Israeli start-up aims to put first private space probe on the moon

Its inspiration sprang not from a government program but from the Google Lunar XPrize, an “American Idol”-like competition that promised $30 million …
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Feb. 14, 2019, 8:06 PM GMT
By Corey S. Powell

Beresheet is the first word of the Hebrew Bible, meaning “in the beginning.” It’s also the apt name of the robotic lander that an Israeli start-up is planning to launch to the moon on Feb. 21.

If the mission succeeds, Beresheet will be the first Israeli spacecraft to travel beyond Earth orbit and the first private lander on the moon. The mission could also mark the beginning of a new spaceflight era — one in which companies go where previously only nations have gone.

John Horack, an aerospace engineer at Ohio State University and a spaceflight expert, is giddy at the possibilities. “Nothing like this has been tried before,” he says. “We’re looking at an entirely new model for space exploration beyond Earth orbit.”

From its funding to its engineering to its modest size (Beresheet is about the size of commercial refrigerator), almost everything about the Israeli probe goes against tradition. Its inspiration sprang not from a government program but from the Google Lunar XPrize, an “American Idol”-like competition that promised $30 million to any private team that could put a lander on the moon, have it travel 500 meters (about 1,600 feet) and send back photos and video documenting its journey.

In 2009, the XPrize captured the imagination of Yonatan Winetraub, at the time a 22-year-old Israeli aerospace engineer who was spending a year at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. He wondered: Why not try out for the moonshot award himself? “Unfortunately, I couldn’t find people who were crazy enough to follow my idea,” he says.

When Winetraub returned to Israel, he met two kindred spirits, computer engineer Yariv Bash and entrepreneur Kfir Damari. “The three of us sat down in a bar in the suburbs of Tel Aviv, and as the alcohol level went up we were becoming more and more determined to do this thing,” he recalls. That was when the trio founded SpaceIL, the nonprofit that created Beresheet.

It’s been high drama ever since. SpaceIL submitted its proposal to the XPrize committee just 45 minutes before the Dec. 31, 2010, deadline. The first three concepts for Beresheet failed their engineering evaluations, teaching SpaceIL painful lessons in how to get the most out of every drop of fuel. And when the XPrize competition expired last year without a winner, SpaceIL had to scramble for funds to complete its lander.

Now Beresheet is at Cape Canaveral in Florida, less than two weeks away from its scheduled liftoff aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.

Like an Uber to orbit

From the start, SpaceIL and its partner, Israel Aerospace Industries, have struggled against a major handicap: They had never worked on a moon mission before. Every component of the lander presented a fresh challenge, especially as the engineers struggled to keep the craft lightweight and on budget.

In its final form, Beresheet weighs 350 pounds, not counting a half-ton of onboard propellant. The mission costs add up to $95 million, much of it underwritten by Morris Kahn, an Israeli telecom billionaire and philanthropist.

For comparison, NASA’s last robotic moon lander was Surveyor 7 all the way back in 1968. It weighed twice as much as Beresheet, and the Surveyor program cost $3.5 billion in current dollars (although that covered seven separate missions).

Beresheet is a secondary payload on its SpaceX rocket, meaning it’s tagging along on a launch for another SpaceX customer. Winetraub likens the arrangement to an Uber rideshare: The other customer takes up most of the space on the rocket and so pays for most of the launch.

That ride will take Beresheet only as far as Earth’s orbit. From there, it will have to fire its own small rockets and navigate three circuitous loops around Earth and two around the moon before landing on Mare Serenitatis, a volcanic plain on the north-central part of the lunar nearside.

“In the Apollo days they got to the moon within two days, but it will take us about one and a half months,” Winetraub says. “That’s how it is if you don’t want to pay full price.”

Mapping the moon with magnets and lasers

Once Beresheet reaches the moon in April, its onboard magnetometer will measure the subtle magnetic field embedded in the lunar surface. According to Oded Aharonson, of Israel’s Weizmann Institute of Science, the lead scientist for the experiment, the observed pattern of magnetism should reveal what conditions were like more than 4 billion years ago, when molten rock cooled and solidified to form the moon’s outer layers.

“Our ultimate aim is to create a profile of the magnetic field of the moon and understand its origin,” Aharonson said in a statement.

Beresheet also carries a device that reflects light in the exact same direction it arrived, regardless of the angle. NASA already has several of these so-called retroreflectors on the lunar surface; scientists bounce laser beams off them to measure the moon’s exact orbit.

But the SpaceIL team has something more adventurous in mind.

Future spacecraft approaching the moon could use retroreflectors like a lunar GPS, Winetraub explains, pinging them with a laser to establish reference positions. Beresheet will add to that fledgling navigation network. “If you go to the moon and want to know where you are, you’ll no longer need to count on a ground station on Earth,” Winetraub says. “You can just shoot lasers down.”

After landing, Beresheet may also execute a short hop using an onboard rocket. Such a move would snag more magnetic readings but would run the risk that the lander could tip over or explode. The SpaceIL team is deadlocked over whether to take the gamble.

The private space wave

Though it has yet to leave the launch pad, Beresheet is already sending shock waves through the world of space exploration. India’s space agency is preparing its own moon lander, Chandrayaan-2, prompting a flurry of news stories about which nation’s flag will adorn the first nonsuperpower mission to achieve a lunar landing.

