TESS Astronomers Create Catalog of Habitable Zone Stars

The spacecraft was launched on April 18, 2018, with a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station …

NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is the first space-based, all-sky surveyor to search for alien worlds. The spacecraft was launched on April 18, 2018, with a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. TESS will observe 400,000 stars across the whole sky to catch a glimpse of an exoplanet transiting across the face of its parent star. A team of astronomers from Cornell, Lehigh and Vanderbilt Universities has identified the most promising targets for this search. The new catalog identifies 1,822 stars for which TESS is sensitive enough to spot Earth-like exoplanets just a bit larger than our planet that receive radiation from their star equivalent to what Earth receives from our Sun.

An artists’ concept of NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite against a background of stars and orbiting planets in the Milky Way. Image credit: ESA / M. Kornmesser, ESO / Aaron E. Lepsch, ADNET Systems Inc / Britt Griswold, Maslow Media Group / NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center / Cornell University.

An artists’ concept of NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite against a background of stars and orbiting planets in the Milky Way. Image credit: ESA / M. Kornmesser, ESO / Aaron E. Lepsch, ADNET Systems Inc / Britt Griswold, Maslow Media Group / NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center / Cornell University.

The 1,822 stars selected for the catalog are bright, cool dwarfs, with temperatures roughly between 2,700 and 5,000 Kelvin (2,427-4,727 degrees Celsius, or 4,400-8,541 degrees Fahrenheit).

They are selected due to their brightness; the closest are only approximately 6 light-years from Earth.

“Life could exist on all sorts of worlds, but the kind we know can support life is our own, so it makes sense to first look for Earth-like planets,” said TESS science team member Professor Lisa Kaltenegger, director of Cornell’s Carl Sagan Institute.

“This catalog is important for TESS because anyone working with the data wants to know around which stars we can find the closest Earth-analogs.”

“I have 408 new favorite stars. It is amazing that I don’t have to pick just one; I now get to search hundreds of stars,” she added.

Confirming an exoplanet has been observed and figuring out the distance between it and its star requires detecting two transits across the star.

The 1,822 stars in the new catalog are ones from which TESS could detect two planetary transits during its mission. Those orbital periods place them squarely in the habitable zone of their star.

The catalog also identifies a subset of 227 stars for which TESS can not only probe for planets that receive the same irradiation as Earth, but for which TESS can also probe out farther, covering the full extent of the habitable zone all the way to cooler Mars-like orbits.

This will allow astronomers to probe the diversity of potentially habitable worlds around hundreds of cool stars during the TESS mission’s lifetime.

“We don’t know how many planets TESS will find around the hundreds of stars in our catalog or whether they will be habitable, but the odds are in our favor,” Professor Kaltenegger said.

“Some studies indicate that there are many rocky planets in the habitable zone of cool stars, like the ones in our catalog. We’re excited to see what worlds we’ll find.”

“This is a remarkable time in human history and a huge leap for our understanding of our place in the Universe,” said TESS science team member Dr. Keivan Stassun, an astronomer at Vanderbilt University.

The new catalog was published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters.

_____

L. Kaltenegger et al. 2019. TESS Habitable Zone Star Catalog. ApJL 874, L8; doi: 10.3847/2041-8213/ab0e8d

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NASA 2020 Budget Proposal Boosts Exploration, Downplays Science

SpaceX just completed the first test flight of its Crewed Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station, and the company expects to start flying …

NASA’s Lunar Gateway and a return to the Moon are the big winners in the 2020 budget proposed for the agency; the futures of planetary and Earth science are less clear.

Lunar Gateway

An artist’s conception of the Lunar Gateway station.

NASA

Rocket science is easy. It’s finding the funding for it that’s hard.

The Presidential Budget Request for NASA for the fiscal year 2020 is $21.019 billion — higher than the FY2018 budget, and much higher than the lean years earlier this decade. At the same time, it also represents a 2.2% drop, nearly half a billion dollars, from the just-approved 2019 budget.

Responding to the proposed budget, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine highlighted NASA’s initiative to return to the Moon in the next decade, and then on to Mars in the 2030s. “We will go to the Moon in the next decade in a way we have never gone before,” Bridenstine said in a press release. “This time, when we go to the Moon, we will stay.”

