Delaware council hears pitch on renewable-electricity aggregation

Delaware council hears pitch on renewable-electricity aggregation … to use electricity provided by solar panels and wind turbines in Ohio to create what … The average difference in price per kWh between brown and green energy …

Delaware city voters could see a ballot issue in 2021 seeking approval of a citywide aggregation plan that could lead to adoption of renewable electric power.

That’s one possible outcome of a proposal described to City Council members Oct. 25 by representatives of Aspen Energy Corp., a Dublin consulting firm.

Delaware City Hall

Alan Samuels and Jay Sell of Aspen described a plan to use electricity provided by solar panels and wind turbines in Ohio to create what Samuels called a “100% local Ohio renewable-electricity-generation program for residents and small-business owners.”

Aspen proposes that Ohio municipalities adopt electricity- and gas-aggregation programs that would allow homeowners and small businesses to opt into renewable “green” energy, replacing “brown” electricity produced by coal-burning plants.

Also under an aggregate plan, consumers could opt into more traditional power and natural-gas options or shop on their own for energy providers, he said.

What has been available thus far in Ohio, Samuels said, are “renewable-energy credits (that have) been around awhile (stemming) from renewable assets in other states,” such as Texas and Oklahoma.

That’s “not a bad program but certainly not the same impact as … renewable-energy assets actually being here in the state of Ohio,” he said.

Samuels said Aspen partners with AEP as part of AEP’s Integrated Renewable Energy program.

In the Nov. 3 election, he said, such aggregation issues were on the ballot in Columbus and Grove City, and both were approved.

Such action is a first step to making renewable options even possible for consideration, he said.

A network of Ohio-based solar panels and wind turbines does not yet exist, Sell said.

“Most of the assets are going to come online in 2023, but some of them are going to be feathered in in 2022,” Chris Bailey of AEP told council. “It does take some time, about a year and a half to two years, to get these things built to what Jay and Alan said.”