Callisto Network Price Changed by 21.48 percent

Callisto Network CLO/BTC on Bitfinex exchange is 0.00. The trading volume on Bitfinex is 175.76. Callisto Network average change within 24 hour is …

As at 2019-09-14 average Callisto Network price is 0.00099254 USD, 0.00000010 BTC, 0.00000548 ETH.

Callisto Network CLO/LTC on STEX exchange is 0.00. The trading volume on STEX is 172.20.

At the same time Callisto Network CLO/CNYT on QBTC exchange is 0.00. The trading volume on QBTC is 196059.00.

Callisto Network CLO/BTC on Bitfinex exchange is 0.00. The trading volume on Bitfinex is 175.76.

Callisto Network average change within 24 hour is 21.48 against USD, 25 against BTC, 19.1 against ETH. Weekly report: -3.52 against USD, 0 against BTC, -8.13 against ETH. Monthly report: -46.7 against USD, -41.18 against BTC, -38.4 against ETH.

In this regard, 24 hour trading volume is 9282.29846935 USD or 0.93520649 BTC. At the same time Callisto Network market capitalization is 1965765 USD or $198 BTC.

It’s noteworthy that is issued into circulation Callisto Network.

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Callisto Network Price Changed by -9.81 percent

Callisto Network CLO/BTC on Bitfinex exchange is 0.00. The trading volume on Bitfinex is 333.24. In this regard, 24 hour trading volume is …

As at 2019-09-13 average Callisto Network price is 0.00081810 USD, 0.00000008 BTC, 0.00000460 ETH.

Callisto Network CLO/LTC on STEX exchange is 0.00. The trading volume on STEX is 37.82.

At the same time Callisto Network CLO/CNYT on QBTC exchange is 0.00. The trading volume on QBTC is 209115.00.

Callisto Network CLO/ETH on EtherFlyer exchange is 0.00. The trading volume on EtherFlyer is 0.41.

Callisto Network CLO/BTC on Bitfinex exchange is 0.00. The trading volume on Bitfinex is 333.24.

In this regard, 24 hour trading volume is 6532.77569409 USD or 0.63882417 BTC. At the same time Callisto Network market capitalization is 1618632 USD or $158 BTC.

Callisto Network average change within 24 hour is -9.81 against USD, -11.11 against BTC, -9.32 against ETH. Weekly report: -31.28 against USD, -27.27 against BTC, -31.61 against ETH. Monthly report: -52.75 against USD, -46.67 against BTC, -43.28 against ETH.

It’s noteworthy that is issued into circulation Callisto Network.

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What’s Behind Aurora Cannabis’ Q4 Miss — and Why It’s Throwing Shade on Canopy Growth

Aurora Cannabis (NYSE:ACB) didn’t have to provide revenue guidance in August for its fiscal 2019 fourth quarter. It didn’t have to project that revenue …

Aurora Cannabis(NYSE:ACB) didn’t have to provide revenue guidance in August for its fiscal 2019 fourth quarter. It didn’t have to project that revenue would come in between 100 million and 107 million in Canadian dollars. The company didn’t have to set expectations in its Q3 conference call that it would deliver positive adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) in the fourth quarter.

But Aurora indeed did make all of those predictions. And it failed to deliver on all counts.

The company’s executives discussed why it fell short of its guidance on its fourth-quarter conference call Thursday morning. They also took an opportunity to throw shade on rival Canopy Growth(NYSE:CGC).

An arrow on the outer edge of a target.

Image source: Getty Images.

Behind the miss

How did Aurora manage to miss on revenue guidance it provided little more than a month ago? Chief Corporate Officer Cam Battley said that the culprit was its ancillary noncannabis revenue, where Aurora has “less visibility” into the performance of the businesses. He noted that Aurora’s core cannabis revenue of CA$95 million came in at the top of its guidance range.

Chief Financial Officer Glen Ibbott added that Aurora manages its ancillary businesses “at arm’s length.” He stated that the revenue from these businesses ended up being lower than initially expected.

Battley admitted that the revenue miss “shouldn’t have happened.” Ibbott also acknowledged that Aurora needed to improve its forecasting ability for its ancillary businesses. In the meantime, he said that the company wouldn’t include anticipated results for these businesses in its future guidance.

