ZigBee

TI is a leading supplier of ZigBee solutions with a dedicated internal software engineering team working on the latest revisions of the ZigBee Pro stack and application profiles. TI offerings include ZigBee modules, RF4CE, ZigBee Wireless solutions, ZigBee networksolutions, ZigBee Chips, and ZigBee …

SimpleLinkTM Zigbee wireless MCUs

A standard for robust, low-power mesh networks in home and building automation

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Samsung announces new 7nm plant, will manufacture Qualcomm’s 5G Snapdragon chipset

Samsung is also in a race against TSMC, which is also attempting to secure a large number of clients with its 7nm chipset manufacturing technology. Rumour has it that Apple’s A12 chipset orders are exclusively going to be given to TSMC, which means that Samsung might have to put in its operational …
Samsung and Qualcomm to push the boundaries of chip manufacturing with 7nm production plantSamsung and Qualcomm to push the boundaries of chip manufacturing with 7nm production plant

Though both the Snapdragon 845 and Exynos 9810 are made on the second-generation 10nm FinFET fabrication process, these chipsets are going to be stepping stones for the next big thing in the mobile hardware segment. Yes, we are talking about the next-generation 7nm process which will be used in manufacturing chipsets for future portable devices like smartphones and tablets.

In the latest announcement, Samsung has said that it is going to be partnering with Qualcomm to push 7nm manufacturing through something called Extreme Ultraviolet Processing (EUV). Qualcomm recently announced the Snapdragon X24 LTE modem and the company is going to be following it up with the release of the Snapdragon X50 modem, which is expected to be the world’s first 5G modem from the manufacturer to be used in smartphones and tablets.

Samsung’s 7nm plant could make Snapdragon 855

Samsung is also in a race against TSMC, which is also attempting to secure a large number of clients with its 7nm chipset manufacturing technology. Rumour has it that Apple’s A12 chipset orders are exclusively going to be given to TSMC, which means that Samsung might have to put in its operational capacity in the top gear if it wants to be at par with the competition. The 7nm fabrication processing that Samsung will oversee will also be used to make the Snapdragon 855 and its Exynos-series equivalent chipset. This hardware is going to be found in the Galaxy X, which is said to feature internals that we can only think about right now.

Compared with its 10nm FinFET predecessors, Samsung’s 7LPP EUV technology not only greatly reduces the process complexity, with fewer process steps and better yield, but it will also allow up to a 40 percent increase in area efficiency with 10 percent higher performance or up to 35 percent lower power consumption. Both the 5G modems and future chipsets will require this level of efficiency to provide more battery life to users in the future. The amount of data throughput that 5G connectivity will be capable of, a more advanced processing technology is going to be necessary to conserve battery life in portable devices.

The first SoC to feature the 7nm architecture is expected to be unveiled during the month of December, following the same timetable as last year.

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Lehigh Hyperloop changes structure, objective and name

In 2017, Lehigh’s Hyperloop club made it to the third phase of the SpaceX Hyperloop competition, which challenges students to design and build a transport pod prototype. Team members submitted a final design package in the fall. Though they soon learned they would not advance to the next round, …

In 2017, Lehigh’s Hyperloop club made it to the third phase of the SpaceX Hyperloop competition, which challenges students to design and build a transport pod prototype.

Team members submitted a final design package in the fall. Though they soon learned they would not advance to the next round, they were not disheartened. Instead, the group used it as an opportunity to switch gears.

Raymond Tetyevsky, ’20, a team captain, said Hyperloop pods need specific high-tech rails and tunnels to function, which club members did not have access to, leaving them unsure of how their pod would perform once installed.

“We’ve decided the best thing is to detach ourselves from (Hyperloop) and move on to bigger and better things,” Tetyevsky said. “Something that will make a difference (at Lehigh).”

Alexander Radetsky, ’20, a team captain, said club members spent the last two years developing hyperloop-related pods. They want their next project to be short-term and relevant — something the team canvisualize and implement in the moment.

That’s when an old prospect became a new goal.

The club’s attention was redirected toward a competition it had discovered in September but set aside during the Hyperloop competition.

HeroX’s “GoFly” challenges competitors to create a personal flying device that achieves vertical takeoff and landing, travels a minimum of 20 nautical miles and can carry one person.

“We’ve always been a transportation-oriented club,” Radetsky said. “GoFly is a competition that targets a different form of transportation: aerospace.”

Tetyevsky said the GoFly competition will last about two to three years. The first of three phases — research, development and design of the product — is due April 18.

Gencer Ates, ’19, a team captain, said the team has met tighter deadlines.

The second phase of the competition involves design implementation and phase three is constructing the craft. Once constructed and tested, the prototype will be brought to the location of the competition, which is still undetermined.

Nithin Rajaram, ’20, the club’s engineering and simulation leader, said there is a $2 million cash grand prize and many smaller cash prizes within the three phases. Goals within these phases include creating the quietest, fastest or most innovative design.

In addition to competition goals, team members have their own objectives.

Radetsky said the team would like the prototype to fit in the back of a pickup truck so it can be transported for testing, which could not be done with the Hyperloop.

Tetyevsky said he wants to promote safety.

Although he is excited for the project, Radetsky said the transition will be difficult. He said the flight dynamics for a craft like this are similar to taking off in a helicopter and switching to an airplane, mid-flight.

GoFly is not the only project the club is working on. Tetyevsky said it is also in the early stages of developing a project for Lehigh’s campus.

“We’re designing a new transportation system for Lehigh,” Tetyevsky said. “Something that’s greener, that would eliminate the diesel buses running up and down the Hill all the time, quieter, because those buses make a lot of noise, something quicker and something safer. On icy mornings, that hill is treacherous.”

The team is hoping to get involvement from railway companies in the Bethlehem area that were active in the past. Radetsky said they want the transportation system to be Lehigh-specific.

“It’s going to be a project designed and implemented by students,” Tetyevsky said. “To us, it is very important to build something that is sustainable for the club and for the other engineers that are coming in as freshmen, something that will be passed on well beyond when we leave.”

Because the team is no longer working on the Hyperloop project, the name of the club will be changed.

“It’s not a niche club, it’s not focused on only one particular thing,” Tetyevsky said. “We’re trying to develop (a name) that incorporates not just what we do, but who are.”

As the team’s objectives change, so will the structure.

Ates said that last year, mainly experienced upperclassmen had active roles in the club because they had the skills to design the Hyperloop. Now, the team is implementing a new system that allows all members to participate on at a more equal level.

Rajaram said older club members are now working to teach new members the skills and techniques they need, rather than taking on all the work themselves.

Hyperloop members come from a variety of engineering and business backgrounds, which allows members to work on multiple projects. The interdisciplinary nature of the team, however, was not always seen as a positive thing.

Radetsky said the divide between the business and engineering students was once clear. Now, IBE students oversee and integrate the two sides.

Ates said that anyone can join the club, regardless of major.

“As to what we can accomplish, we realize — which I think was a fault of the group before the restructure — how much people are capable of until you let them go,” Tetyevsky said. “You tell them less and they’ll give you more.”

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Samsung plans new 7nm plant to better fight TSMC

Samsung’s new foundry will be built in Hwaseong, Gyeonggi Province, and will have the South Korean giant better fighting Taiwanese foundry giant TSMC. Samsung said that they’re going to have a ceremony with around 100 local residents of Hwaseong on Friday to mark the ground breaking of the …

In its chase towards being the best in everything, Samsung will break ground on its new foundry plant that will be making some of the most advanced chips in the world.

samsung-plans-new-7nm-plant-better-fight-tsmc_10

Samsung’s new foundry will be built in Hwaseong, Gyeonggi Province, and will have the South Korean giant better fighting Taiwanese foundry giant TSMC. Samsung said that they’re going to have a ceremony with around 100 local residents of Hwaseong on Friday to mark the ground breaking of the new plant.

Samsung has said: “The new plant is so far planned to be used largely for foundry production, but it can further be expanded for other productions later“.

This new plant will see Samsung filling it with Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography equipment that is sourced from the Netherlands, which is the latest and greatest in nanometer process technologies. With this new EUV gear, Samsung will be capable of mass producing 7nm chips in 2019.

TSMC is the largest foundry chipmaker in the world, with a large 55% of the manufacturing pie. Samsung’s new moves will see them catch up quickly, so the fight from their current position of 7% is going to be hard. Samsung is also teasing its 6nm, 5nm, and 4nm technologies that will see the light of day in 2020 and beyond.

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Telstra details telematics deal with Linfox

Telstra and its connected vehicles subsidiary MTData will roll out a telematics system for Linfox’s truck fleet, based on the telco’s mobile network. Telstra said the telematics and management solution will include installing Samsung tablets in Linfox vehicles. The tables will allow drivers to complete safety …

Telstra and its connected vehicles subsidiary MTData will roll out a telematics system for Linfox’s truck fleet, based on the telco’s mobile network.

Telstra said the telematics and management solution will include installing Samsung tablets in Linfox vehicles. The tables will allow drivers to complete safety checklists and access logbooks. In some vehicles the system will allow road safety incidents to be recorded.

“We are in a critical time in the logistics industry and it’s important to deliver technology that will ensure greater safety for our drivers and the communities in which we operate,” Linfox CIO Conrad Harvey said in a statement.

“Heavy vehicle safety is a key issue within our industry and community and by partnering with Telstra to implement transformative technologies that allow us to better monitor and measure safety compliance throughout our fleet, we can work to reduce risk factors and enhance safe driver behaviour.”

Telstra in November announced it had acquired MTData. The telco said the acquisition would “fast track” its enterprise connected vehicle services as part of its Internet of Things (IoT) portfolio.

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