See SpaceX’s Crew Dragon Parachutes in Action in This Epic Video Compilation

If a parade of space parachutes popping open is your thing, SpaceX has you covered. The company — which is developing a Crew Dragon spacecraft …

If a parade of space parachutes popping open is your thing, SpaceX has you covered. The company — which is developing a Crew Dragon spacecraft to bring astronauts to the International Space Station — recently released a YouTube video showing a series of successful parachute tests for its spacecraft.

The compilation shows the spacecraft being dropped from anywhere between 8,000 to 50,000 feet (roughly 2,400 to 15,000 meters) using a helicopter, a high-altitude balloon or the back door of a cargo plane. In various high-definition shots, the spacecraft falls through the air, is stabilized by a drogue parachute or two, and then the main parachutes pop open.

Cameras mounted on Crew Dragon show the performance of the three or four main parachutes as the spacecraft drifts to desert ground or — in one case — water. The spacecraft needs to pass a series of qualification tests before NASA and other authorities deem it safe enough to fly astronauts.

Related: SpaceX’s Crew Dragon Demo-1 Test Flight in Pictures

Four Crew Dragon parachutes deploy during a test in this still from SpaceX's video compilation. 

Four Crew Dragon parachutes deploy during a test in this still from SpaceX’s video compilation.

(Image credit: SpaceX)

“More than 25 successful tests have been completed to demonstrate performance in various deployment conditions,” SpaceX saidin the video. (The company did not mention a failed parachute test in April. Both SpaceX’s Crew Dragon and Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner have experienced parachute issues while preparing for commercial flights.)

While the SpaceX video focused on parachute deployment, SpaceX is pursuing many other tests to pursue its human-rating qualification for the Crew Dragon. One of these trials was putting an uncrewed spacecraft in space. The first Crew Dragon launched successfully on March 2 and later berthed with the International Space Station. Boeing’s spacecraft will do a space test of its own later this year, if all goes to plan. Launches of astronauts on both spacecraft may follow late this year, or in 2020.

Follow Elizabeth Howell on Twitter @howellspace. Follow uson Twitter @Spacedotcomand on Facebook.

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Elon Musk’s SpaceX spreading its footprint in Florida

Elon Musk’s SpaceX Opens a New Window. is spreading its wings in Florida so it can launch more space missions for its reuseable Starship rocket.

What the launch of the Boeing Atlas V rocket, with the Starliner capsule, will be like

The Boeing Atlas V rocket will carry the Starliner capsule into space, this is what the launch will be like.

Elon Musk’s SpaceX is spreading its wings in Florida so it can launch more space missions for its reuseable Starship rocket. Reuters reported the details after viewing the plans.

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The eccentric billionaire, who also runs Tesla and Solar City, plans to launch the Starship 24 times a year to Luna and Mars, according to the report. The launchpad 39A at Kennedy Space Center is also where the historic Apollo lunar missions originated from.

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“They’re moving very fast,” Dale Ketcham, vice president of government relations at Space Florida, the state’s commercial space development agency told Reuters. “This is actually getting closer to what Elon got into this business for to begin with. This is fundamental infrastructure to get to Mars, the early stages of it.”

Last month the nation celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Apollo which has inspired a new generation of billionaires to compete in their own space race. Virgin Group Founder Richard Branson, just last month, announced his spaceflight company Virgin Galactic will be merging with Social Capital Hedosophia (SCH) to create the world’s first publicly traded commercial human spaceflight company.

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Virgin Galactic and the public investment firm agreed to a stock and cash deal — with SCH owning a 49 percent stake of the merged company. SCH’s founder will also invest $100 million at $10 per share, Branson’s company said in a news release. The company plans to offer commercial space flights, charging customers nearly $250,000 for a 2.5 hour flight.

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The New Spacesuit, Docking Port And Supplies Were Delivered To Space Station

A break in thunderstorms streaming throughout Central Florida allowed a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon cargo capsule to blast off Thursday …

A break in thunderstorms streaming throughout Central Florida allowed a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon cargo capsule to blast off Thursday from Cape Canaveral in pursuit of the International Space Station with a brand new docking mechanism, a spacesuit and 40 mice acting as excessive-flying analysis specimens.

Flying off Cape Canaveral’s Complex 40 launch pad with 1.7 million pounds of thrust, the Falcon 9 rocket turned to the northeast and soared into space over the Atlantic Ocean.

Liftoff occurred at 6:01:56 p.m. EDT (2201:56 GMT) Thursday on the 73rd flight of a Falcon 9 rocket since SpaceX’s workhorse launcher debuted in June 2010.

SpaceX called off a launch attempt on Wednesday as a result of the risk of lightning at Cape Canaveral. The corporate previously ordered a three-day delay from a July 21 target launch date to restore a liquid oxygen leak on the rocket.

Dangerous climate threatened once more in Thursday to stop the Falcon 9 from launching. However, the clouds cleared within the final hour of the countdown.

Nine Merlin 1D engines, chugging kerosene and liquid oxygen propellants, pushed the Falcon 9 rocket into the higher atmosphere in less than two-and-a-half minutes. The first stage booster switched off its engines and separated to start a collection of maneuvers to reverse course and return to landing at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station a couple of miles south of the launch pad. The booster launched and recovered on Thursday helped carry SpaceX’s most recent Dragon cargo mission aloft in May. NASA and SpaceX might use the identical rocket once more for the next Dragon resupply mission, set for launch in December.

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SpaceX to try and launch Dragon capsule Thursday after being scrubbed

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (FOX 35 ORLANDO) – After being scrubbed due to weather on Wednesday, SpaceX will try to launch again Thursday night.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (FOX 35 ORLANDO) – After being scrubbed due to weather on Wednesday, SpaceX will try to launch again Thursday night.

The company says it will attempt another launch at 6:01 p.m. The rocket will carry a Dragon cargo capsule for a supply run to the International Space Station.

When the Dragon capsule blasts off from Cape Canaveral, some unusual items will be hitching a ride to the International Space Station: Nickelodeon slime and an Adidas soccer ball. There will be more than 5,000 pounds of supplies and experiments for the International Space Station.

The slime, which was made famous on several Nickelodeon shows including ‘You Can’t Do That on Television’ and ‘Double Dare’ is being sent into space for educational purposes.

The astronauts will record video of how the slime moves in microgravity. The motion of the Adidas soccer ball will be observed and measured in microgravity to understand “the general behavior of free-flying objects. This could contribute to better design and use of free-flying objects such as small robots in spacecraft,” said NASA.

Experts fear that stormy weather forecast for Florida’s Space Coast could delay liftoff.

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SpaceX’s Starhopper test aborted seconds after starting

On the evening of July 24th, SpaceX was supposed to conduct the Starhopper’s — its Starship prototype vehicle made for very short flights or “hops”– …

The Starhopper was supposed to lift off for a short flight — 65 feet in the air, to be precise. However, the prototype vehicle didn’t move after its rocket shot out flames and smoke. The test was supposed to happen last week, but it was pushed back because Starhopper was engulfed in flames during an engine fire test. SpaceX conducted successful hop tests in the past that proved the Starhopper works and can lift a few inches from the ground. It’s not entirely clear if the mishap last week has anything to do with what happened during its latest attempt.

SpaceX certification engineer Kate Tice only explained during the webcast: “It appears as though we have had an abort on today’s test. As you can see there, the vehicle did not lift off today.” She added: “This specific test is one in a series of tests, designed to push the limits of the vehicle as quickly as possible, to learn all that we can as fast and safely as we can.” That sounds like we’ll definitely see more hop tests in the near future despite this setback.

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