Bonney Lake Walmart’s robot zips along in tech revolution that’s raising big questions for workers

The San Diego-based tech company that makes the Auto-C robot, called Brain Corp, also provides the software that powers autonomous floor …

BONNEY LAKE, Pierce County — When an autonomous floor scrubber was rolled out in Walmart’s Bonney Lake store last month, shoppers mistook the teal blue scrubber zipping down the aisles for a runaway machine, said manager David Klein. “Some customers are a little freaked out.”

Klein said the Auto-C robot has relieved his employees of several hours of cleaning every evening, and has allowed him to avoid hiring another maintenance worker on the previously understaffed team. The 4-foot-tall scrubber, which resembles a riding lawn mower but is considerably quieter, uses sensors to scan its environment and to avoid people or objects in its way.

The San Diego-based tech company that makes the Auto-C robot, called Brain Corp, also provides the software that powers autonomous floor cleaners at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.

At Walmart, the automated machines are just part of a push to bring this pioneer of big-box discounting into the future of brick-and-mortar retail, with implications for its workforce that are still unknown.

Last month the retail giant said it plans to spend $36 million on the remodeling of seven Washington stores, as well as the deployment of autonomous floor scrubbers, dozens of FAST unloaders akin to smart conveyor belts, and 16-foot-tall vending machines called pickup towers that dispense products ordered online.

Rivals such as Kroger and Seattle-based Amazon — which acquired Whole Foods in 2017 and launched a still-small chain of cashierless convenience stores called Amazon Go — have pushed Walmart to compete for customers by rolling out automated technology that offers convenience while keeping prices low. Meanwhile, the low unemployment rate and low corporate tax rate has spurred it to raise wages, increasing the allure of automation.

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Artificial intelligence technology also allows the machine to map the layout of the store during a training ride and to continuously adapt to its surroundings, according to Brain Corp. But the machine occasionally needs help from humans, so it has a seat that is cordoned off by yellow straps in case the robot runs into an obstacle it can’t outmaneuver and a Walmart worker needs to put it into manual mode.

At rest in the back room of Walmart, the new autonomous floor scrubber stands near three manual ones that have been retired, their surfaces speckled with dirt and hoses haphazardly strewn about the handles. Klein said he plans to sell them.

The new automated floor scrubbers at Walmart are kind of like a giant Roomba, replacing the manual push versions seen to the right. They roam the store autonomously, stopping and steering around customers. The upgrades are part of a $36 million investment in new technologies and upgrades to Walmarts in Washington state. (Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)The new automated floor scrubbers at Walmart are kind of like a giant Roomba, replacing the manual push versions seen to the right. They roam the store autonomously, stopping and steering around customers. The upgrades are part of a $36 million investment in new technologies and upgrades to Walmarts in Washington state. (Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)
The new automated floor scrubbers at Walmart are kind of like a giant Roomba, replacing the manual push versions seen to the right. They roam the store autonomously, stopping and steering around customers. The upgrades are part of a $36 million investment in new technologies and upgrades to Walmarts in Washington state. (Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)

Nearby, a conveyor belt churns as it scans boxes of items coming off a truck. It spots the product codes and separates the items into piles for workers to quickly restock the shelves.

According to a recent report by research firm CB Insights, “as the lines between physical and digital retail continue to blur,” retailers are increasingly experimenting with automated checkout technology, relying on AI to manage inventory and using brick-and-mortar stores as fulfillment centers for online orders. For workers, said labor law professor Charlotte Garden of Seattle University’s School of Law, the question is whether the expanded automation will mean they are redirected to other tasks or some of their hours are eventually cut.

Klein said the innovation investments are making employees’ jobs easier and increasing store revenue. The FAST unloader has increased the availability of items on shelves by 2%, which he estimates has resulted in the store gaining an additional $1,000 to $2,000 a day in sales.

Despite the new unloading technology, the Bonney Lake location has actually added 200 additional hours to the afternoon and evening stocking team shift since January as the company pivots toward constantly replenishing the shelves, Klein said. Previously, employees struggled to restock the depleted shelves during the day.

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But it actually takes employees longer to unpack the trucks with the automated machine than it did during the days of manual unloading, he admitted. “The goal of this is not to unload faster,” Klein said as a case of popcorn whirled past on the conveyor belt. “[It’s] to get product to the floor faster.”

