SpaceX Dragon installed at ISS after launch from Cape Canaveral

After launching from Cape Canaveral over the weekend, a SpaceX Dragon capsule packed with thousands of pounds of supplies arrived at the …

Photos: SpaceX launches a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. MALCOLM DENEMARK/FLORIDA TODAY
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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. MALCOLM DENEMARK/FLORIDA TODAY
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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. MALCOLM DENEMARK/FLORIDA TODAY
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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. TIM SHORTT/ FLORIDA TODAY
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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. TIM SHORTT/ FLORIDA TODAY
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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. TIM SHORTT/ FLORIDA TODAY
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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. TIM SHORTT/ FLORIDA TODAY
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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.

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SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket on May 4, 2019 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40 for its 17th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. TIM SHORTT/ FLORIDA TODAY
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After launching from Cape Canaveral over the weekend, a SpaceX Dragon capsule packed with thousands of pounds of supplies arrived at the International Space Station Monday, kicking off the work week for the outpost’s six-person crew.

At 9:32 a.m. Eastern time, astronauts using the station’s robotic arm installed the previously flown capsule, setting the stage for its unloading over the next few weeks. Launch Complex 40 hosted its departure on a Falcon 9 rocket at 2:48 a.m. Saturday with more than 5,500 pounds of supplies, cargo and science experiments.

After astronauts unpack and re-pack the spacecraft with experiments for return to Earth, Dragon will target a Pacific Ocean splashdown in the first week of June. This particular capsule previously flew on SpaceX’s 12th resupply mission to the ISS in August 2017.

Dragon joined five other spacecraft parked at the station this morning: two Russian Soyuz, two Russian Progress and a Northrop Grumman Cygnus.

The station’s crew includes Americans Anne McClain, Christina Koch and Nick Hague; Canadian David Saint-Jacques; and Russians Oleg Kononenko and Aleksey Ovchinin.

Teams back on the ground, meanwhile, are targeting no earlier than mid-May for the launch of a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station with SpaceX-built Starlink communications satellites. The company last year secured permission from the Federal Communications Commission to begin operating its internet-beaming constellation that is planned to include 11,000 satellites in low-Earth orbit.

Until then, the Air Force’s 45th Space Wing will be performing routine maintenance on the Eastern Range, known as a re-capitalization period.

Contact Emre Kelly at aekelly@floridatoday.com or 321-242-3715. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram at @EmreKelly.

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Saturday, May 4, 2019: SpaceX launches a Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft for the CRS-17 mission to resupply the International Space Station. Florida Today

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Canadarm 2 to perform ‘cosmic catch’ when SpaceX rocket arrives at ISS with supplies

WATCH: A SpaceX rocket launched on Saturday headed for the International Space Station to bring supplies following a pair of power delays.

SpaceX launched a load of supplies to the International Space Station on Saturday following a pair of unusual power delays, and now a Canadian astronaut will be waiting to snatch it when it arrives.

A Falcon rocket raced into the pre-dawn darkness on Saturday, carrying a Dragon capsule with about 2,500 kilograms of goods. This recycled Dragon – which is making its second space voyage – is due to arrive at the orbiting lab early Monday.

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That’s when Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques will be pressed into duty, manning the Canadarm 2 to perform his first-ever “cosmic catch” manoeuvre, backed up by NASA astronaut Nick Hague.

“We’re ready to capture with #Canadarm2 on Monday!,” Saint-Jacques tweeted.

This latest cargo Dragon – marking the company’s 17th shipment – is carrying equipment and experiments for the six space station astronauts, including an instrument to monitor carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere.

WATCH: SpaceX Dragon capsule’s “picture perfect” Atlantic splashdown

Another part of the cargo aboard the Dragon capsule is 1.2 million tomato seeds heading to space as part of the Tomatosphere educational project.

The Canadian Space Agency says in a release the seeds will return to Earth a month later, along with blood and breath samples for a Canadian health probe into the impact of living in space on astronauts’ bone marrow.

SpaceX has been restocking the station since 2012.

The Saturday launch went smoothly, with the booster streaking to a smooth landing on a recovery ship just offshore.

WATCH: SpaceX Crew Dragon docks at International Space Station

The delivery was a few days late because of electrical power shortages that cropped up first at the space station, then at SpaceX’s rocket-landing platform in the Atlantic. Both problems were quickly resolved with equipment replacements: a power-switching unit in orbit and a generator at sea.

SpaceX couldn’t resist the Star Wars Day connection – Saturday is May 4.

“Dragon is now officially on the way to the space station,” the SpaceX launch commentator announced once the capsule reached orbit and its solar wings unfurled. “Until next time, May the Fourth be with you.”

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SpaceX launches Falcon 9 rocket to the International Space Station on Star Wars Day

Falcon 9, which Elon Musk reportedly named after the iconic Millennium Falcon from Star Wars, blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

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SpaceX launched a rocket loaded with supplies for the International Space Station on Star Wars Day.

Falcon 9, which Elon Musk reportedly named after the iconic Millennium Falcon from Star Wars, blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

SpaceX continued to tout the Star Wars Day connection as the craft blasted off.

“Dragon is now officially on the way to the space station,” the SpaceX launch commentator announced once the capsule reached orbit and its solar wings unfurled. “Until next time, May the Fourth be with you.”

The shipment is set to arrive on Monday

The Star Wars catchphrase is usually “may the force be with you”, with fans adapting it on May 4.

​The rocket raced into the pre-dawn darkness, carrying a Dragon capsule with 2,500 kilograms of goods and is due to arrive at the orbiting lab Monday.

It set off from Cape Canaveral

Its booster streaked to a smooth landing on a recovery ship just offshore.

The delivery is a few days late because of electrical power shortages which emerged first at the space station then at SpaceX’s rocket-landing platform in the Atlantic.

It is the 17th shipment being delivered by SpaceX to the ISS

Both problems were quickly resolved with equipment replacements.

Minutes after liftoff, SpaceX landed its brand new first-stage booster on the ocean platform roughly 16 kilometres off the coast, considerably closer than usual with the sonic booms easily heard at the launch site.

“That looked really, really cool in the night sky,” said Hans Koenigsmann, a SpaceX vice president.

He had left his launch control seat to run outside and watch.

SpaceX has been restocking the space station since 2012 and this latest cargo Dragon, the company’s 17th shipment, is carrying equipment and experiments for the six space station astronauts, including an instrument to monitor carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere.

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SpaceX launches supplies to space station, confirms crew capsule destroyed

SpaceX launched a load of supplies to the International Space Station on Saturday following a pair of unusual power delays. The launch came two …

SpaceX launched a load of supplies to the International Space Station on Saturday following a pair of unusual power delays. The launch came two days after the company confirmed its crew capsule was destroyed in ground testing two weeks ago and conceded that the accident is “not great news” for its effort to launch astronauts this year.

A Falcon rocket raced into the pre-dawn darkness, carrying a Dragon capsule with 5,500 pounds (2,500 kilograms) of goods. This recycled Dragon — which is making its second space trip — is due to arrive at the orbiting lab Monday.

The booster, meanwhile, streaked to a smooth landing on a recovery ship just offshore.

“This is usually a routine task for SpaceX,” CNN reported. “But the latest launch, originally scheduled for earlier this week, was plagued by unusual hangups on its path to the launch pad, including a rare electrical issue aboard the space station.”

SpaceX couldn’t resist the Star Wars Day connection — Saturday is May 4, the unofficial Star Wars holiday, i.e. “May the Fourth be with you.”

“Dragon is now officially on the way to the space station,” the SpaceX launch commentator announced once the capsule reached orbit and its solar wings unfurled. “Until next time, May the Fourth be with you.”

The Dragon spacecraft is capable of carrying up to 7 passengers to and from Earth orbit, and beyond, according to SpaceX. The pressurized section of the capsule is designed to carry both people and environmentally sensitive cargo. Towards the base of the capsule and contained within the nose cone are the Draco thrusters, which allow for orbital maneuvering.

Dragon’s trunk not only carries unpressurized cargo but also supports the spacecraft during ascent. The trunk remains attached to Dragon until shortly before reentry into Earth’s atmosphere, the company adds.

With Ripley on board, six-day test flight set for SpaceX Dragon capsule

The Saturday delivery is a few days late because of electrical power shortages that cropped up first at the space station, then at SpaceX’s rocket-landing platform in the Atlantic. Both problems were quickly resolved with equipment replacements: a power-switching unit in orbit and a generator at sea.

Minutes after liftoff, SpaceX landed its brand new, first-stage booster on the ocean platform roughly 10 miles (16 kilometers) off the coast, considerably closer than usual with the sonic booms easily heard at the launch site.

“That looked really, really cool in the night sky,” said Hans Koenigsmann, a SpaceX vice president who left his launch control seat to run outside and watch.

The booster likely will be reused for SpaceX’s next station supply run. That’s why the company and NASA halted Friday’s countdown at the last minute — so the recovery ship could be repaired and have full power for the landing operation. It was the first time a launch like this was nixed by rocket-landing concerns.

The booster should have returned to Cape Canaveral, but SpaceX is still cleaning up from the April 20 accident that destroyed an empty crew Dragon capsule.

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Koenigsmann said earlier this week the company still does not know what caused the empty capsule to burst apart in flames on a test stand. The capsule’s SuperDraco launch-abort thrusters were just a half-second from firing when the blast occurred.

This first crew capsule had completed a successful test flight, minus a crew, to the space station in March. SpaceX intended to refly the capsule on a launch-abort test in June, ahead of the first flight with astronauts on a new crew Dragon. The schedule is now up in the air, as SpaceX scrambles to identify and correct whatever went wrong.

SpaceX has been restocking the station since 2012.

This latest cargo Dragon — making the company’s 17th shipment — is carrying equipment and experiments for the six space station astronauts, including an instrument to monitor carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere.

The California-based company is also under contract with NASA, along with Boeing, to transport astronauts to the space station. It’s unclear whether these commercial crew flights will begin this year, given the Dragon accident and Boeing’s own delays with its Starliner capsule.

Astronauts have not launched from Cape Canaveral since the last space shuttle mission in 2011, instead riding Russian rockets at a steep cost to NASA.

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Watch: SpaceX rockets blasts off from Cape Canaveral

Barely 24 hours before the launch, a test of the company’s Crew Dragon capsule was also disrupted by an explosion, something SpaceX labelled “an …

After several delays, SpaceX’s Dragon supply ship has finally taken off from Florida’s Cape Canaveral base.

The private spacecraft took off around 3 am local time on Saturday, ending a lead-up to the supply mission that was plagued by unusual delays. The craft’s reusable boosters usefully landed on floating platforms in the ocean, known as Droneships.

The spacecraft, tasked with transporting essential supplies to the International Space Station, had been scheduled to take place on Wednesday, but it was delayed as controllers attempted to fix an issue with the electrical distribution unit. The failure left the craft operating at only 75% of its usual power supply.

Barely 24 hours before the launch, a test of the company’s Crew Dragon capsule was also disrupted by an explosion, something SpaceX labelled “an anomaly”.

That fix was successful, and the spacecraft now heads to the International Space Station, a journey which is expected to take at least two days.

This is SpaceX’s 17th supply mission for NASA. The private company was contracted to transport a payload of almost 3 tonnes which included technology that will be used to map and measure Carbon Dioxide levels in the earth’s atmosphere.

Controversial entrepreneur Elon Musk founded the company SpaceX in 2002, with the aim of making space travel affordable for all.

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