But the 2020 budget would decrease funding for other aspects of the agency, including science and outreach.

What’s Inside FY2020

Like other government agencies, NASA has undergone cuts under the Trump administration relative to the general congressional baseline. But there are some big winners, the biggest of which is the proposed Lunar Gateway; it would receive nearly double its funding to put a crewed space station in orbit around the Moon by the late 2020s.

The details of how the agency will carry out construction and operation of the Lunar Gateway isn’t immediately clear, though. It may rely on NASA’s new Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, which is due to carry out its inaugural flight in 2020, but Bridenstine also just floated the idea of using commercial vehicles. SpaceX just completed the first test flight of its Crewed Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station, and the company expects to start flying crew to the station this year. Either way, the SLS or commercial rockets would eventually be carrying crew to the Lunar Gateway in the Orion capsule.

NASA FY2020

A breakdown of proposed NASA funding from 2018 through 2024.

NASA

The budget proposal also mentions initiating a Mars Sample Return mission, which would follow up on the Mars 2020 rover. The budget also puts the launch of Europa Clipper in 2023, using a commercial carrier such as the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket.

However, even as funding increases for exploration, science is taking a hit, including drops in funding for astrophysics (-20%), planetary science (-4.9%), and Earth science (-7.8%). The beleaguered Wide-Field Infrared Space Telescope (WFIRST), built around a surplus 2.4-meter mirror donated by the National Reconnaissance Office, would also get zeroed out under the 2020 budget. Likewise, the budget proposes zero funding for NASA’s Office of STEM Engagement. Only the James Webb Space Telescope — now launching no earlier than March 2021 — is a winner, with a $46.6 million increase in funding in 2020 under the proposed budget.

Proposed vs. Approved

Of course, the latest proposal is just that: a proposal. Enacted budgets nearly always look different from what’s proposed early on. For a very recent example, the FY2019 budget request called for $19.9 billion for NASA — a move that likewise would have cancelled WFIRST, STEM outreach, and several Earth science missions. But the budget Congress pushed through upped the amount to $21.5 billion, undoing many of the called-for cuts. The question is, will Congress step in again?

The higher budget NASA is currently enjoying is nevertheless a far cry from its peak in the late 1960s, when it received more than 4% of the overall U.S. budget. There’s also the “no Buck Rogers, no bucks” tension between the more expensive crewed space program and the cheaper robotic missions. Many fear the Lunar Gateway project, like the International Space Station, SLS, and James Webb, will become a budgetary black hole.

As always, it’s a tug of war between what we’d like to do, versus what we can afford. To quote rocket pioneer Wernher von Braun: “Our two greatest problems are gravity and paperwork. We can lick gravity, but sometimes the paperwork is overwhelming.” NASA missions will have to continue to navigate the congressional labyrinth from proposal to launch.

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Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Market Global Size, Share, Trends, Business Growth …

Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Industry 2019 Global Market research report is a professional and in-depth study on the market size, growth, share, …

Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Industry 2019 Global Market research report is a professional and in-depth study on the market size, growth, share, trends, as well as industry analysis.

This press release was orginally distributed by SBWire

Pune, India — (SBWIRE) — 03/14/2019 — The Nanosatellite and Microsatellite market was valued at 520 Million US$ in 2018 and is projected to reach 1660 Million US$ by 2025, at a CAGR of 17.9% during the forecast period. In this study, 2018 has been considered as the base year and 2019 to 2025 as the forecast period to estimate the market size for Nanosatellite and Microsatellite.

Get Sample Copy of this Report @ https://www.researchreportsworld.com/enquiry/request-sample/13952185

The Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite market 2019 research provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite market analysis is provided for the international markets including development trends, competitive landscape analysis, and key regions development status. Development policies and plans are discussed as well as manufacturing processes and cost structures are also analyzed. This report also states import/export consumption, supply and demand Figures, cost, price, revenue and gross margins.

Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Industry 2019 Market Research Report is spread across 116 pages and provides exclusive vital statistics, data, information, trends and competitive landscape details in this niche sector.

Inquire more or share questions if any before the purchase on this report @ https://www.researchreportsworld.com/enquiry/pre-order-enquiry/13952185

Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite market competition by top manufacturers, with production, price, and revenue (value) and market share for each manufacturer; the top players including

– Lockheed Martin

– Northrop Gruman

– Raytheon

– Dynetics

– Surrey Satellite Technology

– Axelspace

– Sierra Nevada

– Clyde Space

– Planet Labs

– Dauria Aerospace

– ……

The report also focuses on global major leading industry players of Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite market providing information such as company profiles, product picture and specification, capacity, production, price, cost, revenue and contact information. Upstream raw materials and equipment and downstream demand analysis is also carried out. The Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite market development trends and marketing channels are analyzed. Finally, the feasibility of new investment projects is assessed and overall research conclusions offered.

With tables and figures helping analyze worldwide Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite market, this research provides key statistics on the state of the industry and is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals interested in the market.

Order a copy of Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Market Report 2019 @ https://www.researchreportsworld.com/purchase/13952185

Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Breakdown Data by Type

– Nanosatellite

– Microsatellite

Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Breakdown Data by Application

– National Security

– Science & Environment

– Commerce

– Others

Major Points from Table of Contents:

1 Study Coverage

1.1 Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Product

1.2 Key Market Segments in This Study

1.3 Key Manufacturers Covered

1.4 Market by Type

1.4.1 Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Market Size Growth Rate by Type

1.4.2 Nanosatellite

1.4.3 Microsatellite

1.5 Market by Application

1.5.1 Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Market Size Growth Rate by Application

1.5.2 National Security

1.5.3 Science & Environment

1.5.4 Commerce

1.5.5 Others

1.6 Study Objectives

1.7 Years Considered

2 Executive Summary

2.1 Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Market Size

2.1.1 Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Revenue 2014-2025

2.1.2 Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Production 2014-2025

2.2 Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Growth Rate (CAGR) 2019-2025

2.3 Analysis of Competitive Landscape

2.3.1 Manufacturers Market Concentration Ratio (CR5 and HHI)

2.3.2 Key Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Manufacturers

2.3.2.1 Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Manufacturing Base Distribution, Headquarters

2.3.2.2 Manufacturers Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Product Offered

2.3.2.3 Date of Manufacturers Enter into Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Market

2.4 Key Trends for Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Markets & Products

3 Market Size by Manufacturers

3.1 Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Production by Manufacturers

3.1.1 Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Production by Manufacturers

3.1.2 Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Production Market Share by Manufacturers

3.2 Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Revenue by Manufacturers

3.2.1 Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Revenue by Manufacturers (2014-2019)

3.2.2 Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Revenue Share by Manufacturers (2014-2019)

3.3 Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Price by Manufacturers

3.4 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion Plans

4 Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Production by Regions

4.1 Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Production by Regions

4.1.1 Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Production Market Share by Regions

4.1.2 Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Revenue Market Share by Regions

4.2 United States

4.2.1 United States Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Production

4.2.2 United States Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Revenue

4.2.3 Key Players in United States

4.2.4 United States Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Import & Export

4.3 Europe

4.3.1 Europe Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Production

4.3.2 Europe Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Revenue

4.3.3 Key Players in Europe

4.3.4 Europe Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Import & Export

4.4 China

4.4.1 China Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Production

4.4.2 China Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Revenue

4.4.3 Key Players in China

4.4.4 China Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Import & Export

4.5 Japan

4.5.1 Japan Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Production

4.5.2 Japan Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Revenue

4.5.3 Key Players in Japan

4.5.4 Japan Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Import & Export

4.6 Other Regions

4.6.1 South Korea

4.6.2 India

4.6.3 Southeast Asia

5 Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Consumption by Regions

5.1 Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Consumption by Regions

…….

6 Market Size by Type

6.1 Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Production by Type

6.2 Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Revenue by Type

6.3 Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Price by Type

7 Market Size by Application

7.1 Overview

7.2 Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Breakdown Dada by Application

7.2.1 Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Consumption by Application

7.2.2 Global Nanosatellite and Microsatellite Consumption Market Share by Application (2014-2019)

To Continued……

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Global Nanosatellite Market Outlook, Introduction, Research Objectives, share, Segment by …

… Northrop Grumman Corporation, OHB SE, Orbital ATK, Planet Labs, Ball Corporation, Clyde Space Ltd, Deep Space Industries, Innovative Solutions …

The market report, “Nanosatellite Market” Forecast 2019-2025 is detailed analysis dependent on Nanosatellite market that conveys the define thoroughly around the world. Which is Sorted out by the product/service quality technique, as an example, SWOT examination, the Nanosatellite market report clarifies a full analysis of Nanosatellite market globally. The report likewise incorporates imperative and top players Israel Aerospace Industries Ltd, Lockheed Martin, NanoAvionika, Northrop Grumman Corporation, OHB SE, Orbital ATK, Planet Labs, Ball Corporation, Clyde Space Ltd, Deep Space Industries, Innovative Solutions in Space BV, Interorbital Systems, QinetiQ Group PLC, Terra Bella, The Boeing Company

Click Here To Access The Report:https://market.biz/report/global-nanosatellite-market-qy/338765/#requestforsample

The estimation for Nanosatellite market through CAGR (Compound Annual Growth Rate) is done in this report. This report similarly assists the customer with grasping and settle on the right choice which would be improved by the accurate figures and graphs. Thinking about various orders, for instance, things, their applications, noteworthy makers, esteem organize business, It shows different fragments Portable, Stationary and sub-sections Food and Beverage, Oil and Gas, Manufacturing, Medical, Power Generation, Others of the worldwide Nanosatellite market. The report covers the most inclining substances of the general Nanosatellite market, that includes the best profit, evaluation, a procedure for the general business, gauges, things, supply, and request. This can grasp the condition of the market in detail.

The comprehensive Nanosatellite market contemplating report incorporates the elements that sway the Nanosatellite showcase development. The report also covers the obliging parts that limit the Nanosatellite showcase headway. The market situating and its size are in addition seen as reliant on topographical locales. The report likewise gives a profound examination of how the market is engineered regarding the sorts of the thing, and clients, applications, highlights and unrefined material utilized etc. The general Nanosatellite market report likewise talks about the significant market players, their advancing upgrades and degrees of advancement, their business structures, which have helped them to accomplish the recognizable players’ circumstance in the Nanosatellite showcase consistency. This report also contains the figures, outlines of data that guides the users to comprehend the determination of the Nanosatellite market.

Nanosatellite Market Type:

Communications Satellite

Positioning Satellite

Others

Nanosatellite Market Application:

IT & Telecommunication

Agriculture

Mining

Oil & Gas

Government

Get full Index of Nanosatellite Research Study at: https://market.biz/report/global-nanosatellite-market-qy/338765/#toc

The Report Covers In-Depth Analysis As Follows:

1. Industry Overview of Nanosatellite

2. Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of Nanosatellite

3. Technical Data and Manufacturing Plants Analysis of Nanosatellite

4. Global Nanosatellite Overall Market Overview.

5. Nanosatellite Regional Market Analysis

6. Global 2013-2018E Nanosatellite Segment Market Analysis (by Type)

7. Global 2013-2018E Nanosatellite Segment Market Analysis (by Application)

8. Major Manufacturers Analysis of Nanosatellite

9. Development Trend of Analysis of Nanosatellite Market.

10. Nanosatellite Marketing Type Analysis

11. Consumers Analysis of Nanosatellite

12. The conclusion of the Global Nanosatellite Market Professional Survey Report 2017

The global Nanosatellite market report delivers a certain assessment of all the key parts that acts variably and may drive you forward of contenders within the market. The report conjointly planned to supply the forecast concerning CAGR of the Nanosatellite market in share for a selected time. The report conjointly provides detailed info concerning the past business-related moves, present market patterns, and future modifications for business expansion. The regional classification is additionally provided any within the report.

Inquire More About This Nanosatellite Report:https://market.biz/report/global-nanosatellite-market-qy/338765/#inquiry

The report provides a large bunch of essential information together with case studies through that the client will clearly perceive the detailed analysis of Nanosatellite market in a well-organized manner together with the market-competitive study, develop financial decision-making skills, understand the long-term growth of the business, and trendy methodologies opted by the industries. For providing analytical data within the report to the customers with more clarity and ease, the experts have also provided graphs, charts, and figures associated with the knowledge.

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Elon Musk reveals price of a ticket to Mars on board SpaceX flights

Moving to Mars could one day cost less than $100,000, according to Elon Musk – and coming back will be free if you don’t like it. The billionaire …

Moving to Mars could one day cost less than $100,000, according to Elon Musk – and coming back will be free if you don’t like it.

The billionaire founder of companies including private space firm SpaceX hopes to one day take private citizens to the red planet, with the hope they might live there.

And a journey will be eventually be relatively cheap, he says, though it depends in part on how many people actually want to go.

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Asked on Twitter about how much the journey will eventually cost, he said that it would be cheap enough that many homeowners could easily relocate to live on Mars instead.

“Very dependent on volume, but I’m confident moving to Mars (return ticket is free) will one day cost less than $500k & maybe even below $100k,” he wrote. “Low enough that most people in advanced economies could sell their home on Earth & move to Mars if they want.”

ShapeCreated with Sketch.Nasa’s most stunning pictures of space

Show all 30
leftCreated with Sketch.rightCreated with Sketch.

1/30 Earth from the ISS

From the International Space Station, Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry W. Virts took this photograph of the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. Gulf Coast at sunset
Nasa

2/30 Frosty slopes of Mars

This image of an area on the surface of Mars, approximately 1.5 by 3 kilometers in size, shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. The image was taken by Nasa’s HiRISE camera, which is mounted on its Mars Reconaissance Orbiter
Nasa

3/30 Orion Capsule splashes down

The Orion capsule jetted off into space before heading back a few hours later — having proved that it can be used, one day, to carry humans to Mars
Nasa

4/30 The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launch

The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, carrying three new astronauts to the International Space Station. It also took caviar, ready for the satellite’s inhabitants to celebrate the holidays
Nasa

5/30 Yellowstone from space

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman shared this image of Yellowstone via his twitter account
Nasa

6/30 Black Hole Friday

Nasa celebrated Black Friday by looking into space instead — sharing pictures of black holes
Nasa

7/30 NuSTAR

X-rays stream off the sun in this image showing observations from by NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)
Nasa

8/30 Saturn

This near-infrared color image shows a specular reflection, or sunglint, off of a hydrocarbon lake named Kivu Lacus on Saturn’s moon Titan
Nasa

9/30 Worlds Apart

Although Mimas and Pandora, shown here, both orbit Saturn, they are very different moons. Pandora, “small” by moon standards (50 miles or 81 kilometers across) is elongated and irregular in shape. Mimas (246 miles or 396 kilometers across), a “medium-sized” moon, formed into a sphere due to self-gravity imposed by its higher mass
Nasa

10/30 Solar Flare

An X1.6 class solar flare flashes in the middle of the sun in this image taken 10 September, captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory
Nasa

11/30 Solar Flare

An image from Nasa’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows a 200,000 mile long solar filament ripping through the Sun’s corona in September 2013
Nasa

12/30 Cassiopeia A c

A false colour image of Cassiopeia A comprised with data from the Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes and the Chandra X-Ray observatory
Nasa

13/30 Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy

An image of the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy seen in infrared light by the Herschel Space Observatory. Regions of space such as this are where new stars are born from a mixture of elements and cosmic dust
Nasa

14/30 Mars Rover Spirit

Nasa’s Mars Rover Spirit took the first picture from Spirit since problems with communications began a week earlier. The image shows the robotic arm extended to the rock called Adirondack
Nasa

15/30 Morning Aurora From the Space Station

Nasa astronaut Scott Kelly captured this photograph of the green lights of the aurora from the International Space Station

16/30 Launch of History – Making STS-41G Mission in 1984

The Space Shuttle Challenger launches from Florida at dawn. On this mission, Kathryn Sullivan became the first U.S. woman to perform a spacewalk and Marc Garneau became the first Canadian in space. The crew of seven was the largest to fly on a spacecraft at that time, and STS-41G was the first flight to include two female astronauts

17/30 A Fresh Perspective on an Extraordinary Cluster of Galaxies

Galaxy clusters are often described by superlatives. After all, they are huge conglomerations of galaxies, hot gas, and dark matter and represent the largest structures in the Universe held together by gravity

18/30 Veil Nebula Supernova Remnant

Nasa’s Hubble Space Telescope has unveiled in stunning detail a small section of the Veil Nebula – expanding remains of a massive star that exploded about 8,000 years ago

19/30 Hubble Sees a Galactic Sunflower

The arrangement of the spiral arms in the galaxy Messier 63, seen here in an image from the Nasa Hubble Space Telescope, recall the pattern at the center of a sunflower

20/30 A Hubble Cosmic Couple

The spectacular cosmic pairing of the star Hen 2-427 — more commonly known as WR 124 — and the nebula M1-67 which surrounds it

21/30 Pluto image

Four images from New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) were combined with colour data from the Ralph instrument to create this enhanced colour global view of Pluto

22/30 Fresh Crater Near Sirenum Fossae Region of Mars

The HiRISE camera aboard Nasa’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter acquired this closeup image of a “fresh” (on a geological scale, though quite old on a human scale) impact crater in the Sirenum Fossae region of Mars. This impact crater appears relatively recent as it has a sharp rim and well-preserved ejecta

23/30 Earth Observations From Gemini IV in 1965

This photograph of the Florida Straits and Grand Bahama Bank was taken during the Gemini IV mission during orbit no. 19 in 1965. The Gemini IV crew conducted scientific experiments, including photography of Earth’s weather and terrain, for the remainder of their four-day mission following Ed White’s historic spacewalk on June 3

24/30 Nasa Celebrates 50 Years of Spacewalking

For 50 years, NASA has been “suiting up” for spacewalking. In this 1984 photograph of the first untethered spacewalk, NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless is in the midst of the first “field” tryout of a nitrogen-propelled backpack device called the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU)

25/30 Hubble Peers into the Most Crowded Place in the Milky Way

This Nasa Hubble Space Telescope image presents the Arches Cluster, the densest known star cluster in the Milky Way

26/30 An Astronaut’s View from Space

Nasa astronaut Reid Wiseman tweeted this photo from the International Space Station on 2 September 2014

27/30 Giant Landform on Mars

On Mars, we can observe four classes of sandy landforms formed by the wind, or aeolian bedforms: ripples, transverse aeolian ridges, dunes, and what are called “draa”

28/30 Expedition 39 Landing

A sokol suit helmet can be seen against the window of the Soyuz TMA-11M capsule shortly after the spacecraft landed with Expedition 39 Commander Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan

29/30 Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Viewed by Voyager I

30/30 Chandra Observatory Sees a Heart in the Darkness

1/30 Earth from the ISS

From the International Space Station, Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry W. Virts took this photograph of the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. Gulf Coast at sunset
Nasa

2/30 Frosty slopes of Mars

This image of an area on the surface of Mars, approximately 1.5 by 3 kilometers in size, shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. The image was taken by Nasa’s HiRISE camera, which is mounted on its Mars Reconaissance Orbiter
Nasa

3/30 Orion Capsule splashes down

The Orion capsule jetted off into space before heading back a few hours later — having proved that it can be used, one day, to carry humans to Mars
Nasa

4/30 The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launch

The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, carrying three new astronauts to the International Space Station. It also took caviar, ready for the satellite’s inhabitants to celebrate the holidays
Nasa

5/30 Yellowstone from space

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman shared this image of Yellowstone via his twitter account
Nasa

6/30 Black Hole Friday

Nasa celebrated Black Friday by looking into space instead — sharing pictures of black holes
Nasa

7/30 NuSTAR

X-rays stream off the sun in this image showing observations from by NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)
Nasa

8/30 Saturn

This near-infrared color image shows a specular reflection, or sunglint, off of a hydrocarbon lake named Kivu Lacus on Saturn’s moon Titan
Nasa

9/30 Worlds Apart

Although Mimas and Pandora, shown here, both orbit Saturn, they are very different moons. Pandora, “small” by moon standards (50 miles or 81 kilometers across) is elongated and irregular in shape. Mimas (246 miles or 396 kilometers across), a “medium-sized” moon, formed into a sphere due to self-gravity imposed by its higher mass
Nasa

10/30 Solar Flare

An X1.6 class solar flare flashes in the middle of the sun in this image taken 10 September, captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory
Nasa

11/30 Solar Flare

An image from Nasa’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows a 200,000 mile long solar filament ripping through the Sun’s corona in September 2013
Nasa

12/30 Cassiopeia A c

A false colour image of Cassiopeia A comprised with data from the Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes and the Chandra X-Ray observatory
Nasa

13/30 Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy

An image of the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy seen in infrared light by the Herschel Space Observatory. Regions of space such as this are where new stars are born from a mixture of elements and cosmic dust
Nasa