No employees have lost hours or changed positions in the past four months due to the rollout of new technology, Klein said. Other aspects of Walmart’s online push have meant hiring: Thirteen workers have been hired at the Bonney Lake location, and nationally, 40,000 online grocery personal shoppers have been added to stores since 2017. An hourly manager and assistant manager have also been hired to lead the Bonney Lake location’s e-commerce team, whose roles include fetching items for the pickup tower, personal shopping and curbside pickup.

“We’ve always been a company that’s all about saving customers money,” said Walmart spokeswoman Tiffany Wilson. She said the technology initiatives are automating tasks workers don’t want to do, and the company is “then upleveling their jobs, upleveling their skills and empowering our associates with technology so that they can then, in turn, serve our customers a lot better.”

Labor-law expert Garden isn’t surprised that employee hours are increasing during the initial deployment of technology, when they need additional training. “If I were to make a prediction about the medium term, I’d anticipate that the pickup towers could result for more work for employees,” because they have to load the machine, and also help customers use it. The unloader and floor scrubber devices “will result in either less or different work for employees,” she predicted. Employees who now do those jobs might be redirected to do different things, including running and troubleshooting the machines, “or they might see their hours cut.”

Rapid deployment of new technology can be “slow and painful,” and because “new tasks require new skills … a mismatch between skills and technologies is bound to complicate the adjustment process,” wrote MIT professor of economics Daron Acemoglu and Boston University assistant professor of economics Pascual Restrepo in a paper last year on “Artificial Intelligence, Automation and Work.”

Andrea Dehlendorf, co-executive director of Organization United for Respect, a nonunion group of Walmart employees, fears that Walmart’s innovations will disempower workers. She said technology could be introduced to help workers “really do the work, take care of the customers and do things better, but instead it is being introduced just to leverage cost savings instead of reinvesting that money in the workforce and paying the people who stay more.”

The advocacy group did an online survey asking Walmart employees how they felt about the rollout of new technology and automation in their stores. “Not one person said that the technology is going to make my job easier,” Dehlendorf said. One worker even commented on the survey that “they’re just trying to replace us all and don’t care if we die.”

Accomplishing economic stability when incorporating technology into the workforce is the major challenge of our time, said Dehlendorf. “We need to make sure that as technology is integrated into work that it’s doing it for the benefit of working people and that it’s doing it for the benefit of humans in our society, not just the … corporations or the shareholders.”

Unionizing has historically provided the main avenue for employees to claim a stake in the transformation of their jobs, according to labor law professor Garden. Walmart, by contrast, has long drawn criticism from labor unions for shutting down stores where employees have attempted to unionize.

“If Walmart was unionized, it would have to bargain with its employees’ union about these changes,” Garden said about the deployment of automated machines. “As it is, Walmart can implement them unilaterally, and employees’ main recourse if they don’t like what is happening is to quit.”

Along with the deployment of artificial intelligence technology in Walmart stores have come privacy concerns. In an Intelligent Retail Lab it is testing in a Walmart on Long Island, thousands of high-resolution cameras monitor shelves so workers can restock items, reported The Associated Press.

At the Bonney Lake store, the rollout of the automatic scrubber and unloader will be joined in the autumn by a robot that scans shelves to determine item availability and identify incorrect prices. The machine, called Auto-S and made by San Francisco-based robotics startup Bossa Nova, drives autonomously through aisles and uses a 3-D camera that gives it a computerized view of its surroundings.

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The shelf scanner only gathers information about products and the cameras are turned off once it encounters humans, said Bossa Nova co-founder and chief business officer Martin Hitch. “In order for our cameras to work we have to shine bright lights and those lights are dazzling, so when we see a human we turn everything off to ensure that we’re not shining lights on them,” Hitch said.