As for the failure to achieve positive adjusted EBITDA in Q4 as predicted, Battley said that a big reason behind the miss stemmed from the sluggish opening of retail stores in Canada. Ibbott said that Aurora’s adjusted EBITDA performance remains largely at the mercy of the pace at which the retail infrastructure in key provinces is built out.

These miscues overshadowed what Battley noted was “the largest ever recorded” cannabis revenue not only for Aurora but for any company in the Canadian cannabis industry. And while Aurora didn’t become adjusted EBITDA positive in Q4, the company made significant progress toward that goal. Ibbott stated that the company will achieve positive EBITDA “in the short term, not the long term.”

The one that shall not be named

No one on Aurora’s call mentioned Canopy Growth by name, but there were multiple veiled references to Aurora’s leading competitor.

Ibbott noted that some of Aurora’s peers have recognized some returns for cannabis oil products. He said that Aurora hasn’t experienced this issue. This statement clearly alluded to Canopy Growth’s CA$8 million negative adjustment to revenue in its fiscal 2020 Q1 results.

Battley echoed Ibbott’s comments about returns a little later in Aurora’s conference call. He went further by stating that “consumers are voting with their dollars as to which products they want.” Battley’s view is that Aurora is benefiting from “discrimination by consumers toward higher quality products.” The implication is that Aurora is winning while Canopy is losing because of Aurora’s superior quality.

In addition to taking a few jabs at Canopy Growth, Battley also got a dig in on CannTrust(NYSE:CTST), a Canadian cannabis producer that continues to reel from the fallout of cultivating cannabis in unlicensed grow rooms. In his closing comments during Aurora’s Q4 call, he said that it’s “significant what didn’t happen at Aurora” during the latest quarter, including “no crises, no scandals,” and “no management changes.”

Both Canopy Growth and CannTrust have fired their former CEOs in recent months. Canopy’s woes haven’t been scandals, but Battley would probably like to paint a picture of Aurora’s biggest rival as being in the midst of a crisis of sorts.

What’s next for Aurora

Ibbott hinted that Aurora’s growth rate could slow in its fiscal 2020 first quarter. He said the company is “anticipating a bit of a plateau” between now and the launch of the Cannabis 2.0 market for cannabis derivatives later this year. However, Aurora is expecting that market to be a significant growth opportunity headed into calendar year 2020.

Aurora didn’t reveal any specifics, but the company seems likely to expand into the U.S. hemp CBD market in the near future. CEO Terry Booth said that Aurora is “laser-focused” on the hemp CBD opportunities. Executive Chairman Michael Singer added that the company sees the U.S. market as a big opportunity and that investors should “stay tuned.”

Singer’s advice is a good idea for investors interested in any marijuana stock. There are quite a few changing dynamics at play in Canada, the U.S., and international medical cannabis markets. Aurora’s Q4 miss probably won’t be remembered much if these markets grow like they could. But you can bet there will be plenty more verbal and competitive skirmishes between Aurora and Canopy Growth on the way.

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Pot Stock Aurora Posted a ‘Home Run Quarter’—But Investors Didn’t See it That Way

The Street didn’t get too much of a high from Aurora Cannabis‘ 4th quarter earnings late Wednesday, but the cannabis company is still reporting strong …

The Street didn’t get too much of a high from Aurora Cannabis’ 4th quarter earnings late Wednesday, but the cannabis company is still reporting strong growth.

Aurora’s stock dropped over 9% in premarket trading Thursday. The millennial-favorite pot stock missed earnings expectations, reporting revenues of C$99 million (roughly $75 million) versus their own estimates of C$100-$107 million in August (and even below Wall Street’s). But analysts say not to be worried.

“It’s interesting what the market digests out of this,” Canaccord Genuity’s Matt Bottomley told Fortune. “If they hadn’t had pre-released anything, I think this would be considered a home run quarter.” Despite the miss making investors uneasy, Bottomley believes there were “certainly more positives than negatives.”

It’s pretty clear that Aurora shouldn’t have overshot expectations, but all considered, the pot stock’s quarter was actually not all bad.

In fact, Morningstar’s Kristoffer Inton says as a growth company in a growth industry, “they’re doing what they’re supposed to be doing.” Inton added, “In reality, they may not hit what their guidance is, but it’s not because it’s impossible, it’s just further down the road.”