14/30 Mars Rover Spirit

Nasa’s Mars Rover Spirit took the first picture from Spirit since problems with communications began a week earlier. The image shows the robotic arm extended to the rock called Adirondack
Nasa

15/30 Morning Aurora From the Space Station

Nasa astronaut Scott Kelly captured this photograph of the green lights of the aurora from the International Space Station

16/30 Launch of History – Making STS-41G Mission in 1984

The Space Shuttle Challenger launches from Florida at dawn. On this mission, Kathryn Sullivan became the first U.S. woman to perform a spacewalk and Marc Garneau became the first Canadian in space. The crew of seven was the largest to fly on a spacecraft at that time, and STS-41G was the first flight to include two female astronauts

17/30 A Fresh Perspective on an Extraordinary Cluster of Galaxies

Galaxy clusters are often described by superlatives. After all, they are huge conglomerations of galaxies, hot gas, and dark matter and represent the largest structures in the Universe held together by gravity

18/30 Veil Nebula Supernova Remnant

Nasa’s Hubble Space Telescope has unveiled in stunning detail a small section of the Veil Nebula – expanding remains of a massive star that exploded about 8,000 years ago

19/30 Hubble Sees a Galactic Sunflower

The arrangement of the spiral arms in the galaxy Messier 63, seen here in an image from the Nasa Hubble Space Telescope, recall the pattern at the center of a sunflower

20/30 A Hubble Cosmic Couple

The spectacular cosmic pairing of the star Hen 2-427 — more commonly known as WR 124 — and the nebula M1-67 which surrounds it

21/30 Pluto image

Four images from New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) were combined with colour data from the Ralph instrument to create this enhanced colour global view of Pluto

22/30 Fresh Crater Near Sirenum Fossae Region of Mars

The HiRISE camera aboard Nasa’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter acquired this closeup image of a “fresh” (on a geological scale, though quite old on a human scale) impact crater in the Sirenum Fossae region of Mars. This impact crater appears relatively recent as it has a sharp rim and well-preserved ejecta

23/30 Earth Observations From Gemini IV in 1965

This photograph of the Florida Straits and Grand Bahama Bank was taken during the Gemini IV mission during orbit no. 19 in 1965. The Gemini IV crew conducted scientific experiments, including photography of Earth’s weather and terrain, for the remainder of their four-day mission following Ed White’s historic spacewalk on June 3

24/30 Nasa Celebrates 50 Years of Spacewalking

For 50 years, NASA has been “suiting up” for spacewalking. In this 1984 photograph of the first untethered spacewalk, NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless is in the midst of the first “field” tryout of a nitrogen-propelled backpack device called the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU)

25/30 Hubble Peers into the Most Crowded Place in the Milky Way

This Nasa Hubble Space Telescope image presents the Arches Cluster, the densest known star cluster in the Milky Way

26/30 An Astronaut’s View from Space

Nasa astronaut Reid Wiseman tweeted this photo from the International Space Station on 2 September 2014

27/30 Giant Landform on Mars

On Mars, we can observe four classes of sandy landforms formed by the wind, or aeolian bedforms: ripples, transverse aeolian ridges, dunes, and what are called “draa”

28/30 Expedition 39 Landing

A sokol suit helmet can be seen against the window of the Soyuz TMA-11M capsule shortly after the spacecraft landed with Expedition 39 Commander Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan

29/30 Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Viewed by Voyager I

30/30 Chandra Observatory Sees a Heart in the Darkness

Mr Musk hopes that space travellers will eventually make their journey on SpaceX’s starship, a new craft that is going through the testing process.

A number of Twitter users asked the SpaceX boss what the public could do to support its development, apparently in the hope of being allowed to make trips to Mars as soon as possible.

“The goodwill of the public is critical to Starship’s success,” he wrote in one post.

He was then asked how he would ensure the public stayed engaged with the project. He joked that there would probably be some RUDs – rapid unscheduled disassemblies, which is how SpaceX refers to the events other people might call an exposion – but that there would be plenty to get excited about.

“Just planning on keeping the public informed about progress & setbacks,” he wrote about his plans. “Will be some RUDs along the way, but excitement is guaranteed!”

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