The pickup tower in the Bonney Lake Walmart is a tall, newly installed orange beacon, beckoning online shoppers to unlock their purchases inside. It’s manually loaded by Walmart crew members after a shopper places an order. Larger orders are placed in the lockers to the left or kept in the back. The tower activates upon approach and opens when the shopper scans their mobile device. The upgrades are part of a $36 million investment in new technologies and upgrades to Walmarts in Washington state (Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)The pickup tower in the Bonney Lake Walmart is a tall, newly installed orange beacon, beckoning online shoppers to unlock their purchases inside. It’s manually loaded by Walmart crew members after a shopper places an order. Larger orders are placed in the lockers to the left or kept in the back. The tower activates upon approach and opens when the shopper scans their mobile device. The upgrades are part of a $36 million investment in new technologies and upgrades to Walmarts in Washington state (Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)
The pickup tower in the Bonney Lake Walmart is a tall, newly installed orange beacon, beckoning online shoppers to unlock their purchases inside. It’s manually loaded by Walmart crew members after a shopper places an order. Larger orders are placed in the lockers to the left or kept in the back. The tower activates upon approach and opens when the shopper scans their mobile device. The upgrades are part of a $36 million investment in new technologies and upgrades to Walmarts in Washington state (Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)

The company plans on sticking to robots that identify inaccuracies, and not ones that replace humans by also restocking the shelves, he added. “We’re decades away from a robot being as fast and dexterous as a human. So ours becomes a symbiotic relationship — we find the problem, the human fixes the problem.”

Kristi Branstetter, a Walmart employee in Blue Springs, Missouri, said a sense of paranoia has permeated the store following the introduction of a FAST unloader, pickup tower and shelf scanner several months ago.

“People are really worried about losing their jobs because we have this technology,” Branstetter said. But the limited capabilities of the automated machines have actually increased her workload, she said. Branstetter said she has not received additional hours of work, and yet she feels more pressure to pick up the slack.

The Blue Springs employees’ concerns about looming job loss are symptomatic of national trends. According to U.S. Labor Department data released last month, 49,000 retail jobs have been lost in the past year.

But Branstetter doesn’t share her co-workers’ concerns about imminent unemployment: “I don’t really see where the technology is really beneficial. I just think it kind of adds more work for everybody.”

Melissa Hellmann: mhellmann@seattletimes.com;on Twitter: @M_Hellmann.Seattle Times coverage of artificial intelligence issues is funded by a grant from the MIT/Harvard Ethics and Governance of AI Initiative.

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Robot Software Market Comprehensive Study Including Major Key Players- IBM, ABB, Nvidia …

Some of the key players profiled in the study are IBM, ABB, Nvidia, Cloudminds, Liquid Robotics, Brain Corp, Aibrain, Furhat Robotics, Neurala, …

A new business intelligence report released by HTF MI with title “Global Robot Software Market Insights, Forecast to 2025” has abilities to raise as the most significant market worldwide as it has remained playing a remarkable role in establishing progressive impacts on the universal economy. The Global Robot Software Market Report offers energetic visions to conclude and study market size, market hopes, and competitive surroundings. The research is derived through primary and secondary statistics sources and it comprises both qualitative and quantitative detailing. Some of the key players profiled in the study are IBM, ABB, Nvidia, Cloudminds, Liquid Robotics, Brain Corp, Aibrain, Furhat Robotics, Neurala, Energid Technologies, H2o.AI & Oxbotica.

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Market Overview of Global Robot Software

If you are involved in the Global Robot Software industry or aim to be, then this study will provide you inclusive point of view. It’s vital you keep your market knowledge up to date segmented by Applications [Industrial robots & Service robots], Product Types [, Recognition software, Simulation software, Predictive maintenance software, Data management and analysis software & Communication management software] and major players. If you have a different set of players/manufacturers according to geography or needs regional or country segmented reports we can provide customization according to your requirement.

This study mainly helps understand which market segments or Region or Country they should focus in coming years to channelize their efforts and investments to maximize growth and profitability. The report presents the market competitive landscape and a consistent in depth analysis of the major vendor/key players in the market.