Earnings suggest a strong core business

Aurora missed revenue expectations by roughly C$1 million on the low end, but actually reported core cannabis revenues of C$95 million—at the top end of their projections of C$90-$95 million (which, to Canaccord Genuity’s Bottomley, is the metric that really matters). That’s a 52% increase from the same quarter last year.

The earnings miss came primarily from Aurora’s ancillary businesses—which, while not insignificant, are not the main drivers of what Aurora is: a cannabis company.

“The topline miss on guidance is disappointing, [but] my view is that that is immaterial to anything fundamental,” Bottomley suggests. “One, because we’re talking about a $1 million miss, and two, it’s the segment of their business that has nothing to do with selling cannabis. I’m not saying the ancillary businesses don’t have value, but it’s not really how the company should be judged in my view.”

What Aurora should be judged on, however, is their much-touted plan to profitability. While the cannabis company previously expected adjusted EBITDA to be positive by the end of the calendar year, Aurora execs suggested on Thursday that they would, instead, be profitable in the near term—what Bottomley calls “a bit of a drag to the story.” He suggests the backtracking on profitability is aimed at tapering expectations if the next two quarters plateau a bit.

But with Aurora’s peers still “a ways away” from profitability, according to Bottomley, the pot company may be better positioned than the markets think. In fact, in the Canadian cannabis market, Aurora is actually pulling ahead of many of the pot powerhouses.

Aurora is growing faster than competitors

The cannabis company is actually among the top performers in Canada right now, with some of the highest revenues ever posted for the industry this quarter. In fact, even major player and competitor Canopy Growth reported revenues roughly 25% below Aurora’s, according to Canaccord Genuity.

“In the Canadian market, I think it’s clear that on a trailing basis, whether you want to call that six months or a year, I think Aurora has outperformed Canopy in terms of what they’re doing in Canada,” Bottomley says. While he suggests that comparing Aurora and Canopy on an overall basis is “apples and oranges,” he does believe Aurora’s domination in Canada and relative proximity toward achieving profitability make it stand out among the large-cap pot stocks.

To boot, Aurora’s stock is up 12% for the year—while Canopy’s is actually down 8% year to date. Other competitors like Cronos and Tilray are also trailing Aurora, with stocks up only 0.6% and down a whopping 56% respectively. And boasting one of the highest gross margins among the group is certainly encouraging for investors.

“Aurora, for now, wants to be the production guy,” Inton suggests. “They’re very focused on being a big, low-cost producer, and it’s already showing—that’s why they have the highest gross margins among the peers.”

High headwinds?

But it’s not all good news for Aurora.

It comes with the turf, but part of Aurora’s earnings miss is due to their dependency on Canada’s regulations. In fact, Inton says the pot company is “too beholden to the pace of the regulatory front” to be able to control earnings more tightly. Aurora’s lack of a strategic partner (like Constellation Brands for Canopy Growth) may end up putting pressure on the company as it aims to expand to the U.S.

“The two big questions are, if and when they find that big partner, because that ultimately will help shape where they expect their strategy to go, and two, how do they enter the U.S. now that they’re saying they want to?” Inton says.

Another thing Aurora has been very clear on is their intention to invest more in vapes and alternative cannabis products. And while Aurora likely won’t have to worry too much just yet, the U.S.’s proposed ban on vapes following a vaping health crisis in the States could be something to watch, as Bottomley suggests investors “should be spooked.”

More must-read stories from Fortune:

—The bull and bear case for investing in WeWork before its IPO

—Are we near a recession? The godfather of the inverted yield curve says it’s “code red”

—How the real time payments revolution is pushing Mastercard beyond cards

—Could Baker Mayfield and Odell Beckham, Jr. be worth more to Cleveland than LeBron?

—Listen to our audio briefing, Fortune 500 Daily

Follow Fortune on Flipboard to stay up-to-date on the latest news and analysis.

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Tech Solves Family Tiffs

Another app, Soundhound, is similar to Shazam in terms of interface, but uses voice technology as well. You can “order” Soundhound verbally in front …

Even when families from ancient times gathered around the fire i(probably inside their caves), there were family arguments and disagreements. In those days, it might have been about the name of the person in the clan over in the next valley who developed a better mammoth killing ax. The problem then was, there were no reference materials to peruse for easy answers to resolving these conflicts. That’s not so today.

