Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board Buys Lyft Inc, Stericycle Inc, Canadian Pacific Railway, Sells …

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board Buys Lyft Inc, Stericycle Inc, Canadian Pacific Railway, Sells SiteOne Landscape Supply Inc, Yext Inc, …

Toronto, A6, based Investment company Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board (Current Portfolio) buys Lyft Inc, Stericycle Inc, Canadian Pacific Railway, IDEX Corp, Mettler-Toledo International Inc, sells SiteOne Landscape Supply Inc, Yext Inc, Mastercard Inc, Energy Select Sector SPDR Fund, BrightView Holdings Inc during the 3-months ended 2019Q2, according to the most recent filings of the investment company, Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board. As of 2019Q2, Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board owns 523 stocks with a total value of $5.2 billion. These are the details of the buys and sells.

For the details of ONTARIO TEACHERS PENSION PLAN BOARD’s stock buys and sells,go to https://www.gurufocus.com/guru/ontario+teachers+pension+plan+board/current-portfolio/portfolioportfolio

These are the top 5 holdings of ONTARIO TEACHERS PENSION PLAN BOARD

  1. Macerich Co (MAC) – 23,286,237 shares, 15.05% of the total portfolio.
  2. Cushman & Wakefield PLC (CWK) – 15,960,277 shares, 5.51% of the total portfolio. Shares added by 0.63%
  3. Lyft Inc (LYFT) – 2,214,316 shares, 2.81% of the total portfolio. New Position
  4. Alphabet Inc (GOOGL) – 82,789 shares, 1.73% of the total portfolio. Shares added by 9.24%
  5. Visa Inc (V) – 476,868 shares, 1.60% of the total portfolio. Shares reduced by 12.19%

New Purchase: Lyft Inc (LYFT)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board initiated holding in Lyft Inc. The purchase prices were between $48.15 and $74.45, with an estimated average price of $60.05. The stock is now traded at around $59.12. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 2.81%. The holding were 2,214,316 shares as of .

New Purchase: Stericycle Inc (SRCL)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board initiated holding in Stericycle Inc. The purchase prices were between $44.45 and $58.39, with an estimated average price of $50.89. The stock is now traded at around $44.77. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 1.45%. The holding were 1,573,064 shares as of .

New Purchase: Futu Holdings Ltd (FHL)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board initiated holding in Futu Holdings Ltd. The purchase prices were between $9.55 and $18.62, with an estimated average price of $12.9. The stock is now traded at around $10.10. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 0.41%. The holding were 2,021,876 shares as of .

New Purchase: Pinduoduo Inc (PDD)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board initiated holding in Pinduoduo Inc. The purchase prices were between $19.03 and $24.67, with an estimated average price of $21.66. The stock is now traded at around $22.60. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 0.3%. The holding were 750,000 shares as of .

New Purchase: ResMed Inc (RMD)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board initiated holding in ResMed Inc. The purchase prices were between $97.37 and $123.27, with an estimated average price of $110.64. The stock is now traded at around $131.40. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 0.19%. The holding were 79,360 shares as of .

New Purchase: CGI Inc (GIB)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board initiated holding in CGI Inc. The purchase prices were between $69.08 and $77.17, with an estimated average price of $72.67. The stock is now traded at around $76.53. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 0.18%. The holding were 122,981 shares as of .

Added: Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd (CP)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board added to a holding in Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd by 111.75%. The purchase prices were between $206.9 and $240.36, with an estimated average price of $223.17. The stock is now traded at around $233.10. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 0.6%. The holding were 250,988 shares as of .

Added: IDEX Corp (IEX)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board added to a holding in IDEX Corp by 97.52%. The purchase prices were between $150.57 and $172.14, with an estimated average price of $156.95. The stock is now traded at around $162.03. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 0.6%. The holding were 364,534 shares as of .

Added: Mettler-Toledo International Inc (MTD)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board added to a holding in Mettler-Toledo International Inc by 87.45%. The purchase prices were between $701.77 and $840, with an estimated average price of $753.44. The stock is now traded at around $702.28. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 0.59%. The holding were 77,687 shares as of .

Added: Zoetis Inc (ZTS)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board added to a holding in Zoetis Inc by 82.53%. The purchase prices were between $97.98 and $114.28, with an estimated average price of $104.6. The stock is now traded at around $125.07. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 0.59%. The holding were 598,744 shares as of .

Added: Canadian National Railway Co (CNI)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board added to a holding in Canadian National Railway Co by 179.06%. The purchase prices were between $88.59 and $94.62, with an estimated average price of $91.89. The stock is now traded at around $93.99. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 0.58%. The holding were 502,021 shares as of .

Added: Becton, Dickinson and Co (BDX)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board added to a holding in Becton, Dickinson and Co by 116.49%. The purchase prices were between $222.84 and $252.23, with an estimated average price of $237.94. The stock is now traded at around $254.35. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 0.56%. The holding were 215,598 shares as of .

Sold Out: BrightView Holdings Inc (BV)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board sold out a holding in BrightView Holdings Inc. The sale prices were between $14.52 and $18.91, with an estimated average price of $16.69.

Sold Out: Heico Corp (HEI)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board sold out a holding in Heico Corp. The sale prices were between $97.75 and $133.81, with an estimated average price of $110.95.

Sold Out: SPDR S&P Bank ETF (KBE)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board sold out a holding in SPDR S&P Bank ETF. The sale prices were between $40.66 and $45.7, with an estimated average price of $43.18.

Sold Out: UGI Corp (UGI)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board sold out a holding in UGI Corp. The sale prices were between $51.21 and $55.39, with an estimated average price of $53.21.

Sold Out: Sonoco Products Co (SON)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board sold out a holding in Sonoco Products Co. The sale prices were between $60.29 and $65.78, with an estimated average price of $63.11.

Sold Out: Worldpay Inc (WP)

Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Board sold out a holding in Worldpay Inc. The sale prices were between $111.23 and $125.41, with an estimated average price of $118.52.

Here is the complete portfolio of ONTARIO TEACHERS PENSION PLAN BOARD. Also check out:

1. ONTARIO TEACHERS PENSION PLAN BOARD’s Undervalued Stocks

2. ONTARIO TEACHERS PENSION PLAN BOARD’s Top Growth Companies, and

3. ONTARIO TEACHERS PENSION PLAN BOARD’s High Yield stocks

4. Stocks that ONTARIO TEACHERS PENSION PLAN BOARD keeps buying

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Credit score UK: How to improve your credit score – why an overdraft could actually help

“Setting up a standing order or a direct debit is a good way to ensure your bills are paid on time each month,” Credit Karma suggested.

There are a number of different things which can affect a credit score, as Credit Karma explains.

This includes payment history, such as paying credit card bills late – which can potentially have a negative impact.

The length of one’s credit history, the types of credit one currently has, and their credit utilisation may also play a part, as can recent credit.

A spokesperson for Credit Karma said of the latter factor: “Creditors may review your credit reports before they make a decision to lend to you.

“In some cases, A hard inquiry can hurt your scores. Usually though, a single hard inquiry has little effect on your score.”

So, how can a person improve their credit score?

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Equifax Cash Settlement Backtracking Leaves a Bad Taste

The FTC should have known that the mere existence of firms like Credit Karma shows the monetary value of credit monitoring to consumers to be $0.

Last month, the Federal Trade Commission, in conjunction with the Consumer Financial Protection Board and all 50 US states, announced a settlement of up to $700 million with Equifax over that company’s 2017 data breach exposing personal information on 147 million Americans. This settlement was different from some previous ones, where the main benefit to victims—if there was any at all—was free credit monitoring. In this case, victims could opt for a cash payment of up to $125 instead of credit monitoring and could apply for additional financial restitution for time wasted dealing with Equifax’s negligence. The FTC said the settlement included up to $425 million to help those affected by the breach.

Unsurprisingly, this was big news, and we in the media responded by publicizing the heck out of it (see “You May Be Entitled to $125 or More in the Equifax Breach Settlement,” 26 July 2019). People responded, with millions signing up for their cash payments: $125 if you already had credit monitoring and $25 per hour for up to 20 hours that you spent dealing with the breach, plus coverage of your out-of-pocket losses up to $20,000. Sounds good, right? Finally, the people who are actually harmed in a data breach are recompensed for their trouble!