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Historical year – 2013-2017

Base year – 2018

Forecast period** – 2018 to 2023 [** unless otherwise stated]

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The titled segments and sub-section of the market are illuminated below:

The Study Explore the Product Types of Robot Software Market: , Recognition software, Simulation software, Predictive maintenance software, Data management and analysis software & Communication management software

Key Applications/end-users of Global Robot SoftwareMarket: Industrial robots & Service robots

Top Players in the Market are: IBM, ABB, Nvidia, Cloudminds, Liquid Robotics, Brain Corp, Aibrain, Furhat Robotics, Neurala, Energid Technologies, H2o.AI & Oxbotica

Region Included are: United States, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia & India

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– Changing market dynamics of the industry

– In-depth market segmentation by Type, Application etc

– Historical, current and projected market size in terms of volume and value

– Recent industry trends and developments

– Competitive landscape of Robot Software market

– Strategies of key players and product offerings

– Potential and niche segments/regions exhibiting promising growth

– A neutral perspective towards Robot Software market performance

– Must-have information for market players to sustain and enhance their market footprint

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Major Highlights of TOC:

Chapter One: Global Robot Software Market Industry Overview

1.1 Robot Software Industry

1.1.1 Overview

1.1.2 Products of Major Companies

1.2 Robot Software Market Segment

1.2.1 Industry Chain

1.2.2 Consumer Distribution

1.3 Price & Cost Overview

Chapter Two: Global Robot Software Market Demand

2.1 Segment Overview

2.1.1 APPLICATION 1

2.1.2 APPLICATION 2

2.1.3 Other

2.2 Global Robot Software Market Size by Demand

2.3 Global Robot Software Market Forecast by Demand

Chapter Three: Global Robot Software Market by Type

3.1 By Type

3.1.1 TYPE 1

3.1.2 TYPE 2

3.2 Robot Software Market Size by Type

3.3 Robot Software Market Forecast by Type

Chapter Four: Major Region of Robot Software Market

4.1 Global Robot Software Sales

4.2 Global Robot Software Revenue & market share

Chapter Five: Major Companies List

Chapter Six: Conclusion

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Key questions answered

• Who are the Leading key players and what are their Key Business plans in the Global Robot Software market?

• What are the key concerns of the five forces analysis of the Global Robot Software market?

• What are different prospects and threats faced by the dealers in the Global Robot Software market?

• What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors?

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RightHand Robotics debuts a new pick and place system

The company has managed to drum up $34 million in funding from investors like Menlo Ventures, GV and Playground Global. This week at the ProMat …

Reliable pick and place systems have long been a kind of Holy Grail among industrial robotics. The job of moving products in and out of bins is high among the jobs that many warehouse and fulfillment centers are looking to automate.

For a few years now, RightHand Robotics has been one of the more exciting startups in the space. The company has managed to drum up $34 million in funding from investors like Menlo Ventures, GV and Playground Global. This week at the ProMat conference in Chicago, the company unveiled RightPick2, the second generation of its piece-picking solution.

The news comes as the company notes that the previous version of its platform has crossed the 10 million pick threshold. This latest version features a number of upgrades on both the hardware and software fronts.

That list includes the fifth generation of the industrial gripper, which is capable of lifting up to 2 kg, coupled with new depth-sensing cameras from Intel and an improved arm from Universal Robots. That’s coupled with improvements to the system’s RightPick.AI vision/motion control software.

The results, as evidenced in the above demo, are pretty impressive. The system is speedy, fluid and capable of picking up a versatile array of different products, while capturing barcodes for order fulfillment in the process.

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It’s Time To Cut The Cord

The recent breaking news story on The Robot Report was, unfortunately, the demise of Helen Greiner’s company, CyPhy Works (d/b/a Aria Insights).

The recent breaking news story on The Robot Report was, unfortunately, the demise of Helen Greiner’s company, CyPhy Works (d/b/a Aria Insights). The high-flying startup raised close to $40 million since its creation in 2008, making it the second business founded by an iRobot alum that has shuttered within five months. While it is not immediately clear why the tethered-drone company went bust, it does raise important questions about the long-term market opportunities for leashed robots.

The tether concept is not exclusive to Greiner’s company, there are a handful of drone companies that vie for market share including FotoKite, Elistair, and HoverFly. The primary driver towards chaining an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is bypassing the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) ban on beyond line of sight operations. Therefore the only legal way to truly fly autonomously, without a FAA waiver, is attaching a cord to the machine. There are a host of other advantages such as continuous power and data links. In the words of Elistair customer Alexandre Auger of Adéole, “We flew 2 hours 45 minutes before the concert and 1 hour after with Elistair’s system. This innovation allowed us to significantly increase our flight time! During our previous missions, we did not have this system and the pressure related to battery life was huge.”