Now, almost every person carries a super-powerful computer on their person, almost 24 hours-a-day. It packs more sheer computing power than what it took to put people on the moon. And those computers, called phones, can solve many a family argument with a few simple clicks.

It’s not news that some information sites are more reliable than others. For virtual infallibility in the family info wars, here’s some tried and true online tools to help you out.

Photo: monkeybusinessimages, iStock

Name That Tune

It seems to be a uniquely human dilemma: hearing a song and immediately wanting to identify it for either love or hate purposes. Some people (teens in particular) have an innate knack for tune ID; some cannot keep a beat or carry a tune, but still are curious.

The Shazam app isn’t new, but it’s the best option if you and your family are out and faced with a song title/artist argument. Simply let Shazam “listen” to the song, and it’ll usually instantly spit out what it is.

Another app, Soundhound, is similar to Shazam in terms of interface, but uses voice technology as well. You can “order” Soundhound verbally in front of your annoying teen to deliver the verdict on the song in question.

And for lyric disagreements (aka: when “the girl with kaleidoscope eyes” becomes “the girl with colitis walks by”) try Musixmatch Lyrics, an app with a floating lyric display.

Photo: Image Source, iStock

Just the Facts, Ma’am

In these confusing times of unreliable news sources, finding out the actual facts versus fiction is an ongoing challenge. And winning that challenge against obnoxious drunk Uncle Fred at the Thanksgiving table is a deep and compelling need.

What you require are just the facts. And not facts biased in favor of one political side or another, but the plain, unvarnished ones that used to be the currency of news organizations everywhere.

Politifact is a recommended fact-checker. Focusing on claims made by politicos in the US (because Uncle Fred doesn’t want to talk about the world at large), this site is non-partisan, a refreshing change in this polarized atmosphere. It assiduously checks statements made by politicians, political topics, and more universal news. Plus, there’s a global edition for when Brexit comes up. Politifact is a Pulitzer Prize-winning website and really has top-notch journalistic cred.

Another decent fact-checking source is Snopes. It has a media bias rating of “center,” which is about as unbiased as you’re going to get these days. While it’s associated with Facebook, which makes some suspicious, you can probably suspend your paranoia; Snopes is a trusted source in the fact-checking community.

Photo: track5, iStock

Fact-Checking For Kids

While Snopes and Politifact are just fine for teens, they might be a bit much for younger kids. Luckily, there’s a good app for your younger ones so they can be proven right on occasion, too.

Called Open Secrets, this site is all about the labyrinthine world of political spending, which is ideal for your future econ major.

Reviewed by Common Sense Media, the site gets an educational A+, with a caveat:

“Parents need to know that OpenSecrets.org is an informative site that offers a nonpartisan look at political spending. Users can discover everything from funding of previous political campaigns to a politician’s finances and tax returns,” reports Common Sense Media. “For the most part, the content is kid-friendly, but users can post seemingly unmoderated comments that appear live instantly, so there’s a chance kids could come across argumentative conversations or inappropriate language.”

Photo: skynesher, iStock

Who’s That Character Actor in the Corner?

There’s nothing more stimulating than a good dose of confusion over an actor’s identity; it can either enrich a crappy movie, or ruin a classic good evening of cinema.

The go-to site for these film buff dilemmas is IMDb, the leading site for film info. It has a lot of power and reach, but that’s also its downside.

Make Use Of offers up an alternative: The Movie Database (TMDb). Here’s why (per the site):

“TMDb is an initialism that is almost similar to its more bigger counterpart: IMDb. Both are massive indexes for movie and television information, but The Movie Database differs from the Internet Movie Database in one key aspect: TMDb is completely powered by its community.”

IMDb is owned and operated by the behemoth called Amazon, which isn’t a massive point against the site. But having a viable alternative to Amazon is always handy and worth keeping in mind.

Used Judiciously, These Apps Achieve Peace at Dinnertime

Remember: no one likes a know-it-all. It’s not necessary to be a fast-draw with your phone all the time. Use these tools to shut down drama, enrich your family’s mealtimes, or just for genuine fun (it’s a lot cleaner than food fights).

Then again, the holidays are coming. And nothing satisfies more than a good domestic argument won.

Tech Solves Family Tiffs: Sources

Huffington Post

Make Use Of

Shazam

Common Sense Media

Musixmatch

IMDb

TMDb

Politifact

Snopes

Open Secrets

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