Chandrayaan-2 is scheduled to launch in April, several weeks after Beresheet, but it will follow a shorter, more direct trajectory. The two spacecraft could be in transit to the moon simultaneously, according to Winetraub, and it’s not clear which one would touch down first.

“I think that will be pretty exciting,” Winetraub says. To the SpaceIL team and other advocates of private spaceflight, fostering a start-up culture in space exploration takes precedence over national pride and bragging rights.

“Even if it is not successful, Beresheet may have a notable impact,” Horack says. “It will help future entrepreneurs adopt the things that work, avoid the things that didn’t work and get a better perspective on how they might operate a company that involves travel to the moon.”

Winetraub agrees, saying, “We’re just a small part in this huge wave of privatization.” NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine recently promised a NASA-supported commercial moon landing “by the end of 2020,” possibly in partnership with another former XPrize contestant. And OHB, an aerospace company in Bremen, Germany, is partnering with SpaceIL to pitch a similar project to the European Space Agency.

Winetraub is also dreaming of grander endeavors, like a private mission to Oumuamua, the mysterious interstellar object that flew through the solar system in 2017. “I want people to say: ‘Let’s go see if it has anything to do with aliens. Let’s figure it out.’ I think people will be encouraged to do things like that, now that they know private space missions are possible.”

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Space Mining Market Growth Analysis and Industry Development 2019 – Dominated By Deep …

Space Mining Market Growth Analysis and Industry Development 2019 – Dominated By Deep Space Industries Inc., Planetary Resources, Moon …

Global Space Mining Market is expected to rise from its initial estimated value of USD 0.56 billion in 2018 to an estimated value of USD 3.28 billion by 2026, registering a CAGR of 24.7% in the forecast period of 2019-2026. This growth can be attributed to the high number of space missions currently taking place and the upcoming space missions too.

This report studies the Global Space Mining Market size, industry status and forecast, competition landscape and growth opportunity. This research report categorizes the Global Space Mining Market by companies, region, type and end-use industry.

Get Exclusive Sample Report at https://databridgemarketresearch.com/request-a-sample/?dbmr=global-space-mining-market

Market Drivers:

  • Current and growing forthcoming space missions are expected to drive the market growth
  • Increased investments and ambitions by the government authorities is expected to drive the market growth

Market Definition:

Space mining is the process of excavation of materials and minerals from asteroids and near-earth objects. The purpose of space mining is similar to that of earth mining, exploitation and excavation of precious materials and minerals. The major difference is the cost involved for both which is extremely costly for space mining, but due to the rapid decline in resources and these resources becoming increasingly scarce on earth, space mining could be the only viable option for the excavation of minerals and materials.

Major Market Competitors:

Few of the major players competing in the space mining market are:-

  • Deep Space Industries Inc.,
  • Planetary Resources,
  • Moon Express,
  • ispace,
  • Asteroid Mining Corporation Limited,
  • Shackleton Energy Company,
  • KLEOS SPACE S.A..,
  • ISRO,
  • Boeing,
  • SPACE EXPLORATION TECHNOLOGIES CORP.,
  • Northrop Grumman Corporation,
  • Sierra Nevada Corporation,
  • Virgin Galactic,
  • Made In Space Inc.,
  • Ad Astra Rocket Company,
  • Airbus S.A.S.,
  • TransAstra Corporation,
  • OffWorld,
  • US Inc.,
  • NASA,
  • European Space Agency,
  • Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency,
  • China National Space Administration, and

For More Inquiry Contact us at https://databridgemarketresearch.com/inquire-before-buying/?dbmr=global-space-mining-market

Global Space Mining Market,

  • By Phase (Spacecraft Design, Launch, Operation),
  • Type of Asteroid (Type C, Type S, Type M),
  • Type of Commodity Resource (Water, Platinum Group Materials, Structural Elements),
  • Distance from Earth (Near-Earth Asteroids, Asteroid Belt Distance Ranges from Earth),
  • Application (Extra-terrestrial Commodity, Construction, Human Life Sustainability, Fuel, 3D Printing),
  • Utilization (Earth, Space),
  • Geography (North America, South America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Middle East and Africa)– Industry Trends and Forecast to 2026

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part 01: Executive Summary

Part 02: Scope of the Report

Part 03: Research Methodology

Part 04: Market Landscape

  • Market Ecosystem
  • Market Characteristics
  • Market Segmentation Analysis

Part 05: Pipeline Analysis

  • Pipeline Analysis

Part 06: Market Sizing

  • Market Definition
  • Market Sizing
  • Market Size And Forecast

Part 07: Five Forces Analysis

  • Bargaining Power Of Buyers
  • Bargaining Power Of Suppliers
  • Threat Of New Entrants
  • Threat Of Substitutes
  • Threat Of Rivalry
  • Market Condition

Part 08: Market Segmentation

  • Segmentation
  • Comparison
  • Market Opportunity

Part 09: Customer Landscape

Part 10: Regional Landscape

  • Geographical Segmentation
  • Regional Comparison
  • North America
  • South America
  • Europe
  • Mea
  • Apac
  • Market Opportunity

Part 11: Decision Framework

Part 12: Drivers and Challenges

  • Market Drivers
  • Market Challenges

Part 13: Market Trends

Part 14: Vendor Landscape

  • Overview
  • Landscape Disruption

Part 15: Vendor Analysis

  • Vendors Covered
  • Vendor Classification
  • Market Positioning Of Vendors

Part 16: Appendix

  • List Of Abbreviations

See The Complete Table Of Contents And List Of Exhibits, As Well As Selected Illustrations And Example Pages From This Report.

