Infosys Ltd.(INFY, 500209) Stock & Share Price Update With Analysis – September 10, 2019

Infosys Ltd. opened at Rs. 836.80 today after closing at Rs. 840.15 … One stock of Infosys Ltd. was seen to be priced at Rs. 829.1 while a change of …

Updated at 9.09 AM

The prices of Infosys Ltd. touched a high of Rs. 840.30 which was 3.5 points more than the opening price after which it closed at Rs.840.15 yesterday.

Also, it saw a minimum of Rs. 827.55 which was 9.25 points less than the opening price.

4,377,665 was the last recorded volume of the day with the 5 day average volume being 6,810,805 , the 10 day average volume being 7,613,430 and the 30 day average volume being 7,287,665 stocks.

The 5 day average volume fell 344714 stocks, 10 day average volume rose 88435 stocks and 30 day average volume fell 155858 stocks when compared to the previous day’s values.

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A Year After Armageddon, Stock Traders Stare Into a Familiar Abyss

Ray Dalio, the billionaire founder of Bridgewater Associates, said there’s about a 25% chance of a U.S. recession this year and in 2020 and that …

(Bloomberg) — Nobody knew it then, but this time last year, the rallying U.S. stock market was about to begin a plunge that would erase $5 trillion from share values and convince a lot of people a recession was at hand.

Then, as now, a trade war was raging, earnings in doubt and manufacturing losing steam. In the stock market, swings were getting violent — even as the S&P 500 was pulling itself over 2,900 and flirting with an all-time high. Fast-forward to today, and the picture bears an eerie similarity.

Two things stand out in the comparison. One, a recession never came. Forecasting the economy is hard, something the market gets wrong as often as humans. Two, shock waves from last year’s plunge are still being felt, cementing Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell in his role as the main lifeline for risk assets.

“He’s on a tight rope like no other central banker has been before,” Chad Morganlander, a fund manager at Washington Crossing Advisors. “His message and his signal has been one to take a more balanced approach in the central bank’s behavior. Yes, the probability of a recession has increased, but it’s not flashing a warning light.”

It’s a message investors seem willing to accept, at least for now, and at least for as long as Trump limits his tweet tirades, amid the best two weeks of the quarter in the S&P 500. Credit the Powell Put or the fool-me-once effect, but they’re acting a little less panicked while staring into a familiar abyss. Markets gyrate, but so far every dip has been met with buyers.

Speaking in Zurich Friday, Powell said the most likely outlook for the U.S. and world economy is continued moderate growth, but the central bank was monitoring significant risks.

“We’re going to continue to watch all of these factors, and all the geopolitical things that are happening, and we’re going to continue to act as appropriate to sustain this expansion,” the chairman said. “Our main expectation is not at all that there will be a recession.”

A variety of things feed the case for a downturn, with most of the attention focused on the U.S.-China trade dispute, contractions in global manufacturing and the signal from bond markets.

On Tuesday, a key U.S. factory gauge, the Institute for Supply Management’s purchasing manager’s index, unexpectedly contracted for the first time since 2016. In the Treasury market, yields sit at half their level of a year ago and short-term rates have intermittently risen above longer ones, an inversion with a good record of signaling recessions.

At the same time, easing credit conditions, a strong consumer and unemployment near 50-year low paint a brighter picture that has lifted stocks. Data Thursday showed the services sector is expanding, hiring continues apace and durable goods are being bought. Friday’s employment report trailed forecasts in terms of jobs added but did little to suggest a recession is at hand.

“If you take a step back, you see that the economy isn’t in a terrible shape, just like a year ago,” said Candice Bangsund, portfolio manager at Fiera Capital. “What’s clear is that the central bank isn’t going anywhere and it’s going to backstop the economy.”

After gaining 1.9%, the S&P 500 ended the week roughly one big rally away from its July record of 3,025.86. The index has clocked 12 records in 2019. By this time last year it had closed at 19. While the market’s record of buoyancy is intact, predictions that the country and world are poised for big economic trouble have only gotten louder.

Ray Dalio, the billionaire founder of Bridgewater Associates, said there’s about a 25% chance of a U.S. recession this year and in 2020 and that central bankers will be limited in addressing it. DoubleLine Capital’s Jeffrey Gundlach forecasts a 40%-45% chance of recession in the next six months and 65% in the next year.