That was when the fine print got big. It turns out that the actual settlement caps the $125 alternative reimbursement payments at $31 million, and it caps the claims for lost time at another $31 million. In both cases, if the claims exceed the cap, all payments will be reduced on a prorated basis. So much for that $425 million number.

Within a few days, Robert Schoshinski, Assistant Director in the Division of Privacy and Identity Protection at the FTC, was bluntly encouraging everyone to take the free credit monitoring instead of the payments because millions of people had already signed up for the cash. The FTC also updated the FAQ in its informational page about the settlement to clarify the payment caps and the likelihood that you’d get much less than was promised.

That may be the reality of the situation, but it leaves a bad taste in the mouth for a variety of reasons.

Denial Isn’t Just a River in Egypt

Back in 2017, Equifax’s then-CEO, Richard Smith, apologized in an op-ed in USA Today. But apparently, once such an apology has been published (and the CEO who made it has been sent packing along with the chief information officer and chief information security officer), the company can negotiate a different reality.

The breach settlement site now says:

Equifax denies any wrongdoing, and no judgment or finding of wrongdoing has been made.

It grates to have Equifax—whose negligence resulted in information about 147 million Americans being exposed to criminals—pretending that it did nothing wrong. If it had done everything right, the breach never would have happened in the first place. Hackers are not an “act of god” equivalent to an earthquake or tornado. Equifax should be saying:

We messed up. We manage a vast amount of confidential, potentially damaging information about nearly all Americans, and we failed to protect it. For that, and for any inconvenience, emotional distress, or financial hardship that our negligence caused, we are truly sorry. Here’s how we’re going to make it up to you.

Making the bad taste worse is the fact that those Equifax executives got to “retire” (rather than being fired), which means that they’ll keep their unvested stock compensation. For ex-CEO Richard Smith, that was worth over $90 million.

Fines and Restitution

In the law, there is a difference between a fine and restitution. Fines go to the government prosecuting the crime, whereas restitution goes to the victims of the crime. Since we’re talking about a settlement in which Equifax gets to deny all wrongdoing, there’s apparently no crime in play. Regardless, the settlement includes both. The fines include $175 million to the states and $100 million to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and the restitution is the $425 million directed to repay consumers.

Many of us are angry with the FTC’s settlement because the $31 million caps mean that the initial promise that consumers could get significant cash damages has proven to be false. The FTC should have known that the mere existence of firms like Credit Karma shows the monetary value of credit monitoring to consumers to be $0. Plus, although the credit monitoring also provides identity theft insurance and identity restoration services, Credit Karma suggests that those are not generally worth purchasing on your own. (Happily, Equifax will have to pay other companies to provide these services and can’t benefit in any way from them. So at least the fox’s failure to guard the henhouse isn’t being punished with a chicken dinner.)

The massive interest in those payments shows that the FTC utterly underestimated what consumers actually want in compensation. Perhaps the FTC will adjust its formula the next time this happens, but for now, we just have to swallow our bitter medicine.

We Are the Sausage

The final sour aspect of this situation is the fact that most people never asked to do business with Equifax. We’ve all become concerned about the spread of our personal information and how it can be used against us, but collecting and sharing data about us is Equifax’s core business (as it is for competitors Experian and TransUnion too).

At least the likes of Google and Facebook provide us with services we choose to use in exchange for our data. In comparison, the credit reporting agencies sell our data to other companies with whom we want to do business. They couldn’t care less about us because we’re just raw materials to them. It’s easy to find examples (Equifax, Experian, TransUnion) of them being sued for failing to remove incorrect information, concealing charges, and other violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act. Dealing with pesky consumers is just a cost of doing business.

As the saying goes, if you’re not paying for it, you’re not the customer; you’re the product being sold. And if we’re not customers, there’s certainly no need for customer service.

Of course, the final reason the Equifax breach settlement leaves a bad taste in the mouth is that there’s nothing we can do about any of this other than letting the FTC know that we’re unhappy with how things worked out. Perhaps leave a comment on the agency’s blog post. I can’t see it making any difference, but it might make you feel a little better.

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