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About Data Bridge Market Research:

Data Bridge Market Research set forth itself as an unconventional and neoteric Market research and consulting firm with unparalleled level of resilience and integrated approaches. We are determined to unearth the best market opportunities and foster efficient information for your business to thrive in the market. Data Bridge endeavors to provide appropriate solutions to the complex business challenges and initiates an effortless decision-making process.

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NASA’s New Millennium Program: Taking Risks to Reduce Future Danger

For just over a decade, NASA’s New Millennium Program (NMP) developed technology-focused missions to gather science about the Earth and the …

For just over a decade, NASA’s New Millennium Program (NMP) developed technology-focused missions to gather science about the Earth and the solar system. The program’s goal was to test emerging technologies and instruments in space at a relatively low cost in order to reduce the cost and potential damage of larger, more pivotal spacecraft. The NMP flew six missions before its budget was canceled in 2009.

The technology found on NASA’s space and planetary missions undergo severe testing while on the ground. But hardware failure led to the loss of a handful of missions, such as Mariner 3.

“It is much more difficult to design specialized equipment and components to withstand the harsh environment of space —zero pressure, extreme temperatures, and deadly high-energy particles — than to design ‘gadgets’ for everyday applications here on Earth,” according toNASA’s NMP website.

Enter the New Millennium Program. Launched in 1995, the program was a joint venture between NASA’s Office of Space Science and Office of Earth Science,and described by NASA as “an ambitious, exciting vision to speed up space exploration through the development and testing of leading-edge technologies.” By reducing the risks and costs of future NASA space science missions, the NMP hoped to reach its goal of having multiple spacecraft exploring the solar system on different missions happening at the same time.

According to a1997 overview, the technologies tested by the program would help develop methods for producing lower-mass spacecraft and increased spacecraft autonomy, which would require less input from controllers on the ground. Advanced propulsion techniques were also planned for development, to allow spacecraft to reach their destinations faster without the need to reduce its mass.

Although theprimary goals of the NMP program involved field-testing the technology, science was a core requirement for each mission launched into space. To minimize losses should the technology fail, costs were kept low in relation to other missions; in the last year of the program, the 2008 budget for New Millennium was only $25.8 million out of NASA’s $17.3 billion total budget.

The New Millennium Program flew six successful missions. The hardware tested by the program has since been incorporated on NASA’s Cassini mission and the European Space Agency’s LISA Pathfinder mission.

Technology

During its lifetime, NMP gathered input from both the space and Earth science communities. An Integrated Project Development Team consisting of scientists, mission planners and technologists then combined various proposals into working mission concepts, which they submitted to NASA Headquarters for approval.

The main goals of NMP were to reduce the size of the launch vehicle and the number of people required for the mission’s operation — the two most expensive parts of any space mission’s budget.

To reduce costs, NMP tested instruments that were smaller and lighter, as well as those that could serve multiple functions and thus, reduce the need for multiple instruments. The program also focused on ion propulsion, which increased the speed a spacecraft traveled to its destination, and autonomous navigation, which reduced the need for an operation team. NMP team members looked for ways to make power production and use more efficient and worked on improving communications between spacecraft and Earth.

Originally, New Millennium missions that tested technology for planetary missions were named “Deep Space,” while those that observed our own planet were called “Earth Observing.” An overhaul to the program in 2000 led to the Deep Space group being renamed “Space Technology.”

The New Millennium missions were as follows:

Deep Space 1 (DS1): Launched in October 1998,DS1 tested a total of 10 advanced spacecraft technologies for ion propulsion, communications, autonomous operations and navigation, multifunctional structures and microelectronics, as it flew by two comets.

Deep Space 2 (DS2): Launched in January 1999, DS2 carried technologies to help enable future Mars surface networks, including a single-stage, passive atmospheric entry system and a high-impact landing system designed to deliver the science payload up to 3.2 feet (1 meter) below the Red Planet’s surface. DS2 was also carrying a miniaturized telecom system, low-temperature batteries and a suite of miniaturized in-situ scientific instruments. The mission was lost on Dec. 3, 1999, along with the Mars Polar Lander that it had hitched a ride on.

Earth Observing 1 (EO-1): For nearly 17 years, EO-1 collected over 90,000 images of Earth. Along the way, EO-1 validated a multispectral instrument that was a significant improvement over the previous instrument carried by the Landsat 7 satellite..

Space Technology 5 (ST5): Three full-service microsatellites tested the ability of miniaturized satellite components. Each carried instruments capable of guidance, navigation and control, attitude control, propulsion and high bandwidth,complex communication functions. The microsatellites also carried their own mix of new technology, including a micropropulsion system suitable for small changes in direction, an improved communication device, a coating that limits how heat is transferred and microelectronics with increased radiation tolerance.