Most of the millions of robots installed around the world are stationary and, thus, tethered. The question of binding an unmanned system to a power supply and data uplink is really only relevant for units that require mobility. In a paper written in 2014 Dr. Jamshed Iqbal stated, “Over the last few years, mobile robot systems have demonstrated the ability to operate in constrained and hazardous environments and perform many difficult tasks. Many of these tasks demand tethered robot systems. Tether provides the locomotion and navigation so that robot can move on steep slopes.” Most robotic companies employed leashes five years ago, even mobility leader Boston Dynamics. However, today Marc Raibert’s company has literally cut the cord on its fleet, proving once and for all that greater locomotion and agility await on the other side of the tether.

Recently, Boston Dynamics unveiled its latest breakthrough for commercializing unhitched robots – freewheeling warehouse-bots. In a video on YouTube! that has already garnered close to a million views, a bipedal wheeled robot named Handle is shown seamlessly palletizing boxes and unloading cartons onto a working conveyor belt. Since SoftBank’s acquisition of Boston Dynamics in 2017, the mechatronic innovator has pivoted from contractor of defense concepts to a purveyor of real-world robo-business solutions. Earlier this year, Raibert exclaimed that his latest creations are “motivated by thinking about what could go in an office — in a space more accessible for business applications — and then, the home eventually.” The online clip of Handle as the latest “mobile manipulation robot designed for logistics” is part of a wider marketing campaign leading up to ProMat 2019*, the largest trade show for supply chain automation held in Chicago later this month.

According to the company’s updated website, Handle, the six foot two-hundred pound mechanical beast, is “A robot that combines the rough-terrain capability of legs with the efficiency of wheels. It uses many of the same principles for dynamics, balance, and mobile manipulation found in the quadruped and biped robots we build, but with only 10 actuated joints, it is significantly less complex. Wheels are fast and efficient on flat surfaces while legs can go almost anywhere: by combining wheels and legs, Handle has the best of both worlds.” The video is already creating lots of buzz on social media with Evan Ackerman of IEEE Spectrum tweeting, “Nice to see progress, although I’ve still got questions about cost-effectiveness, reliability, and safety.”

To many in the retail market palletizing is the holy grail for automating logistics. In a study released earlier this month by Future Market Insights (FMI) the market for such technologies could climb to over $1.5 billion by 2022 worldwide. FMI estimated that the driving force behind this huge spike is that “Most of the production units are opting for palletizing robots in order to achieve higher production rates. The factors that are driving the palletizing robots market include improved functionality of such robots along with a simplified user interface.” It further provided a vision of the types of innovations that would be most successful in this arena, “Due to the changing requirements of the packaging industry, hybrid palletizing robots have been developed that possess the flexibility and advantages of a robotic palletizer and can handle complex work tasks with the simplicity of a conventional high speed palletizer. Such kind of palletizing robots can even handle delicate products and perform heavy-duty functions as well, apart from being simple to use and cost effective in operations.” Almost prophetic in its description, FMI described Handle’s free-wheeling demonstration weeks before the public release by Boston Dynamics.

The mantra for successful robot applications is “dull, dirty and dangerous.” While advances like Handle continue to push the limits of mobility for the “dull” tedious tasks of inventory management, “dirty and dangerous” use cases require more continuous power than ninety minutes. By example, tethered machines have been deployed in the cleanup efforts of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant since the tsunami in March 2011. The latest invention released is a Toshiba robot packed with cameras and sensors that include “fingers” for directly interacting the deposits of the environment enabling deeper study of radioactive residue. In explaining the latest invention, Jun Suzuki of Toshiba said, “Until now we have only seen those deposits, and we need to know whether they will break off and can be picked up and taken out. Touching the deposits is important so we can make plans to sample the deposits, which is a next key step.”

The work of Suzuki and his team in creating leashed robots in disaster recovery has already spilled over to new strides for underwater and space exploration. The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency announced a partnership with GITAI to build devices for the International Space Station. In the words of GITAI’s CEO, Sho Nakanose, “GITAI aims to replace astronauts with robots that can work for a long time while being remotely controlled from Earth while in low Earth orbit space stations to reduce the burden on astronauts, shorten the time it takes to perform work in space, and reduce costs.”