Standing against those views are the actions of the Fed, whose willingness to pump stimulus has helped push the S&P 500 up 19% in 2019. Policy makers cut rates in July for the first time in more than a decade and investors are all but certain another cut is coming this month. Traders are betting the central bank will cut rates by 50 basis points by the end of the year, with a 44% chance of an additional quarter-point cut.

“The biggest difference is the Fed,” said Arthur Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities Corp. “As an operating body, they have changed the tone in the way they look at the world.”

–With assistance from Emily Barrett.

To contact the reporters on this story: Elena Popina in New York at epopina@bloomberg.net;Vildana Hajric in New York at vhajric1@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Jeremy Herron at jherron8@bloomberg.net, Chris Nagi

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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Ray Dalio breaks down why he see a 25% chance of recession through 2020

Dalio – who founded Bridgewater Associates, the world’s largest hedge fund – listed four separate factors that he believes will affect the severity of the …

Getty Images / Roy Rochlin

  • Billionaire Ray Dalio – the founder of Bridgewater Associates, the world‘s largest hedge fund – he sees a 25% chance of recession in 2019 and through 2020.
  • He cited the effectiveness of central bank policies, the wealth gap, the 2020 US elections, and the economic emergence of China as key factors in deciding the intensity of the next economic downturn.
  • The Bridgewater founder also warned the Fed should slowly cut rates by small increments.
  • .

Ray Dalio he sees a 25% chance of economic recession in the rest of the year and through 2020, and that central banks can only do so much to avert it.

Dalio – who founded Bridgewater Associates, the world‘s largest hedge fund – listed four separate factors that he believes will affect the severity of the next economic downturn. The combined variables are “unique” and haven‘t existed since the 1930s, Dalio said on “The David Rubenstein Show.”

The factors are:

  • Effectiveness of central bank policies
  • The wealth gap, which will affect how the next recession will look “socially, politically, and so on”
  • The 2020 elections, which he called “an issue between capitalists and socialists, or the rich and the poor”
  • The emergence of China in relation to the US

The billionaire added that central banks around the world “have to face the fact that when the next downturn comes there will not be the power to reverse it in the same way” they recovered from the 2008 financial crisis. He recommended the Fed cut interest rates slowly and by small increments instead of rushing to invigorate the US economy.

for the first time since the financial crisis on July 31, with Fed chair Jerome Powell calling the move a “mid-cycle adjustment.”

Though President Trump has repeatedly pushed for large rate cuts, he‘s by the Federal Open Market Committee‘s September 18 meeting. The national economy is “relatively strong,” and rapidly cutting the interest rate could be costly in the future, Boston Fed president Eric Rosengren Tuesday.

“You don‘t want to apply accommodation at a time when you don‘t need it, in part because you won‘t have it when you do need it and in part because there are side effects from pushing interest rates very low. It encourages people to take more risk,” Rosengren said.

Bridgewater‘s main hedge fund – Pure Alpha – as of August 23, despite other macro-focused funds rising through 2019. Bridgewater is the world‘s largest hedge fund, with about $160 billion in managed assets.

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Ray Dalio sees a 25% chance of recession through 2020 and recommends the Fed cut interest …

Billionaire Ray Dalio the founder of Bridgewater Associates, the world’s largest hedge fund told Bloomberg he sees a 25% chance of recession in …
  • He cited the effectiveness of central bank policies, the wealth gap, the 2020 US elections, and the economic emergence of China as key factors in deciding the intensity of the next economic downturn.
  • The Bridgewater founder also warned the Fed should slowly cut rates by small increments.
  • Visit the Markets Insider homepage for more stories .

Ray Dalio told Bloomberg he sees a 25% chance of economic recession in the rest of the year and through 2020, and that central banks can only do so much to avert it.

Dalio who founded Bridgewater Associates, the world’s largest hedge fund listed four separate factors that he believes will affect the severity of the next economic downturn. The combined variables are “unique” and haven’t existed since the 1930s, Dalio said on “The David Rubenstein Show.”