Space Technology 6 (ST6): Rather than a spacecraft, the ST6 mission was composed of two separate subsystem technologies, or software to help make spacecraft more efficient. The Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment was beamed aboard EO-1 in early 2004. One of the softwares enabled the spacecraft to “decide” what kind of observations would be scientifically valuable and what data or images were important enough to send to Earth, all without human input. The Inertial Stellar Compass, another software package beamed aboard TacSat-2, allowed the spacecraft to continuously determine the height or direction it points, and enabled the spacecraft to recover its orientation after a temporary power loss.

Space Technology 7 (ST7): The ST7 project flew a Disturbance Reduction System, which incorporated enhanced thruster technology with enhanced sensor technology to demonstrate precision spacecraft control. The system validated the position-measurement of objects in weightlessness with about 100 times greater accuracy than ever before.

The end of the road

The budget for the New Millennium Program was cut in 2009, ending the program. However, its legacy flies on in missions such as Deep Impact, Dawn, Mars Exploration Rovers, Mars Science Laboratory and Lisa Pathfinder.

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Elon Musk’s SpaceX to have launches reviewed by Pentagon

The Pentagon will review rocket launches by Elon Musk’s SpaceX, it has said. The certification that allows the company to send launch vehicles into …

The Pentagon will review rocket launches by Elon Musk’s SpaceX, it has said.

The certification that allows the company to send launch vehicles into space will be reviewed to check that the US Air Force complied with the requisite guidelines, investigators said in a memo.

“Our objective is to determine whether the U.S. Air Force complied with the Launch Services New Entrant Certification Guide when certifying the launch system design for the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle-class SpaceX Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy launch vehicles,” wrote US Department Of Defense Deputy Inspector General Michael Roark.

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SpaceX successfully launched its first national security space mission for the US in December. One of its rockets carried a military navigation satellite into space from Florida’s Cape Canaveral, marking a major moment for Mr Musk’s company.

The US government hopes that many space missions will eventually be taken over by private companies such as SpaceX and its competitors, with the hope that it could make launches cheaper.

ShapeCreated with Sketch.Nasa’s most stunning pictures of space

Show all 30
leftCreated with Sketch.rightCreated with Sketch.

1/30 Earth from the ISS

From the International Space Station, Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry W. Virts took this photograph of the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. Gulf Coast at sunset
Nasa

2/30 Frosty slopes of Mars

This image of an area on the surface of Mars, approximately 1.5 by 3 kilometers in size, shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. The image was taken by Nasa’s HiRISE camera, which is mounted on its Mars Reconaissance Orbiter
Nasa

3/30 Orion Capsule splashes down

The Orion capsule jetted off into space before heading back a few hours later — having proved that it can be used, one day, to carry humans to Mars
Nasa

4/30 The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launch

The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, carrying three new astronauts to the International Space Station. It also took caviar, ready for the satellite’s inhabitants to celebrate the holidays
Nasa

5/30 Yellowstone from space

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman shared this image of Yellowstone via his twitter account
Nasa

6/30 Black Hole Friday

Nasa celebrated Black Friday by looking into space instead — sharing pictures of black holes
Nasa

7/30 NuSTAR

X-rays stream off the sun in this image showing observations from by NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)
Nasa

8/30 Saturn

This near-infrared color image shows a specular reflection, or sunglint, off of a hydrocarbon lake named Kivu Lacus on Saturn’s moon Titan
Nasa

9/30 Worlds Apart

Although Mimas and Pandora, shown here, both orbit Saturn, they are very different moons. Pandora, “small” by moon standards (50 miles or 81 kilometers across) is elongated and irregular in shape. Mimas (246 miles or 396 kilometers across), a “medium-sized” moon, formed into a sphere due to self-gravity imposed by its higher mass
Nasa

10/30 Solar Flare

An X1.6 class solar flare flashes in the middle of the sun in this image taken 10 September, captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory
Nasa

11/30 Solar Flare

An image from Nasa’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows a 200,000 mile long solar filament ripping through the Sun’s corona in September 2013
Nasa

12/30 Cassiopeia A c

A false colour image of Cassiopeia A comprised with data from the Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes and the Chandra X-Ray observatory
Nasa

13/30 Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy

An image of the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy seen in infrared light by the Herschel Space Observatory. Regions of space such as this are where new stars are born from a mixture of elements and cosmic dust
Nasa

14/30 Mars Rover Spirit

Nasa’s Mars Rover Spirit took the first picture from Spirit since problems with communications began a week earlier. The image shows the robotic arm extended to the rock called Adirondack
Nasa

15/30 Morning Aurora From the Space Station

Nasa astronaut Scott Kelly captured this photograph of the green lights of the aurora from the International Space Station

16/30 Launch of History – Making STS-41G Mission in 1984

The Space Shuttle Challenger launches from Florida at dawn. On this mission, Kathryn Sullivan became the first U.S. woman to perform a spacewalk and Marc Garneau became the first Canadian in space. The crew of seven was the largest to fly on a spacecraft at that time, and STS-41G was the first flight to include two female astronauts

17/30 A Fresh Perspective on an Extraordinary Cluster of Galaxies

Galaxy clusters are often described by superlatives. After all, they are huge conglomerations of galaxies, hot gas, and dark matter and represent the largest structures in the Universe held together by gravity

18/30 Veil Nebula Supernova Remnant

Nasa’s Hubble Space Telescope has unveiled in stunning detail a small section of the Veil Nebula – expanding remains of a massive star that exploded about 8,000 years ago