Reprinted by permission.

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Robotics Market Insights 2019 : KUKA AG , Adept Technology (Acquired by OMRON), iRobot …

Robotics Market Insights 2019 : KUKA AG , Adept Technology (Acquired by OMRON), iRobot Corporation , Intuitive Surgical , Nachi-Fujikoshi , …

Service Robotics Market Overview

The global service Robotics market was valued at over US$ 9 Billion in 2017. Service robots have witnessed widespread acceptance among various professional and personal applications owing to benefits such as enhanced usability, delivery of accurate and high-quality services, reliability, and reduced operational costs and human errors. Professional service robots are employed in various industries including medical, defense, rescue and security, agriculture, logistics, construction, and professional cleaning among others, whereas personal service robots are used for domestic and entertainment and leisure purpose.

The global service Robotics market is expected to almost triple by 2024 from the 2017 level, driven by an upsurge in its adoption owing to high labor cost, lack of skilled workforce, increasing research and development investments, growing awareness regarding the benefits of service robots, and increased demand for automation among professional and personal sectors. However, high initial investment and concern for human safety restricts the growth of the market.

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The Global Robotics Market is expected to register a CAGR of 14% over the forecast period of 2018-2024. The demand for Robotics is anticipated to grow exponentially during the forecast period driven by advantages such as cost reduction, improved quality, increased production, and improved workplace health and safety. The adoption of robots across a wide range of industries including manufacturing, healthcare, defense and security, automotive, electronics, and food and beverage has accelerated the growth of the market. Robots deliver better quality products and services more efficiently, with less wastage and without causing physical damage to humans due to their autonomous nature. They help to reduce operating costs, while increasing production output. The increasing use of Robotics will boost the growth of the market in the coming future.

Industrial Robotics Market Overview

The global industrial Robotics market was valued at just over US$ 16 Billion in 2017, and is likely to grow at a double digit CAGR between 2018 and 2024. The demand for industrial Robotics is anticipated to grow exponentially during the forecasting period driven by advantages such as cost reduction, improved quality, increased production, and improved workplace health and safety. The adoption of automation to ensure quality production and meet market demand, and the growing demand from small- and medium-scale enterprises in developing countries is fueling the growth of industrial Robotics market globally.

Top Key Players Covered :

  1. KUKA AG
  2. Adept Technology (Acquired by OMRON)
  3. iRobot Corporation
  4. Intuitive Surgical
  5. Nachi-Fujikoshi
  6. Yaskawa

Electric Corporation Moreover, for the businesses, it is the most important to get knowhow of consumer’s demands, preferences, attitudes and their changing tastes about the specific product which can be studied via this Robotics report. The report also puts light on the various inhibitors as well as motivators of the product market in both quantitative and qualitative approach so that users get accurate information. This Robotics report also presents an analysis of prime manufacturers, trends, opportunities, marketing strategies, market effect factor and consumer needs by major regions, types, and applications worldwide while considering the past, present and future state of the Robotics industry.

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Global Robotics Market and Volume Forecast – By Type

  1. Industrial Robotics
  2. Service Robotics

Global Industrial Robotics Market and Volume Forecast – By Segment

  1. Automotive Industry
  2. Electrical/Electronics Industry
  3. Metal Industry
  4. Chemical, Rubber and Plastics Industry
  5. Food Industry
  6. Others Industry
  7. Unspecified Industry

Research for Markets report titled “Global Robotics Market (By Product Segments, Service Segments, Industry Verticals, Geography, Recent Developments) – Forecast to 2024” provides a comprehensive assessment of the fast-evolving, high-growth Robotics Market.

This 106 Page report with 61 Figures and 5 Tables has been analyzed from 9 viewpoints:

  1. Global Robotics Market & Forecast (2024)
  2. Global Robotics Market Share & Forecast (2024)
  3. By Product Segments – Global Robotics Market & Forecast (2024)
  4. By Service Segments – Global Robotics Market & Forecast (2024)
  5. By Industry Verticals – Global Robotics Market & Forecast (2024)
  6. By Geography – Global Robotics Market & Forecast (2024)
  7. Global Robotics Market – Key Developments
  8. Global Robotics Index 2019
  9. Global Robotics Market – Growth Drivers and Challenges

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