Kaspersky reveals diagnosis of cyberthreats plaguing the healthcare sector

Kaspersky tags escalating number of cyberthreats as the modern plague haunting the healthcare sector, at the recent 5th CyberSecurity Weekend in …

Kaspersky’s fifth cybersecurity weekend puts spotlight on still unseen attacks against medical and pharmaceutical organisations in APAC.

Content supplied by Kaspersky.

Kaspersky tags escalating number of cyberthreats as the modern plague haunting the healthcare sector, at the recent 5th CyberSecurity Weekend in Yangon, Myanmar.

With the theme “Cybersecurity: Healing the Healthcare Sector”, the conference is set to examine the past, the present, and the future state of the medical industry’s threat landscape. The annual event will be attended by the Kaspersky’s elite researchers, key executives, as well as journalists from 12 Asia Pacific (APAC) countries.

“Data is sick. Confidential medical records being breached, advanced devices turning a human into a bionic man, these ideas have since crossed the bridge between fictional stories and our physical world. They are well within our reality, in Asia Pacific and globally. As rapid digitalisation penetrates the healthcare sector, cybercriminals are seeing more opportunities to attack this lucrative and critical industry, which is honestly not equipped enough to face this virtual danger,” says Stephan Neumeier, Managing Director for Asia Pacific at Kaspersky.

Attacks against hospitals and pharmaceuticals have been happening worldwide, especially in the more advanced countries in the west. The recent years, however, have seen the threat creeping towards APAC. Reports have even projected that the medical industry in the region can incur economic losses of up to USD 23.3 million from cybersecurity incidents.

The Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) revealed last year that out of the 262 data breaches reported under the Australian Notifiable Data Breach (NDB) scheme, 54 came from the private health sector followed by finance (40); legal, accounting and management services (23); private education providers (21) and mining and manufacturing (12).

Singapore, the highly-connected and considered as the technology and business hub of Asia, has suffered four data breaches concerning healthcare organisations in just 12 months. One incident even involved health records of the country’s prime minister. The infamous Wannacry ransomware has also crippled several medical establishments in the region, particularly in China, Hong Kong, and Vietnam.

Senior Security Researcher from GReAT Korea, Seongsu Park gave further insight to healthcare related data from the Darkweb. An example given in his presentation is an Australian based darkweb seller called Ausprdie. This platform is known to sell digital product in exchange for individuals medical data which includes phone numbers.

Ausprdie medical heist from the dark web.

He also noted that medical records can be considered more valuable than a simple credit card. This is because a hospital generally requires a patient’s personal and financial credentials before a check-up or an admission.

“Based on the indications and patterns we have seen and are still seeing on the dark web, the main purpose of the individuals behind these hacking groups is to sell the medical information to another crime group or to any individual who aims to access confidential medical data. It is quite alarming that we are increasingly coming across such active advertisements, which can either mean this illegal practice has turned into a normal type of business or the demand for such attacks are becoming increasingly high,” adds Park.

Leading the team of researchers is Vitaly Kamluk, Head of GReAT APAC at Kaspersky, who zero-in on the readiness of the industry in tackling cyberthreats and its cybersecurity.

“Nuclear fallouts like the one happened after Chernobyl disaster and cyberthreats have something in common. A naked eye cannot see how the radiation from the decades-long incident have been affecting human health until present times. Likewise, the healthcare sector has yet to clearly diagnose the plague that has been causing damage to the industry and potentially affecting human health,” explains Kamluk. “Helen Keller once said that the only thing worse than being blind is having sight but no vision. While being deaf-blind person, she worked very hard and reached unbelievable heights. In cyberspace most of us are deaf-blind, because of invisible nature of the threats. But the question is are we working hard enough to be able to envision how those threats can affect our health and our lives?.”

About Kaspersky

Kaspersky is a global cybersecurity company founded in 1997. Kaspersky’s deep threat intelligence and security expertise is constantly transforming into innovative security solutions and services to protect businesses, critical infrastructure, governments and consumers around the globe. The company’s comprehensive security portfolio includes leading endpoint protection and a number of specialized security solutions and services to fight sophisticated and evolving digital threats. Over 400 million users are protected by Kaspersky technologies and we help 270,000 corporate clients protect what matters most to them. Learn more at www.kaspersky.com.au

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Kaspersky Set To Launch Cloud-Based Solution To Fight Esports Cheating

Kaspersky, an internationally known software security solutions organization, is about to unveil a new cloud-based offering which would make sure …

Kaspersky, an internationally known software security solutions organization, is about to unveil a new cloud-based offering which would make sure there’s fair play in eSports. Kaspersky Anti-Cheat as it’s called is the beta version of the offering. Reports reaching us is that it has been released to the general public.