19/30 Hubble Sees a Galactic Sunflower

The arrangement of the spiral arms in the galaxy Messier 63, seen here in an image from the Nasa Hubble Space Telescope, recall the pattern at the center of a sunflower

20/30 A Hubble Cosmic Couple

The spectacular cosmic pairing of the star Hen 2-427 — more commonly known as WR 124 — and the nebula M1-67 which surrounds it

21/30 Pluto image

Four images from New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) were combined with colour data from the Ralph instrument to create this enhanced colour global view of Pluto

22/30 Fresh Crater Near Sirenum Fossae Region of Mars

The HiRISE camera aboard Nasa’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter acquired this closeup image of a “fresh” (on a geological scale, though quite old on a human scale) impact crater in the Sirenum Fossae region of Mars. This impact crater appears relatively recent as it has a sharp rim and well-preserved ejecta

23/30 Earth Observations From Gemini IV in 1965

This photograph of the Florida Straits and Grand Bahama Bank was taken during the Gemini IV mission during orbit no. 19 in 1965. The Gemini IV crew conducted scientific experiments, including photography of Earth’s weather and terrain, for the remainder of their four-day mission following Ed White’s historic spacewalk on June 3

24/30 Nasa Celebrates 50 Years of Spacewalking

For 50 years, NASA has been “suiting up” for spacewalking. In this 1984 photograph of the first untethered spacewalk, NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless is in the midst of the first “field” tryout of a nitrogen-propelled backpack device called the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU)

25/30 Hubble Peers into the Most Crowded Place in the Milky Way

This Nasa Hubble Space Telescope image presents the Arches Cluster, the densest known star cluster in the Milky Way

26/30 An Astronaut’s View from Space

Nasa astronaut Reid Wiseman tweeted this photo from the International Space Station on 2 September 2014

27/30 Giant Landform on Mars

On Mars, we can observe four classes of sandy landforms formed by the wind, or aeolian bedforms: ripples, transverse aeolian ridges, dunes, and what are called “draa”

28/30 Expedition 39 Landing

A sokol suit helmet can be seen against the window of the Soyuz TMA-11M capsule shortly after the spacecraft landed with Expedition 39 Commander Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan

29/30 Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Viewed by Voyager I

30/30 Chandra Observatory Sees a Heart in the Darkness

1/30 Earth from the ISS

From the International Space Station, Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry W. Virts took this photograph of the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. Gulf Coast at sunset
Nasa

2/30 Frosty slopes of Mars

This image of an area on the surface of Mars, approximately 1.5 by 3 kilometers in size, shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. The image was taken by Nasa’s HiRISE camera, which is mounted on its Mars Reconaissance Orbiter
Nasa

3/30 Orion Capsule splashes down

The Orion capsule jetted off into space before heading back a few hours later — having proved that it can be used, one day, to carry humans to Mars
Nasa

4/30 The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launch

The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, carrying three new astronauts to the International Space Station. It also took caviar, ready for the satellite’s inhabitants to celebrate the holidays
Nasa

5/30 Yellowstone from space

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman shared this image of Yellowstone via his twitter account
Nasa

6/30 Black Hole Friday

Nasa celebrated Black Friday by looking into space instead — sharing pictures of black holes
Nasa

7/30 NuSTAR

X-rays stream off the sun in this image showing observations from by NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)
Nasa

8/30 Saturn

This near-infrared color image shows a specular reflection, or sunglint, off of a hydrocarbon lake named Kivu Lacus on Saturn’s moon Titan
Nasa

9/30 Worlds Apart

Although Mimas and Pandora, shown here, both orbit Saturn, they are very different moons. Pandora, “small” by moon standards (50 miles or 81 kilometers across) is elongated and irregular in shape. Mimas (246 miles or 396 kilometers across), a “medium-sized” moon, formed into a sphere due to self-gravity imposed by its higher mass
Nasa

10/30 Solar Flare

An X1.6 class solar flare flashes in the middle of the sun in this image taken 10 September, captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory
Nasa

11/30 Solar Flare

An image from Nasa’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows a 200,000 mile long solar filament ripping through the Sun’s corona in September 2013
Nasa

12/30 Cassiopeia A c

A false colour image of Cassiopeia A comprised with data from the Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes and the Chandra X-Ray observatory
Nasa

13/30 Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy

An image of the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy seen in infrared light by the Herschel Space Observatory. Regions of space such as this are where new stars are born from a mixture of elements and cosmic dust
Nasa

14/30 Mars Rover Spirit

Nasa’s Mars Rover Spirit took the first picture from Spirit since problems with communications began a week earlier. The image shows the robotic arm extended to the rock called Adirondack
Nasa

15/30 Morning Aurora From the Space Station

Nasa astronaut Scott Kelly captured this photograph of the green lights of the aurora from the International Space Station

16/30 Launch of History – Making STS-41G Mission in 1984

The Space Shuttle Challenger launches from Florida at dawn. On this mission, Kathryn Sullivan became the first U.S. woman to perform a spacewalk and Marc Garneau became the first Canadian in space. The crew of seven was the largest to fly on a spacecraft at that time, and STS-41G was the first flight to include two female astronauts

17/30 A Fresh Perspective on an Extraordinary Cluster of Galaxies

Galaxy clusters are often described by superlatives. After all, they are huge conglomerations of galaxies, hot gas, and dark matter and represent the largest structures in the Universe held together by gravity

