SpaceX Demonstration Mission 2 Launch Coverage

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted …

The .gov means it’s official.

Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

Element AI Does It Better

Element AI, which helps companies improve their operations using AI, raises $151.4M Series B, reportedly at a $625M valuation (@seansilcoff / Globe …

Yesterday, I published an article about a company called Healthy.io. I praised the company for incorporating its .IO domain name within its branding, making it less likely that people will make a mistake when navigating to the startup’s website or sending email to employees. I found an even better example of a company’s wise usage of its ccTLD domain name.

This morning, several tech publications covered the news of a major funding round for a company called Element AI:

Element AI, which helps companies improve their operations using AI, raises $151.4M Series B, reportedly at a $625M valuation (@seansilcoff / Globe and Mail)https://t.co/yYOsqndKy2https://t.co/WS90O3c3Qs

— Techmeme (@Techmeme) September 13, 2019

Like Healthy.io, Element AI also uses a ccTLD domain name: Element.ai. The difference is that Healthy.io incorporates its domain name within the branding but Element AI does not include the dot within its branding.

Because the dot and specifically the .AI aren’t totally clear with Element AI, there could still be some confusion regarding its domain name. Smartly, Element AI also owns its brand match .com domain name as well: ElementAI.com. Whether someone visits Element.ai or ElementAI.com, they will end up on the same, correct website.

Element AI uses its .com domain name for its website, but I think having both of these domain names makes choosing the domain name to use a bit less important. I think they could have stuck with the .AI and forwarded the .com if they wanted to do that. The only risk is that the company doesn’t own the high value Element.com domain name so there would be a possibility for confusion if they uses the .AI as the primary domain name.

The other thing I noticed is the positioning of the “AI” within the logo. I am not sure if it was intentional or not, but by having it in the position they have it, viewers will not accidentally mistake it for the name Elemental.

I think it is wise for non.com users to incorporate their extension or at least the word that makes up the extension within the branding to avoid confusion. Element AI takes it a step further to prevent traffic and email leakage by owning both domain names.

Mifid redux? Esma insists on LEIs for repo collateral

European regulators are turning to an old trick to boost the adoption of legal entity identifiers (LEIs) – a ‘barcode for finance’, designed to improve …
European regulators are turning to an old trick to boost the adoption of legal entity identifiers (LEIs) – a ‘barcode for finance’, designed to improve …

Battery Ventures acquires NJ-based SaaS network provider 1WorldSync

Battery Ventures, a technology-focused investment firm, announced Thursday it has acquired 1WorldSync Holdings, a Ewing-based …

Battery Ventures, a technology-focused investment firm, announced Thursday it has acquired 1WorldSync Holdings, a Ewing-based software-as-a-service network for brands to securely share critical product data.

1WorldSync Holdings was established as a joint venture between GS1 US and GS1 German GmbH. Prior to this deal, GS1 Germany purchased 1WorldSync GmbH from 1WorldSync Holdings. Terms of both deals were not disclosed.

“Since its inception, 1WorldSync has been a pioneer in the competitive product content marketplace by providing customers with solutions that grow cross-channel sales, drive efficient content syndication and enable compliance and product transparency,” 1WorldSync CEO Karin Borchert said. “We look forward to collaborating with Battery Ventures to build on those many successes and believe that this is an exciting time for the growth trajectory of the company.”

“We have been tracking 1WorldSync for many years and have been impressed with its trusted, longstanding reputation in the market,” Morad Elhafed, a Battery general partner, said. “We are excited by the future growth prospects of 1WorldSync’s platform and feel we can provide additional resources to help expand the network and develop new product capabilities, while pursuing complementary acquisitions.”

“We are confident that Battery Ventures is the right partner to help 1WorldSync more nimbly create solutions at the pace and speed that industry and consumers demand,” GS1 US CEO and President Bob Carpenter said. “Additionally, as a neutral, standards organization and unique identification company, GS1 US will be better positioned to solely focus on addressing the growing needs of our members and solution partner network to advance the adoption and use of GS1 Standards.”

“Customer and consumer expectations for rich content vary across Europe and the US,” GS1 Germany CEO Thomas Fell said. “This business separation allows us to further develop our market-specific knowledge and expertise and develop solutions that are specifically tailored to our growing markets.”

Needham & Co. acted as the financial advisor and Locke Lord acted as legal counsel to 1WorldSync. Cooley acted as legal counsel to Battery Ventures and DLA Piper acted as legal counsel to GS1 US and GS1 Germany GmbH.

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Unstoppable Domains raises $4 million to make “uncensorable websites” a reality

… in a cryptocurrency wallet. It’s that crypto twist that makes these domains resistant to seizures or take-down requests—even from law enforcement.

Imagine a digital world in which no website can ever be taken down—and no content can ever be censored—by anyone other than the web domain’s owner.

That’s the vision behind Unstoppable Domains, a San Francisco-based software company using blockchains to register web domains and build “uncensorable websites” that exist beyond the reach of even the most repressive governments. If it succeeds, its technology might even make sending and receiving crypto payments easier, too.

And a recent injection of cash from some big players in the crypto industry is now bringing the company one step closer to making that vision a reality.

On Thursday, Unstoppable Domains announced it secured $4 million in funding in a Series A led by Draper Associates and Boost VC. With cash in hand, the company is now poised to hire the talent it needs to fulfill its mission: “Global free speech.”

“The Internet is not free from censorship in most of the world,” Cofounder and Head of Business Development Bradley Kam said in an interview. “In some countries it’s worse than in others, but the problem is global.”

Kam said that the rise of the Chinese surveillance state and the advent of more advanced forms of monitoring, such as facial-recognition technology and Russia’s attempts to completely control the Internet within its borders, demonstrates that “the need for global free-speech tools is growing fast.”

Tim Draper, managing partner of Draper Associates, echoed Kam’s sentiment in an earlier statement: “By decentralizing domain names, Unstoppable Domains has the potential to spread free speech around the world,” he said.

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In addition to funding from Draper and Boost VC, Unstoppable Domains has also received grants from the Ethereum Foundation and the Zilliqa Foundation to build out its technology. The company uses Zilliqa to create unique “.zil” domain extensions (similar to the more familiar, top-level domain “.com” or “.net” extensions) that are stored in a cryptocurrency wallet. It’s that crypto twist that makes these domains resistant to seizures or take-down requests—even from law enforcement.

“The user controls the domain with their private keys,” said Kam. “No one other than the person holding those keys can take the domain away.”

Websites created through Unstoppable Domains will also make use of the InterPlanetary File System (IPFS) or other decentralized networks for content storage. This combination of decentralized file storage and web domains protected by a private key is what the company claims will lay the foundation for utterly free speech online.

And if that should make anyone uncomfortable, considering the possibility that this technology could be used by criminals or other miscreants for nefarious purposes, Unstoppable Domains CEO Matthew Gould is confident that you need not worry.

“This is the same argument critics originally launched [against] Bitcoin,” he said. “Yes, any technology can be used for criminal purposes; anyone can use them for any purpose. [But] the purpose of decentralized technology is to put power back into end users’ hands—which can be a little scary,” said Gould. “Ultimately, we believe the global good, and the vast majority of usage, will be socially positive.”

Gould said that Unstoppable Domains has been working on its technology since 2017, but his team’s interest in cryptocurrency and its potential for societal change goes back further than that. “We’ve been crypto enthusiasts since 2012 and have believed that crypto payments were too complex to go mainstream,” he said. “Just like IP addresses were replaced with the DNS system, we believe cryptocurrency addresses will be replaced with human-readable names.”

In this vein, blockchain domains are meant to fulfill a dual purpose—beyond just censorship-resistant websites, the domains will also function as a “human-readable” cryptocurrency address. For example, Unstoppable Domains’ users will be able to attach BTC, ETH, and other cryptocurrencies to a “domain.zil” address, and receive payments to that address from other crypto wallets.

The company is currently accepting pre-orders for .zil domain names, with websites and public auctions for domains set to go live in late June. It plans to use its recent round of funding to expand its product team and build integrations with more wallets and exchanges, inching closer to creating what its founders believe is the Internet of tomorrow.

Our decentralized future is “a place where no one with a legitimate point of view can be silenced or restricted from commercial activities,” Gould said. “The future will be a world where no one person or group decides what can and can’t be seen online. Users will choose.”