The offering will assist organizers of tournaments to stop in-game cheating. Without a glitch, it integrates via the eSports API platforms and provides real-time detection of any form of cheating. In addition, it provides automated reports for players who have been given the power to take disciplinary decisions on the rule-breaker.

A report gotten from a survey by Irdeto Global Gaming showed that more than 33% of gamers had cheated one way or the other. Due to the adverse effects of cheating on the reputation and popularity of gaming tournaments, there could pose serious challenges for professional gaming organizations.

These challenges come in the form of reduced income or a fall in the number of prospective partnerships, if cheaters are allowed free reign.

Players are mandated to install the Kaspersky Anti-Cheat as a prerequisite for participation. The software is distributed by the gaming company to ensure fairness. After the software has been installed on the player’s computer, data is collected while the game is running and it will be sent to the Kaspersky Anti-Cheat cloud. The software company then analyses the data to see if there’s any foul play.

At the same time, the referee of the tournament will also get real-time cheat reports through a web interface which will provide technical proof of cheating. Immediate action will not be taken against the player, but the final decision will be left to the tournament organizers and the referee. In addition to ensuring the detection of cheating, the software Kaspersky Anti-Cheat does not in any way hinder user experience as it doesn’t affect the game or cause a traffic overload.

“Fair play is highly important to gamers who strive to show their class and skill. When games like CS:GO, PUBG or DOTA 2 become overloaded with cheaters, honest gamers will either stop playing or even give up the game for good,” said product owner of Kaspersky Anti-Cheat, Anton Selikhov.

“Our solution provides tournament organizers with an opportunity to maintain a stable balance in the gaming community and monitor the progress of their competitions. With the introduction of Kaspersky Anti-Cheat, our company brings over 20 years of relevant experience in fighting malware and cybercrime to a new territory.”

Source:https://europeangaming.eu/portal/latest-news/2019/09/11/53963/kaspersky-to-launch-cloud-based-solution-to-tackle-esports-cheating/

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Fed Kaspersky Ban Made Permanent by New Rules

Fed Kaspersky Ban Made Permanent by New Rules … practice is allowed to have Kaspersky software or services in any of its systems, either.
A new set of regulations converts the government ban on using Kaspersky products from a temporary rule to one that’s permanent.

The Federal Acquisition Regulation Council has published a final, formal regulation that bars government agencies, departments, and bureaus from buying security software and services from Kaspersky Lab. This new rule replaces a temporary regulation that had instructed Federal purchasers on how they should act in abiding with terms of the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act.

The new regulation, spelled out in Sections 1634 (a) and (b) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018, is a blanket prohibition that extends beyond the government itself; no contractor with a government practice is allowed to have Kaspersky software or services in any of its systems, either.

Kaspersky was hit with the prohibition in 2017 because of concerns that it could be serving as a “backdoor” attack surface for agents of Russia’s government. Kaspersky has protested that the regulation is unconstitutional because it targets a single company, not a set of behaviors.

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Kaspersky to Launch Cloud-Based Solution to Tackle eSports Cheating

Globally renowned software security solutions company Kaspersky is going to launch a new cloud-based product that would ensure fair play in …
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Globally renowned software security solutions company Kaspersky is going to launch a new cloud-based product that would ensure fair play in eSports. The beta version of the solution, named Kaspersky Anti-Cheat, has been released.

The product will help tournament organizers prevent in-game cheating. It seamlessly integrates through the API of eSports platforms and offers real-time cheat detection in addition to automated reports for players who have the ability to make disciplinary decisions on the rule-breaker.

According to the latest Irdeto Global Gaming Survey, more than 33% of the gamers have confessed to cheating. Given the negative effect cheating has on the popularity and reputation of gaming tournaments, professional gaming organizations could face challenges, like reduced revenue or number of perspective partnerships, should cheaters continue to be successful in their lack of fair play.

Players must install the Kaspersky Anti-Cheat, which is distributed by the gaming platform. After installation on the player’s computer is complete, game process information is collected, sent to the Kaspersky Anti-Cheat cloud and analyzed for suspicious events.