18/30 Veil Nebula Supernova Remnant

Nasa’s Hubble Space Telescope has unveiled in stunning detail a small section of the Veil Nebula – expanding remains of a massive star that exploded about 8,000 years ago

19/30 Hubble Sees a Galactic Sunflower

The arrangement of the spiral arms in the galaxy Messier 63, seen here in an image from the Nasa Hubble Space Telescope, recall the pattern at the center of a sunflower

20/30 A Hubble Cosmic Couple

The spectacular cosmic pairing of the star Hen 2-427 — more commonly known as WR 124 — and the nebula M1-67 which surrounds it

21/30 Pluto image

Four images from New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) were combined with colour data from the Ralph instrument to create this enhanced colour global view of Pluto

22/30 Fresh Crater Near Sirenum Fossae Region of Mars

The HiRISE camera aboard Nasa’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter acquired this closeup image of a “fresh” (on a geological scale, though quite old on a human scale) impact crater in the Sirenum Fossae region of Mars. This impact crater appears relatively recent as it has a sharp rim and well-preserved ejecta

23/30 Earth Observations From Gemini IV in 1965

This photograph of the Florida Straits and Grand Bahama Bank was taken during the Gemini IV mission during orbit no. 19 in 1965. The Gemini IV crew conducted scientific experiments, including photography of Earth’s weather and terrain, for the remainder of their four-day mission following Ed White’s historic spacewalk on June 3

24/30 Nasa Celebrates 50 Years of Spacewalking

For 50 years, NASA has been “suiting up” for spacewalking. In this 1984 photograph of the first untethered spacewalk, NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless is in the midst of the first “field” tryout of a nitrogen-propelled backpack device called the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU)

25/30 Hubble Peers into the Most Crowded Place in the Milky Way

This Nasa Hubble Space Telescope image presents the Arches Cluster, the densest known star cluster in the Milky Way

26/30 An Astronaut’s View from Space

Nasa astronaut Reid Wiseman tweeted this photo from the International Space Station on 2 September 2014

27/30 Giant Landform on Mars

On Mars, we can observe four classes of sandy landforms formed by the wind, or aeolian bedforms: ripples, transverse aeolian ridges, dunes, and what are called “draa”

28/30 Expedition 39 Landing

A sokol suit helmet can be seen against the window of the Soyuz TMA-11M capsule shortly after the spacecraft landed with Expedition 39 Commander Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan

29/30 Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Viewed by Voyager I

30/30 Chandra Observatory Sees a Heart in the Darkness

The review comes at a difficult time for SpaceX, which said last month that it would sack about 10 per cent of its more than 6,000 employees. It said then that it was facing “extraordinarily difficult challenges”.

The memo to SpaceX – which requested to speak to someone familiar with the certification, and said investigations would begin in February – did not say why specifically the new review had been launched, or whether there was any likelihood that the certification itself would be changed.

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Elon Musk reveals price of a ticket to Mars on board SpaceX flights

Moving to Mars could one day cost less than $100,000, according to Elon Musk – and coming back will be free if you don’t like it. The billionaire …

Moving to Mars could one day cost less than $100,000, according to Elon Musk – and coming back will be free if you don’t like it.

The billionaire founder of companies including private space firm SpaceX hopes to one day take private citizens to the red planet, with the hope they might live there.

And a journey will be eventually be relatively cheap, he says, though it depends in part on how many people actually want to go.

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Asked on Twitter about how much the journey will eventually cost, he said that it would be cheap enough that many homeowners could easily relocate to live on Mars instead.

“Very dependent on volume, but I’m confident moving to Mars (return ticket is free) will one day cost less than $500k & maybe even below $100k,” he wrote. “Low enough that most people in advanced economies could sell their home on Earth & move to Mars if they want.”

ShapeCreated with Sketch.Nasa’s most stunning pictures of space

Show all 30
leftCreated with Sketch.rightCreated with Sketch.

1/30 Earth from the ISS

From the International Space Station, Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry W. Virts took this photograph of the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. Gulf Coast at sunset
Nasa

2/30 Frosty slopes of Mars

This image of an area on the surface of Mars, approximately 1.5 by 3 kilometers in size, shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. The image was taken by Nasa’s HiRISE camera, which is mounted on its Mars Reconaissance Orbiter
Nasa

3/30 Orion Capsule splashes down

The Orion capsule jetted off into space before heading back a few hours later — having proved that it can be used, one day, to carry humans to Mars
Nasa

4/30 The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launch

The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, carrying three new astronauts to the International Space Station. It also took caviar, ready for the satellite’s inhabitants to celebrate the holidays
Nasa

5/30 Yellowstone from space

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman shared this image of Yellowstone via his twitter account
Nasa

6/30 Black Hole Friday

Nasa celebrated Black Friday by looking into space instead — sharing pictures of black holes
Nasa

7/30 NuSTAR

X-rays stream off the sun in this image showing observations from by NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)
Nasa

8/30 Saturn

This near-infrared color image shows a specular reflection, or sunglint, off of a hydrocarbon lake named Kivu Lacus on Saturn’s moon Titan
Nasa