The factors are:

  • Effectiveness of central bank policies
  • The wealth gap, which will affect how the next recession will look “socially, politically, and so on”
  • The 2020 elections, which he called “an issue between capitalists and socialists, or the rich and the poor”
  • The emergence of China in relation to the US

The billionaire added that central banks around the world “have to face the fact that when the next downturn comes there will not be the power to reverse it in the same way” they recovered from the 2008 financial crisis. He recommended the Fed cut interest rates slowly and by small increments instead of rushing to invigorate the US economy.

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The Fed cut interest rates for the first time since the financial crisis on July 31, with Fed chair Jerome Powell calling the move a “mid-cycle adjustment.”

Though President Trump has repeatedly pushed for large rate cuts, he’s likely to be disappointed by the Federal Open Market Committee’s September 18 meeting. The national economy is “relatively strong,” and rapidly cutting the interest rate could be costly in the future, Boston Fed president Eric Rosengren told the Washington Post Tuesday.

“You don’t want to apply accommodation at a time when you don’t need it, in part because you won’t have it when you do need it and in part because there are side effects from pushing interest rates very low. It encourages people to take more risk,” Rosengren said.

Bridgewater’s main hedge fund Pure Alpha is reportedly down about 6% as of August 23, despite other macro-focused funds rising through 2019. Bridgewater is the world’s largest hedge fund, with about $160 billion in managed assets.

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Wall St set to open higher as upbeat Chinese data eases growth worries

Intel Corp, Qualcomm Inc and Micron Technology Inc rose between 1.1% … Shares of American Eagle Outfitters Inc fell 9% after the apparel retailer …

U.S. stocks were set to open higher on Wednesday after encouraging data from China allayed concerns of slowing global growth, with sentiment getting a boost from easing of tensions in Hong Kong following the withdrawal of a controversial bill.

A private survey showed activity in China’s services sector expanded at the fastest pace in three months in August, a boost to the world’s second-largest economy struggling to reverse a prolonged slump in its manufacturing sector.

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam on Wednesday withdrew an extradition bill that had triggered months of often violent protests.

Wall Street’s three major indexes fell on Tuesday after the United States and China imposed new tariffs on each other’s goods over the weekend and on data showing weak U.S. factory activity in August.

“The positive economic news out of China is offsetting the weak manufacturing data from the U.S. yesterday and diminishes the fear of an economic downturn,” said Shawn Gibson, chief investment officer at asset management firm Liquid Strategies.

“Global growth and not just U.S. growth is a very important narrative for investors because a strong Chinese economy is important to our economy as well,” Gibson added.

Markets struggled last month as escalating trade tensions and the inversion of a key part of the U.S. yield curve, often seen as a sign of recession, drove investors away from risky assets and pushed the S&P 500 to log its worst August in four years.

The benchmark is now 4% away from its record high hit in late July.

Intel Corp, Qualcomm Inc and Micron Technology Inc rose between 1.1% and 3% in premarket trading.

Goldman Sachs Group Inc, Bank of America Corp and JPMorgan Chase & Co were also trading higher.

UBS slashed its forecasts for world growth and government bond yields, predicting 10-year U.S. Treasury yields, the benchmark for global borrowing costs, would end the year at just 1%.

Gibson said the nonfarm payrolls report due Friday is anticipated to be the most important jobs data in a while, because any sort of weakness could push Treasury yields even lower and signal that bond investors are concerned about an upcoming recession.

At 8:45 a.m. ET, Dow e-minis were up 229 points, or 0.88%. S&P 500 e-minis were up 26 points, or 0.89% and Nasdaq 100 e-minis were up 78.25 points, or 1.03%.

Among other stocks, Activision Blizzard Inc gained 2.8% after brokerage BMO Capital Markets upgraded the videogame publisher’s stock to “outperform.”

Tyson Foods Inc shares fell 3.7%, after the United States’ biggest meat processor cut its 2019 earnings forecast.

Shares of American Eagle Outfitters Inc fell 9% after the apparel retailer forecast third quarter earnings below estimates.

Data showed the U.S. trade deficit narrowed slightly in July as exports rebounded, but the gap with China surged to a six-month high. (Reporting by Uday Sampath and Shreyashi Sanyal in Bengaluru; Editing by Anil D’Silva)

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