Simultaneously, the tournament referee will receive real-time cheat reports via a web interface providing technical evidence of cheating without taking any immediate actions upon the player, but leaving the final decision to the referee and tournament organizers. In addition to ensuring cheat detection, Kaspersky Anti-Cheat always puts the user experience first and does not affect the game process or overload traffic.

“Fair play is highly important to gamers who strive to show their class and skill. When games like CS:GO, PUBG or DOTA 2 become overloaded with cheaters, honest gamers will either stop playing or even give up the game for good,” said Anton Selikhov, product owner, Kaspersky Anti-Cheat. “Our solution provides tournament organizers with an opportunity to maintain a stable balance in the gaming community and monitor the progress of their competitions. With the introduction of Kaspersky Anti-Cheat, our company brings over 20 years of relevant experience in fighting malware and cybercrime to a new territory.”

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Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac: Best Parental Controls

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac costs $39.99 per year for one Mac or $59.99 per year for three, although deep discounts are frequently available.

The Russian-based security firm Kaspersky has a complex reputation, but the company’s Internet Security for Mac program is a solid option for those looking to protect their Apple machines. Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac provides excellent system protection from malware and a handful of useful privacy tools, one of which fills a void left by Apple.

While Kaspersky’s system impact is low, other antivirus products had even lesser impacts for faster overall performance, especially during malware scans. But if parental controls matter to you, Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac is a must-consider option.

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac costs and what’s covered

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac costs $39.99 per year for one Mac or $59.99 per year for three, although deep discounts are frequently available. The program supports Macs running macOS 10.12 Sierra or later, with a minimum of 1.2GB of storage available and 2GB of memory.

Antivirus protection

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac uses traditional, signature-based scanning and behavioral-pattern recognition to detect malware. Threat-related data, including newfound malicious or suspicious files, are processed by the Kaspersky Security Network, a voluntary, cloud-based data-collection network that allows the 400 million computers around the world running Kaspersky software to share malware information.

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac also stops malware made for Windows machines. That may seem odd, but Windows malware can find safe harbor on Macs and spread to other machines on local networks.

Antivirus detection

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac’s malware-scanning engine has a generally perfect record for protecting macOS machines.

It caught 100% of malware in tests conducted by the Austrian lab AV-Comparatives in July 2019, and it also caught 100% of malware in German lab AV-Test study in April and May 2018. In fact, Kaspersky stopped 100% of Mac malware in all tests conducted by either lab since the middle of 2017.

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Of the Mac antivirus programs we’ve recently reviewed, Avast Free Mac Security and Bitdefender Antivirus for Mac also netted perfect scores in both AV-Comparatives’ and AV-Test’s most recent evaluations. Norton 360 Deluxe (which AV-Comparatives didn’t test) earned a 100% score from AV-Test.

Security and privacy features

Kaspersky includes the ability to disable your Mac’s webcam, an option that macOS doesn’t itself offer. You’ll have to reenable it in Kaspersky Internet Security if you want to use your webcam again; there’s no way to grant webcam access to some apps while blocking others.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

There’s also a tool to block tracking by websites, which often track your behavior to serve you ads. Since blocking all trackers could break some websites you use, Kaspersky lets you make distinctions among behavioral trackers and trackers used by ad agencies, web-analytics firms and social networks and treat each category differently, as well as letting you white-list websites of whose trackers you approve.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Kaspersky gives you the option of downloading its password manager, but you get only the free version, which is limited to 15 entries for login credentials and confidential documents. Unlocking unlimited entries costs $14.99 per year, which is rather cheap fora paid password manager.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

You’ll also get client software for Kaspersky’s Secure Connection VPN service, but it limits you to 300MB of traffic per day. For $4.99 per month or $29.99 per year, you can get unlimited VPN service, which also allows you to select the location you connect to. As with the password manager, this is inexpensive foran unlimited VPN service. (Norton 360 Standard and 360 Deluxe each cost more than Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac, but their password manager and VPN services are unlimited by default.)

Performance and system impact

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac had a mixed impact on our test system’s performance. We tested this by running our custom Excel VLOOKUP benchmark test, which measures how long a computer takes to match 60,000 names and addresses on a spreadsheet. Our test machine wasa 2017 MacBook Air with a 1.8-GHz Intel Core i5 CPU and approximately 54GB of data stored on a 128GB SSD.

With Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac installed on our MacBook, but without any active scans running, the VLOOKUP test finished in an average of 3 minutes and 38 seconds, 2 seconds longer than without any antivirus software installed. That’s a passive hit of just 1%, which is relatively low and not something you’d probably notice in day-to-day activity.

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Other antivirus products’ passive system impacts ranged from 5% to 0%. That’s the great overall news for Mac users: Most of the time, you’ll never notice that you’ve got antivirus software running.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

You would be more likely to notice the slowdowns created by Kaspersky’s active scans. During full-system scans, the VLOOKUP test finished in an average of 5 minutes and 3 seconds, a performance dip of 41%. That’s close to, but not as bad as McAfee AntiVirus Plus‘ 47% fall (the worst score for the round), while Norton (13%) and Sophos Home Premium (7%) caused less of a slowdown during a full scan.

Kaspersky’s biggest system-impact score came from its Quick Scan, wherein the VLOOKUP test finished in 5 minutes and 28 seconds, a hit of 53%. That’s well above the 5% impact from Sophos and the 16% hit from Norton, and it was the highest among all seven programs we recently reviewed.

Kaspersky full-scan completion time of 41 minutes and 20 seconds doesn’t seem to last forever, like Sophos’ 2-hour, 56-minute time does. Instead, Kaspersky’s showing was similar to the completion time posted by Norton (25:49). Those scores were in the middle of the pack and were longer than the supershort 16-second time from Malwarebytes for Mac Premium and the 4:25 from Bitdefender.

Interface

The main window of Kaspersky Internet Security shows your system’s status — Protected, Requires a Restart or otherwise — and presents four clear buttons: Scan, Update, Privacy and Parental Control.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

While I wish Kaspersky’s home screen had a one-click scan button, this layout is clear enough. Once you click Scan on the home screen, you get a window with every kind of scan you could ask for: a field to drag and drop items to be scanned (or browse for them), as well as buttons for full, quick and scheduled scans.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Next up is Updates, which lets you update your system’s antivirus definitions and check the date of the last update and the last scan. This may not need a whole section, but under an > button, you’ll find the helpful Reports menu that contains a ton of detail, with various scan histories.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

The Privacy section places the controls for webcam and website-tracker blocking up top. Underneath, you find links to Kaspersky’s password manager and VPN.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

This may seem like a small detail, but my favorite part of the Kaspersky Internet Security interface is that the company isn’t constantly pushing the upsells for its password manager and VPN solutions at you, or installing them in the menu bar. Others, including Bitdefender and Avast, do this.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Under Parental Control, Kaspersky has placed a pretty solid set of controls to manage kids’ online experiences. On the left, you get a menu of child profiles, and on the right, you have the account settings, including controls for the pages kids can open, time spent online and the sharing of personal data. (Sophos has offers only parental web filtering.)

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

For a more detailed view of your system’s status, you can click the Open Protection Center button, which will show you five statuses. With these, you can tell if antivirus databases are up to date, if your system is under real-time protection and if your app is activated — the important stuff.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

In the next tab on that screen, you’ll see Recommendations, where Kaspersky urges you to use its browser-based security extensions and sign in to your My Kaspersky online account. The next tab over is News, which contains information such as version-update documentation. This screen is organized in a well-thought-out manner, presenting the most user-relevant information up front and putting lesser stuff near the back.

Installation and support

After purchasing Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac, you install the utility by downloading a small installer file that downloads and installs the whole package. All steps included, it took us approximately 5 minutes to complete the process, which is within the normal, 2-to-10-minute range we saw with Mac antivirus applications.

During the installation process, you can opt out of the Kaspersky Security Network, which collects usage and suspicious-file data for 400 million systems running Kaspersky software. Near the end of the installation, you’ll be directed to the Security & Privacy pane in System Preferences, as system access needs to be explicitly granted in macOS.

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To access technical support, click Help in the menu bar, select Kaspersky Internet Security Support, click My Kaspersky, click Support, click Request Technical Support and log in to My Kaspersky.

Bottom line

With a robust package of special features and an excellent history of malware detection, Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac is one of the best options around. Yet, while Kaspersky provides an especially compelling option for those looking to exert parental controls, we have to give the final nod overall to Bitdefender Antivirus for Mac, which has similarly good malware protection but half the system impact during scans as Kaspersky.

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