9/30 Worlds Apart

Although Mimas and Pandora, shown here, both orbit Saturn, they are very different moons. Pandora, “small” by moon standards (50 miles or 81 kilometers across) is elongated and irregular in shape. Mimas (246 miles or 396 kilometers across), a “medium-sized” moon, formed into a sphere due to self-gravity imposed by its higher mass
Nasa

10/30 Solar Flare

An X1.6 class solar flare flashes in the middle of the sun in this image taken 10 September, captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory
Nasa

11/30 Solar Flare

An image from Nasa’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows a 200,000 mile long solar filament ripping through the Sun’s corona in September 2013
Nasa

12/30 Cassiopeia A c

A false colour image of Cassiopeia A comprised with data from the Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes and the Chandra X-Ray observatory
Nasa

13/30 Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy

An image of the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy seen in infrared light by the Herschel Space Observatory. Regions of space such as this are where new stars are born from a mixture of elements and cosmic dust
Nasa

14/30 Mars Rover Spirit

Nasa’s Mars Rover Spirit took the first picture from Spirit since problems with communications began a week earlier. The image shows the robotic arm extended to the rock called Adirondack
Nasa

15/30 Morning Aurora From the Space Station

Nasa astronaut Scott Kelly captured this photograph of the green lights of the aurora from the International Space Station

16/30 Launch of History – Making STS-41G Mission in 1984

The Space Shuttle Challenger launches from Florida at dawn. On this mission, Kathryn Sullivan became the first U.S. woman to perform a spacewalk and Marc Garneau became the first Canadian in space. The crew of seven was the largest to fly on a spacecraft at that time, and STS-41G was the first flight to include two female astronauts

17/30 A Fresh Perspective on an Extraordinary Cluster of Galaxies

Galaxy clusters are often described by superlatives. After all, they are huge conglomerations of galaxies, hot gas, and dark matter and represent the largest structures in the Universe held together by gravity

18/30 Veil Nebula Supernova Remnant

Nasa’s Hubble Space Telescope has unveiled in stunning detail a small section of the Veil Nebula – expanding remains of a massive star that exploded about 8,000 years ago

19/30 Hubble Sees a Galactic Sunflower

The arrangement of the spiral arms in the galaxy Messier 63, seen here in an image from the Nasa Hubble Space Telescope, recall the pattern at the center of a sunflower

20/30 A Hubble Cosmic Couple

The spectacular cosmic pairing of the star Hen 2-427 — more commonly known as WR 124 — and the nebula M1-67 which surrounds it

21/30 Pluto image

Four images from New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) were combined with colour data from the Ralph instrument to create this enhanced colour global view of Pluto

22/30 Fresh Crater Near Sirenum Fossae Region of Mars

The HiRISE camera aboard Nasa’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter acquired this closeup image of a “fresh” (on a geological scale, though quite old on a human scale) impact crater in the Sirenum Fossae region of Mars. This impact crater appears relatively recent as it has a sharp rim and well-preserved ejecta

23/30 Earth Observations From Gemini IV in 1965

This photograph of the Florida Straits and Grand Bahama Bank was taken during the Gemini IV mission during orbit no. 19 in 1965. The Gemini IV crew conducted scientific experiments, including photography of Earth’s weather and terrain, for the remainder of their four-day mission following Ed White’s historic spacewalk on June 3

24/30 Nasa Celebrates 50 Years of Spacewalking

For 50 years, NASA has been “suiting up” for spacewalking. In this 1984 photograph of the first untethered spacewalk, NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless is in the midst of the first “field” tryout of a nitrogen-propelled backpack device called the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU)

25/30 Hubble Peers into the Most Crowded Place in the Milky Way

This Nasa Hubble Space Telescope image presents the Arches Cluster, the densest known star cluster in the Milky Way

26/30 An Astronaut’s View from Space

Nasa astronaut Reid Wiseman tweeted this photo from the International Space Station on 2 September 2014

27/30 Giant Landform on Mars

On Mars, we can observe four classes of sandy landforms formed by the wind, or aeolian bedforms: ripples, transverse aeolian ridges, dunes, and what are called “draa”

28/30 Expedition 39 Landing

A sokol suit helmet can be seen against the window of the Soyuz TMA-11M capsule shortly after the spacecraft landed with Expedition 39 Commander Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan

29/30 Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Viewed by Voyager I

30/30 Chandra Observatory Sees a Heart in the Darkness

1/30 Earth from the ISS

From the International Space Station, Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry W. Virts took this photograph of the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. Gulf Coast at sunset
Nasa

2/30 Frosty slopes of Mars

This image of an area on the surface of Mars, approximately 1.5 by 3 kilometers in size, shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. The image was taken by Nasa’s HiRISE camera, which is mounted on its Mars Reconaissance Orbiter
Nasa

3/30 Orion Capsule splashes down

The Orion capsule jetted off into space before heading back a few hours later — having proved that it can be used, one day, to carry humans to Mars
Nasa

4/30 The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launch

The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, carrying three new astronauts to the International Space Station. It also took caviar, ready for the satellite’s inhabitants to celebrate the holidays
Nasa

5/30 Yellowstone from space

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman shared this image of Yellowstone via his twitter account
Nasa

6/30 Black Hole Friday

Nasa celebrated Black Friday by looking into space instead — sharing pictures of black holes
Nasa

7/30 NuSTAR

X-rays stream off the sun in this image showing observations from by NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)
Nasa

