will Marshall, right here on the programme, tells David Martin that he’s all the time astonished by the standard of the photographs. Dr Marshall and his group evaluate the photographs to people who have been taken yesterday and see that ‘one thing has modified’

Robert Cardillo , director of the NGA, shows correspondent David Martin around the NGA operations center. says that the top-secret pictures 'ground zero for all the intelligence coming in from space'. Mr Cardillo would not comment on the number of spy satellites the NGA currently operates

Robert Cardillo , director of the NGA, shows correspondent David Martin around the NGA operations center. says that the top-secret pictures 'ground zero for all the intelligence coming in from space'. Mr Cardillo would not comment on the number of spy satellites the NGA currently operates

Robert Cardillo , director of the NGA, reveals correspondent David Martin across the NGA operations middle. says that the top-secret photos ‘floor zero for all of the intelligence coming in from space’. Mr Cardillo wouldn’t touch upon the variety of spy satellites the NGA at the moment operates

‘A traditional mission management you’ll have dozens and dozens of engineers for one satellite tv for pc. We flip that round, so we have now dozens of satellites for a single engineer.’

The information station visited the Planet Lab headquarters, which has about 400 staff, in a nondescript constructing in San Francisco.

‘On the day we visited Planet its satellites have been beaming down 1.2 million photos each 24 hours.’

Though the group didn’t see any of the highest secret photos that are analysed by the Nationwide Geospatial Intelligence Company as their phots ‘hardly ever see the sunshine of day’.

Robert Cardillo, director of the NGA, says that the top-secret photos ‘floor zero for all of the intelligence coming in from space’.

Mr Cardillo wouldn’t touch upon the variety of spy satellites the NGA at the moment operates.

WHAT IS THE NATIONAL GEOSPATIAL-INTELLIGENCE AGENCY

The Nationwide Geospatial-Intelligence Company (NGA) delivers world-class geospatial intelligence that gives a decisive benefit to policymakers, warfighters, intelligence professionals and first responders.

Anybody who sails a U.S. ship, flies a U.S. plane, makes nationwide coverage selections, fights wars, locates targets, responds to pure disasters, and even navigates with a cellphone depends on NGA.

NGA allows all of those vital actions and shapes selections that influence our world by the indispensable self-discipline of geospatial intelligence (GEOINT).

NGA is a novel mixture of intelligence company and fight assist company.

It’s the world chief in well timed, related, correct and actionable GEOINT.

NGA allows the U.S. intelligence neighborhood and the Division of Protection (DOD) to meet the president’s nationwide safety priorities to guard the nation.

Credit score: The NGA

The NGA is a authorities forms with a workforce of 14,500 and a 2.7 million square-foot headquarters south of Washington, D.C

These small satellites have created an enormous knowledge drawback for the federal government which might’t probably rent sufficient analysts to take a look at all these photos.

That is how the revolution started. Twenty-eight small satellites despatched out into orbit by astronauts from the most important of all satellites, the Worldwide Space Station.

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts

5 experimental cybersecurity trends your business needs to know about

A new report by CB Insights provides information on a number of emerging cybersecurity technologies that have the potential to help companies …

OODA Analyst

OODA is comprised of a unique team of international experts capable of providing advanced intelligence and analysis, strategy and planning support, risk and threat management, training, decision support, crisis response, and security services to global corporations and governments.

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts