SpaceX is on a major hiring spree – openings up 160% in 2019

There are few things we love seeing more than hiring sprees at Elon Musk’s private space company, SpaceX ($SPACEX). That’s because the …

There are few things we love seeing more than hiring sprees at Elon Musk’s private space company, SpaceX ($SPACEX). That’s because the company that is privatizing getting humans to space stations and Mars and launching a low-orbit broadband satellite network is pushing space exploration — and technology — forward in quantum leaps.

In this case, we’ve observed a sustained hiring spree at SpaceX dating back to early 2019. At that time, job openings dropped to just 143 as the company shuttered several projects in order to move onto others. It seems the latter is happening now, as openings have soared to 372, an increase of 160%.

By looking at which job categories have moved up the ranks since January, we can see that “Vehicle Engineering” has seen major growth in terms of job listings at SpaceX’s careers site, and is now second only to Production.

In Vehicle Engineering alone, openings have moved from a low of 17 in January to 72 this week — an increase of 324%. The 72 job titles are extremely diverse with very little redundancy. Only “Antenna Engineer”, “FPGA/ASIC Verification Engineer”, “Supervisor, Tank Fabrication”, “Tank Fabricator/Welder – Temporary”, and “Build Engineer (Starship)” had more than one iteration.

For serious space nerds, the full list of Vehicle Engineering openings as of August 10 is listed below in its entirety:

Title

Ticker Symbol (Count)

Antenna Engineer

2

FPGA/ASIC Verification Engineer

2

Supervisor, Tank Fabrication

2

Tank Fabricator/Welder – Temporary

2

Build Engineer (Starship)

2

Deburr Technician (Valves Factory Machining Center)

1

Launch Logistics Specialist (2nd Shift)

1

Manufacturing Specialist

1

Mechanical Designer (Starlink)

1

CNC R&D Machinist

1

Avionics Hardware Test Engineer (Starlink)

1

Network Engineer (Starlink)

1

Build Specialist – Temporary

1

PCB Designer

1

Power Electronics Engineer

1

Production Manager (Thermal Protection Systems)

1

Aerodynamics Engineer

1

Propulsion Components Engineering Leadership Development Program

1

Production Coordinator (User Terminal)

1

Dragon 2 Mechanical Engineer

1

Power Engineer

1

Propulsion Components Manufacturing Engineer

1

Manufacturing Development Engineer (Starlink User Terminal)

1

Propulsion Engineer (Thermal & Fluid Analysis)

1

RF/Microwave Engineer

1

Sr. Hardware Development Electrical Engineer

1

Hardware Development Electrical Engineer

1

Dragon Life Support Systems Engineer

1

Sr. Hardware Development Engineer (User Terminal)

1

Sr. Wireless Protocol Software Engineer

1

GNC Satellite Attitude Determination & Control Engineer

1

Machining Process Engineer

1

Falcon Engineer

1

Mechanical Engineer (Vehicle Development)

1

GNC Engineer (Starship)

1

Technical Project Lead (Payload)

1

Dragon Integration and Test Engineer

1

Sheet Metal Technician (Starship)

1

Build Engineer, Optics

1

Broadband Communications Integration Engineer

1

Propulsion Test Technician (2nd shift)

1

Thermal Development Technician

1

Logistics Technician – Temporary

1

Test Development Technician

1

Lead CNC Machinist

1

Hardware Development Electrical Engineer (Antenna)

1

Thermal Engineer

1

Compliance Engineer

1

Propulsion Components Technician

1

Vehicle Integration Technician (Starship) – Temporary

1

Sr. Hardware Development Engineer (Laser Communications Design)

1

CNC Programmer

1

Hardware Development Engineer (User Terminal)

1

Dragon 2 Heat Shield Design Engineer

1

Starlink Fleet Planning and Operations Engineer

1

Tube Bender (Starship) – Temporary

1

Vehicle Integration Technician – Temporary

1

CNC Lathe Machinist

1

Sr. Hardware Development Engineer (Phased Array Systems)

1

NDE Level II Technician – Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection (PAUT)

1

Sr. RF/Microwave Engineer

1

Dragon 2 Heat Shield Build Engineer

1

Dynamics Engineer

1

Sr. Power Electronics Engineer

1

Wireless Protocol Software Engineer

1

RF and Modem Integration Engineer

1

About the Data:

Thinknum tracks companies using information they post online – jobs, social and web traffic, product sales and app ratings – and creates data sets that measure factors like hiring, revenue and foot traffic. Data sets may not be fully comprehensive (they only account for what is available on the web), but they can be used to gauge performance factors like staffing and sales.

Further Reading:

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts

SpaceX increases naval fleet

SpaceX has had something of a maritime fleet from its beginnings. Its ‘Of course I still love you’ floating barge has been the landing stage for many of …
August 15, 2019

SpaceX has had something of a maritime fleet from its beginnings. Its ‘Of course I still love you’ floating barge has been the landing stage for many of SpaceX flights. The second floating barge, with the giant text message saying “Just read the instructions” does a similar job usually on the Pacific.

Elon Musk’s team also had a vessel that was deliberately equipped to recover the expensive rocket fairings by means of a giant net. The vessel was called ‘Mr Steven’ and it operated on both the Atlantic and Pacific, shuttling through the Panama Canal like a ferry boat!

Musk renamed GO Mr Steven, and he – because all ships are ‘she’ – became GO Ms Tree. Then along came another vessel, named Ms Chief.

These names are reportedly drawn from Ms Tree sounding like Mystery, and Ms Chief sounding like Mischief. The ‘GO’ element is because the vessels were sourced from Guice Offshore.

Their role is to – together with a mini fleet of other recovery vessels: to catch, or recover, rocket fairings that are valued at some $5-$6 million for each pair.

Each fairing is equipped with small thrusters which help guide them to the target ocean ‘landing’ area. The fairings also each have a parachute to slow their fall, and aid a successful capture.

The boats are each 62m length x 10m beam, and have decks certified for loads of up to 400 metric tonnes. They have top speeds of 26-32 knots (50-60 km/h).

The math for SpaceX is straightforward. Even if the two ships cost – say – $10 million each, then that $20 million invested would be recovered in 4-5 successful ‘captures’ and offset the building of new fairings. Subsequent captures would be highly profitable. Even if the vessels cost twice as much the profit kicks in at about 10 captures.

Elon Musk needs to see plenty of success in these fairing capture tasks – as well as the floating drone vessels – when he starts launching his extensive ‘Starlink’ multiple satellite launches.

OneWeb claims a win in its race for space-based internet with Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos

OneWeb said it has secured vital rights to the airwaves it needs to launch a global satellite broadband network. The startup backed by Softbank Corp.

OneWeb said it has secured vital rights to the airwaves it needs to launch a global satellite broadband network.

The start-up backed by Softbank Corp. is racing against billionaires Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos to install constellations of small satellites so they can offer 4G-like broadband to places that are too costly to reach using terrestrial networks.

By getting six of the washing machine-sized satellites broadcasting at the right frequencies for 90 days, OneWeb has met “use-it-or-lose-it” spectrum conditions set by the United Nations’ International Telecommunication Union, the company said by email.

Musk’s Space Exploration Technologies Corp. and Bezos’ Project Kuiper are likely to need the same spectrum. OneWeb says that being the first to file its claim and have it validated will mean signals from other operators must not interfere with its own, under rules that oblige latecomers to preserve the quality of services offered by an incumbent.

Advertisement

“That could mean a longer road to the finish line for others than it is for us,” said Ruth Pritchard-Kelly, OneWeb’s vice president of regulation.

la-1561667980-1z6u8g9qv4-snap-image
Elon Musk and SpaceX have staked their legacy on a spaceship capable of carrying a hundred passengers to Mars.

U.K. communications watchdog Ofcom will now ask the ITU to register OneWeb’s priority claim on the bandwidth. An ITU spokeswoman said the Geneva-based body had not yet received frequency claims for the OneWeb or SpaceX projects.

OneWeb has raised $3.4 billion from shareholders including Softbank, Airbus, Richard Branson’s Virgin Corp. and Qualcomm Inc. and plans to launch about 30 of the satellites per month starting in December to create an initial constellation of 648. Because they are thousands of miles closer to Earth than traditional models, they promise much lower transmission delays than existing satellite broadband services.

Advertisement

Musk’s SpaceX is also moving fast, sending dozens of satellites into orbit for its Starlink project and preparing for more launches this year after winning U.S. government approval for about 12,000 satellites. Project Kuiper has yet to launch any of its satellites.

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts

The Global Small Satellite Market Projected to Reach $2.9 Billion by 2030

Some of the key players in the global small satellite market includes BAE Systems, Planet Labs, SSTL, SSL, Innovative Solutions In Space BV, The …

FREMONT, California, Aug. 7, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — According to a new market intelligence report by BIS Research titled “Global Small Satellite Market – Analysis and Forecast, 2019 – 2030“, the global small satellite market was generated a revenue of $513.6 million in 2018 and is expected to reach $2.9 billion by 2030. The market is anticipated to grow at a significant CAGR of 14.15%, during the forecast period from 2019 to 2030.

Browse 14 market Data Tables and 151 Figures spread through 233 Pages, and in-depth TOC on “Global Small Satellite Market

The growth of the market is aided by the development of low-cost small satellites enabled by the miniaturization of components of satellites. There has been a robust growth in the small satellite market over the years, however, developing safe, low-cost, and small payload satellites to launch beyond low-earth orbit, and cleanup and removal of space debris are the major restraints for the market.

Globally, several nations are keen to launch their own small satellites and are actively collaborating with space-faring agencies currently. With the increase in the capabilities of small satellites, the space industry is developing their increasing strategic utility, thus motivating various stakeholders including government, space agencies and private companies to develop dedicated and next-generation small satellite constellations.

BIS Research Report: https://bisresearch.com/industry-report/small-satellite-market.html

Presently, small satellites are being increasingly used for applications such as weather forecast, surveillance, earth observation, navigation, communication, meteorology, and other purposes. Of late, there has been an increased demand for efficient small satellite constellations for providing better connectivity for smart devices, Internet of Things (IoT), increased data analytics, and migration to streaming broadband.

According to Swati Chaturvedi, Lead Analyst at BIS Research,“Small satellite industry is rapidly moving ahead to adopt small and lightweight swarm of satellites with equal power and higher agility. The next big trend in the market is the emergence of autonomous small satellites, which are capable to undertake fault corrections independently and avoid any sort of mishap in the orbit. Furthermore, small satellite technology is actively leading the paradigm shift in the satellite industry with its capability complimenting the heavy satellites and shorter lead-time. Companies like OneWeb, are planning to build satellite factories, wherein they are expected to produce up to 15 satellites per week. These companies have laid the foundation of adoption of economies of scale streamlined with production and it is expected that management practices like lean manufacturing and a just-in-time supply chain are expected to increase efficiencies and profitability for the companies during the forecast period.”

Request for a sample: https://bisresearch.com/requestsample?id=727&type=download

The market report provides a detailed analysis of the recent trends influencing the market, along with a comprehensive study of the future trends and technological developments. It also includes a competitive analysis of the leading players in the industry, including corporate overview, financial summary, and SWOT analysis. The overall market has been segmented into end user, application, subsystem, type, and region.

Some of the key players in the global small satellite market includes BAE Systems, Planet Labs, SSTL, SSL, Innovative Solutions In Space BV, The Boeing Company, Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems, Inc., Airbus S.A.S, Harris Corporation, Lockheed Martin Corporation, Thales Group, Northrop Grumman Corporation, OHB System, OneWeb, and QinetiQ Group PLC. These companies are aiming for a wide range of product launches and collaborations to expand their operations and also to prevent new companies from becoming future competitors. At the same time, a number of startup companies are venturing into the market to provide small satellites to a variety of end users.

Key Questions Answered in the Report:

  • What are the prime demand-side factors that affect the growth of the market and the current and future trends, market drivers, restraints, and challenges prevalent in the global small satellite market?
  • What is the detailed analysis of value chain analysis and small satellite service market?
  • Who are the key players present in the global small satellite market and how much is the market share of each player?
  • How is the market based on different end users such as commercial, government, academic, and defense expected to grow during the forecast period?
  • How is the global small satellite market analysis based on the application segment, such as technology development and demonstration, earth observation and remote sensing, communication, space exploration, and surveillance expected to grow by 2030 and how was the scenario during 2018?
  • How is the global small satellite market based on the type segment, such as femtosatellite, picosatellite, nanosatellite, microsatellite, and minisatellite expected to grow by 2030 and how was the scenario during 2018?
  • How is the global small satellite market based on the subsystem segment, such as payload, structure, telecommunication, on-board computer, power system, attitude control system, and propulsion system expected to grow by 2030 and how was the scenario during 2018?
  • How is the global small satellite market based on the services segment, such as mission planning, environment test verification, and satellite launch services expected to grow by 2030 and how was the scenario during 2018?
  • How is the global small satellite market based on major geographies analyzed in the report for the major geographies including North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and Rest-of-the-World? How is each geography expected to grow and perform during the forecast period?

Related Reports

https://bisresearch.com/industry-report/global-cubesat-market-2022.html

https://bisresearch.com/industry-report/global-small-satellites-market-2021.html

https://bisresearch.com/industry-report/global-airborne-lidar-system-market-2021.html

About BIS Research:

BIS Research is a global B2B market intelligence and advisory firm focusing on those emerging technological trends, which are likely to disrupt the dynamics of the market.