8/30 Saturn

This near-infrared color image shows a specular reflection, or sunglint, off of a hydrocarbon lake named Kivu Lacus on Saturn’s moon Titan
Nasa

9/30 Worlds Apart

Although Mimas and Pandora, shown here, both orbit Saturn, they are very different moons. Pandora, “small” by moon standards (50 miles or 81 kilometers across) is elongated and irregular in shape. Mimas (246 miles or 396 kilometers across), a “medium-sized” moon, formed into a sphere due to self-gravity imposed by its higher mass
Nasa

10/30 Solar Flare

An X1.6 class solar flare flashes in the middle of the sun in this image taken 10 September, captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory
Nasa

11/30 Solar Flare

An image from Nasa’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows a 200,000 mile long solar filament ripping through the Sun’s corona in September 2013
Nasa

12/30 Cassiopeia A c

A false colour image of Cassiopeia A comprised with data from the Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes and the Chandra X-Ray observatory
Nasa

13/30 Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy

An image of the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy seen in infrared light by the Herschel Space Observatory. Regions of space such as this are where new stars are born from a mixture of elements and cosmic dust
Nasa

14/30 Mars Rover Spirit

Nasa’s Mars Rover Spirit took the first picture from Spirit since problems with communications began a week earlier. The image shows the robotic arm extended to the rock called Adirondack
Nasa

15/30 Morning Aurora From the Space Station

Nasa astronaut Scott Kelly captured this photograph of the green lights of the aurora from the International Space Station

16/30 Launch of History – Making STS-41G Mission in 1984

The Space Shuttle Challenger launches from Florida at dawn. On this mission, Kathryn Sullivan became the first U.S. woman to perform a spacewalk and Marc Garneau became the first Canadian in space. The crew of seven was the largest to fly on a spacecraft at that time, and STS-41G was the first flight to include two female astronauts

17/30 A Fresh Perspective on an Extraordinary Cluster of Galaxies

Galaxy clusters are often described by superlatives. After all, they are huge conglomerations of galaxies, hot gas, and dark matter and represent the largest structures in the Universe held together by gravity

18/30 Veil Nebula Supernova Remnant

Nasa’s Hubble Space Telescope has unveiled in stunning detail a small section of the Veil Nebula – expanding remains of a massive star that exploded about 8,000 years ago

19/30 Hubble Sees a Galactic Sunflower

The arrangement of the spiral arms in the galaxy Messier 63, seen here in an image from the Nasa Hubble Space Telescope, recall the pattern at the center of a sunflower

20/30 A Hubble Cosmic Couple

The spectacular cosmic pairing of the star Hen 2-427 — more commonly known as WR 124 — and the nebula M1-67 which surrounds it

21/30 Pluto image

Four images from New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) were combined with colour data from the Ralph instrument to create this enhanced colour global view of Pluto

22/30 Fresh Crater Near Sirenum Fossae Region of Mars

The HiRISE camera aboard Nasa’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter acquired this closeup image of a “fresh” (on a geological scale, though quite old on a human scale) impact crater in the Sirenum Fossae region of Mars. This impact crater appears relatively recent as it has a sharp rim and well-preserved ejecta

23/30 Earth Observations From Gemini IV in 1965

This photograph of the Florida Straits and Grand Bahama Bank was taken during the Gemini IV mission during orbit no. 19 in 1965. The Gemini IV crew conducted scientific experiments, including photography of Earth’s weather and terrain, for the remainder of their four-day mission following Ed White’s historic spacewalk on June 3

24/30 Nasa Celebrates 50 Years of Spacewalking

For 50 years, NASA has been “suiting up” for spacewalking. In this 1984 photograph of the first untethered spacewalk, NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless is in the midst of the first “field” tryout of a nitrogen-propelled backpack device called the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU)

25/30 Hubble Peers into the Most Crowded Place in the Milky Way

This Nasa Hubble Space Telescope image presents the Arches Cluster, the densest known star cluster in the Milky Way

26/30 An Astronaut’s View from Space

Nasa astronaut Reid Wiseman tweeted this photo from the International Space Station on 2 September 2014

27/30 Giant Landform on Mars

On Mars, we can observe four classes of sandy landforms formed by the wind, or aeolian bedforms: ripples, transverse aeolian ridges, dunes, and what are called “draa”

28/30 Expedition 39 Landing

A sokol suit helmet can be seen against the window of the Soyuz TMA-11M capsule shortly after the spacecraft landed with Expedition 39 Commander Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan

29/30 Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Viewed by Voyager I

30/30 Chandra Observatory Sees a Heart in the Darkness

Mr Musk hopes that space travellers will eventually make their journey on SpaceX’s starship, a new craft that is going through the testing process.

A number of Twitter users asked the SpaceX boss what the public could do to support its development, apparently in the hope of being allowed to make trips to Mars as soon as possible.

“The goodwill of the public is critical to Starship’s success,” he wrote in one post.

He was then asked how he would ensure the public stayed engaged with the project. He joked that there would probably be some RUDs – rapid unscheduled disassemblies, which is how SpaceX refers to the events other people might call an exposion – but that there would be plenty to get excited about.

“Just planning on keeping the public informed about progress & setbacks,” he wrote about his plans. “Will be some RUDs along the way, but excitement is guaranteed!”

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