SpaceX successfully re-launches and recovers Falcon 9 flown in March

SpaceX’s launch today from California’s Vandenberg Air Force base went off today without a hitch, bringing three satellites that make up the …

SpaceX’s launch today from California’s Vandenberg Air Force Base went off without a hitch, carrying three satellites that make up the RADARSAT constellation to be used for observation by the Canadian government.

The launch today included use of a Falcon 9 first stage that flew a mission only a few months ago, when it carried SpaceX’s Crew Dragon capsule to orbit during an uncrewed demonstration mission in March. The first stage was refurbished and reflown, bringing SpaceX yet another step closer to its goal of narrowing the window between flights for its reusable rocketry further still.

SpaceX also recovered the first stage with a controlled landing back at the company’s LZ-4 landing pad at Vandenberg. SpaceX has now demonstrated its ability to land up to three boosters at once when launching its larger Falcon Heavy orbital rocket.

The SpaceX rocket also successfully deployed all three of its cargo of RADARSAT observation satellites into their respective target orbits, completing the mission for its customer MDA.

The next launch on the schedule for SpaceX is another Falcon Heavy launch set for June 24, which will be its third flight and its first for the US Air Force. On board, it’ll have the USAF’s Space Test Program Flight 2, which includes experimental small sat payloads and a number of research projects from NASA.

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SpaceX Dragon Completes 17th ISS Resupply Mission; Returns to Earth

The SpaceX-made Dragon spacecraft has returned to Earth, marking the completion of a delivery mission for the International Space Station, …
Jeff Brody

TheSpaceX-made Dragon spacecraft has returned to Earth, marking the completion of a delivery mission for the International Space Station, TechCrunchreported Monday.

During NASA’s 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission, the cargo capsule transported 5.5K pounds of supplies and research materials.

The mission concluded with a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, Spaceflight Nowreported Monday. Dragon returned with over 4.2K pounds of cargo from ISS.

SpaceXlaunched Dragon with a Falcon 9 rocket in early May from Cape Canaveral, Fla., for the mission. The company holds $3B in contracts for a total of 20 missions under the CRS program.

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SpaceX Dragon cargo ship splashes down

SpaceX’s robotic Dragon cargo spaceship looms above the International Space Station just before its release from the station’s robotic arm. (NASA …
SpaceX’s robotic Dragon cargo spaceship looms above the International Space Station just before its release from the station’s robotic arm. (NASA / CSA Photo / David Saint-Jacques)

A robotic SpaceX Dragon cargo capsule splashed down in the Pacific Ocean today, bringing two tons of scientific experiments and other hardware back to Earth a month after its launch to the International Space Station.

Nearly six hours after the Dragon was released from the space station, NASA and SpaceX reported a “good splashdown” at 2:48 p.m. PT, about 200 miles southwest of Long Beach, Calif.

Among the experiments carried back down from orbit were Biophysics-6, a protein growth experiment that could produce purer pharmaceuticals for cancer treatment and radiation protection; Genes in Space-6, which marked the first experiment to use CRISPR gene-editing tools and could open the way to DNA repair in deep space; and Microalgae Biosynthesis in Microgravity, which studies the effects of zero gravity on an algae that could produce antioxidant supplements for future astronaut diets.

Today’s splashdown brought an end to SpaceX’s 17th space station resupply mission under the terms of NASA contracts. This Dragon was previously used for resupply last August. After recovery from the ocean, the craft and its cargo will be brought back to shore, with expedited processing for time-sensitive experiments.

SpaceX’s next liftoff is set for no earlier than June 11, when a Falcon 9 is due to send three Canadian Radarsat satellites into orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. A Falcon Heavy launch is scheduled for June 22. That mission will send up satellites for the Air Force’s Space Test Program-2 from Kennedy Space Center in Florida, and will mark the first night launch of a Falcon Heavy.

The next Dragon cargo resupply mission to the space station is set for July 8.

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SpaceX Dragon set for ISS departure and Pacific Ocean splashdown

After a month at the International Space Station, a robotic SpaceX Dragon capsule that launched from Cape Canaveral in May will return for a Pacific …

Photos: SpaceX launches a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. MALCOLM DENEMARK/FLORIDA TODAY
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A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches from Cape Canaveral on the company's 17th resupply run to the International Space Station on Saturday, May 4, 2019. The rocket's first stage landing burns can be seen off to the right.

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A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches from Cape Canaveral on the company’s 17th resupply run to the International Space Station on Saturday, May 4, 2019. The rocket’s first stage landing burns can be seen off to the right. MALCOLM DENEMARK / FLORIDA TODAY
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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. MALCOLM DENEMARK/FLORIDA TODAY
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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. TIM SHORTT/ FLORIDA TODAY
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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. TIM SHORTT/ FLORIDA TODAY
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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. TIM SHORTT/ FLORIDA TODAY
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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. TIM SHORTT/ FLORIDA TODAY
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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. TIM SHORTT/ FLORIDA TODAY
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After a month at the International Space Station, a robotic SpaceX Dragon capsule that launched from Cape Canaveral in May will return for a Pacific Ocean splashdown early next week.

Packed with 4,200 pounds of scientific results for experts back on Earth, Dragon will be released from the station around noon Monday, kicking off its six-hour journey to just off the coast of California. Parachute-assisted splashdown is expected at 2:55 p.m. Pacific time.

The spacecraft launched on one previous mission – Commercial Resupply Services 12 in August 2017 – before its May 4 liftoff from Launch Complex 40. SpaceX’s next mission to the ISS is expected no earlier than July.

Before that, however, the company is targeting June 22 for the high-profile launch of dozens of Department of Defense and NASA payloads on a Falcon Heavy rocket. The three-core vehicle will launch from Kennedy Space Center’s pad 39A.

Contact Emre Kelly at aekelly@floridatoday.com or 321-242-3715. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram at @EmreKelly.

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SpaceX launches 60 Starlink communications satellites on a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral on Thursday, May 23, 2019. Florida Today

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SpaceX makes a 5500-pound delivery to ISS

SpaceX launched its Falcon 9 rocket Saturday after a destroyed capsule in April and an electrical issue on Friday. On Monday morning, it completed …
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The Dragon capsule.

NASA/SpaceX

SpaceX launched its Falcon 9 rocket Saturday on the heels of a destroyed capsule in April and an electrical issue on Friday. On Monday morning, it completed a delivery to the International Space Station.

The uncrewed Dragon cargo spacecraft containing 5,500 pounds of supplies, hardware and materials, including more than 250 science and research investigations to take place on the ISS, was captured by the station’s robotic arm at 4:01 a.m. PT Monday morning. It was then installed onto the station’s Harmony module at 6:32 a.m. PT.

NASA on Monday tweeted out a time-lapse video of cargo craft being captured.

Checkout this incredible time lapse video of this morning’s capture of the @SpaceX Dragon cargo craft by astronaut @Astro_DavidS of @CSA_ASC, backed up by @AstroHague of @NASA. #AskNASA | https://t.co/cBNqC5JGazpic.twitter.com/IUp0FnpoW2

— Intl. Space Station (@Space_Station) May 6, 2019

After four weeks at the ISS, the Dragon, with a cargo of 4,400 pounds, will leave the space station and begin its return to Earth, splashing down in the Pacific Ocean near Baja California.

SpaceX had its first successful Dragon mission back in March when it delivered 400 pounds of supplies and equipment. That mission also had its own setbacks.

SpaceX didn’t immediately to a request for comment.

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