With over 150 market research reports published annually, BIS Research focuses on high technology verticals such as 3D Printing, Advanced Materials and Chemicals, Aerospace and Defense, Automotive, Healthcare, Electronics and Semiconductors, Robotics and UAV, and other emerging technologies.

Our in-depth market intelligence reports focus on the market estimations, technology analysis, emerging high-growth applications, deeply segmented granular country-level market data, and other important market parameters useful in the strategic decision-making for senior management.

What distinguishes BIS Research from the rest of the players is that we don’t simply provide data but also complement it with valuable insights and actionable inputs for the success of our clients.

Contact:

Bhavya Banga

Email: media@bisresearch.com

39111 PASEO PADRE PKWY STE 313,

FREMONT CA 94538-1686

Visit our Blog @ http://bisresearch.com/blog/

Connect with us on LinkedIn @ https://www.linkedin.com/company/bis-research

Connect with us on Twitter@ https://twitter.com/BISResearch

Logo: https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/495163/BIS_Research_Logo.jpg

SOURCE BIS Research

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts

Satellites are real-time spies in the sky

Imaging company Planet Labs confirmed that it has 140 imaging satellites currently in orbit. The report says this is enough to pass over every place on …
starshot-satellite-launch

Satellites deserve a closer look.

Darius Farraye/CNET

Dramatic advances in satellite imaging technology in the last 10 years have privacy advocates worried about 24-hour surveillance. Right now, US regulations keep things in check. Commercial satellite imagery is powerful enough to see a car, for example, but isn’t allowed to be detailed enough to identify the make and model, according to the MIT Technology Review. But innovations may soon skirt the government’s rules.

Satellite companies also say they keep a person’s data separate from any identifying characteristics, but Peter Martinez of the Secure World Foundation said that doesn’t matter.

“The risks arise not only from the satellite images themselves but the fusion of Earth observation data with other sources of data,” Martinez said in an email.

Now playing:Watch this: Are SpaceX Starlink satellites ruining the night sky?
2:57

Then there’s the sheer volume of satellites overhead. Imaging company Planet Labs confirmed that it has 140 imaging satellites currently in orbit. That’s a big chunk of the nearly 770 such satellites in total, according to MIT Technology Review. The report says that Planet Labs alone has enough satellites to pass over every place on Earth once a day.

“Even with Planet’s highest resolution imagery (1m resolution), it remains impossible to distinguish individual people, car number plates, or otherwise identifying information. Our imagery is ideal for monitoring large-scale change on a daily basis. This includes seeing daily change across buildings and roads, forests, in agriculture, bodies of water and more,” a spokesperson for Planet Labs said in an email.

The publication points out that the observational satellites can do good, too. They can help farmers monitor a crop’s growth cycle, geologists better examine rock textures, and human rights organizations track refugee movement. And of course, other satellites do things like helping meteorologists predict the weather and making our phones and televisions work.

Charlie Loyd, an imagery specialist at online mapmaker Mapbox, said that potential weaknesses and privacy problems differ between satellites and people’s expectations.

“Most people I talk with actually overestimate how often and how clearly satellites photograph their neighborhood. Few places on Earth are seen from space at highest resolution more than once a month or so, and the clearest images are from airplanes, not satellites. We rarely talk about the privacy risks from airplanes, partly because most of us have a realistic sense of what they can do,” Loyd said in an email.

Loyd said it’s the responsibility of the Earth observation industry, which knows what satellites can do, to educate those who don’t — especially when it comes to easing unrealistic fears and starting conversations about real risks.

A licensing system and accountability do exist, he said. That falls under space law, as much as it might conjure Star Trek in one’s mind.

“There’s a whole international and domestic legal framework around access to space, how orbital slots are divided up, how hardware should behave in space, and so on,” Loyd said.

There’s no sensor in orbit, or proposed for launch, that he considers worrisome. Loyd noted that, by themselves, the images are only pixels.

“And just as its strengths come almost entirely from its place in a system of other information sources, its privacy threats would come almost entirely from the abuse of that system,” Loyd said. “Answering those threats (whether in the public or private sectors, US or foreign, targeted or not) has less to do with satellites than with governance.”

Originally published July 26.

Update, July 29: Adds response from Planet Labs and Patrick Martinez.

Update Aug. 1: Adds response from Mapbox’s Charlie Loyd.

What will the moon look like in 50 years?: A scientific outpost, a graveyard, a stepping stone to Mars. It all starts with the moon.

I lived like a moon astronaut for the day: Preparing for life on the moon or Mars here on Earth is serious business.

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts