Elon Musk is wrong on robotaxi timing, Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi says

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi told CNBC he agrees with Tesla CEO Elon Musk that the future of mobility is electric, but he disagrees with Musk that …

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi told CNBC he agrees with Tesla CEO Elon Musk that the future of mobility is electric, but he disagrees with Musk that truly autonomous “robotaxis” will debut next year.

In an interview that aired on Uber’s IPO day on Friday, “Squawk Box” co-host Andrew Ross Sorkin asked him what the future of mobility looks like.

“First of all, it’s got to be electric,” the CEO said. “We think that’s a no-brainer. It’s good for the environment. It’s where the world is going. And we’re playing our part, for example, in London to move it electric.” He added that Uber, of course, thinks the future of mobility also has to be “shared.”

The ride-hailing giant will make its debut on the New York Stock Exchange on Friday, pricing its IPO on Thursday night at $45 per share.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk recently told investors he is ready to take Tesla into a new, driverless era. The company should have a million vehicles capable of functioning as driverless robotaxis on the road by the end of 2020, he said. He also told investors that self-driving technology and services will help his electric car company grow to a $500 billion market cap.

When the Uber CEO first heard Musk’s predictions about this, Khosrowshahi said, “I thought: If he can do it, more power to him. Our approach is a more conservative approach as far as sensor technology and mapping technology. The software’s going to get there. So I don’t think that his vision is by any means wrong. I just think we disagree on timing.”

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Nasa, SpaceX, Blue Origin and Virgin Galactic – who will put humans back on the Moon first?

Nasa is lining up against Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic, Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Bezos’ Blue Origin in a who-can-flash-the-most-cash battle of …

WITH Amazon boss Jeff Bezos promising this week to land humans on the Moon by 2024, the all-new space race is gathering pace.

Nasa is lining up against Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic, Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Bezos’ Blue Origin in a who-can-flash-the-most-cash battle of the billionaires.

 Jeff Bezos has unveiled the lunar lander he hopes will take people to the moon within five years

AFP or licensors
Jeff Bezos has unveiled the lunar lander he hopes will take people to the moon within five years

Each is fighting to build a rocket that can take people to space on the cheap – and almost all of them are gunning for the Moon.

Whoever gets there first will make an inordinate amount of cash via exclusive deals with global space agencies.

They’ll carry cargo and astronauts to Earth’s rocky neighbour for sums in the hundreds of millions of dollars and stake a claim as the world’s pioneering space experts.

Humans haven’t set foot on the moon since 1972. We’ve summed up who’s taking us back – and when – below.

Amazon’s Jeff Bezos unveils Blue Origin’s lunar lander called Blue Moon

Blue Origin

Blue Origin is a private space firm based in Seattle, USA.

It’s run and funded by Amazon boss Jeff Bezos – the world’s richest man.

Like bitter rival SpaceX, Blue Origin is aiming to make space travel cheaper via reusable rockets.

So far, its work has mostly focussed on brief space flights for tourists, but the firm recently announced intentions to go to the moon.

On Thursday, Bezos unveiled a new lunar lander built by Blue Origin that he hopes will take people to the moon by 2024.

He wants to land a robotic ship the size of a small house dubbed Blue Moon on the rock using a brand new rocket engine.

Bezos hopes to help Nasa build a permanent moon base. He said: “It’s time to go back to the moon. This time to stay.”

 Outside of its moon ambitions, Blue Origin wants to begin sending paying tourists on short space flights. Pictured is a test of one of its New Shepherd rockets, which will carry out its first manned test launch later this year

Reuters
Outside of its moon ambitions, Blue Origin wants to begin sending paying tourists on short space flights. Pictured is a test of one of its New Shepherd rockets, which will carry out its first manned test launch later this year
 British billionaire Sir Richard Branson

AFP or licensors
British billionaire Sir Richard Branson

Virgin Galactic

Virgin Galactic has not announced any goals to reach the moon, instead sticking to tourist flights to the edge of space.

It’s run by British billionaire Richard Branson, who founded the firm in 2004.

Virgin Galactic sent its first manned flight to space last year – the first private space firm to do so.

Its rocket/plane hybrid SpaceShipTwo Unity soared 50 miles above Earth in December ahead of the company’s first commercial spaceflights for private passengers later this year.

 Virgin Galactic will use a rocket/plane hybrid to fly tourists to the edge of space

PA:Press Association
Virgin Galactic will use a rocket/plane hybrid to fly tourists to the edge of space

AP:Associated Press

SpaceX is run by Tesla boss Elon Musk

SpaceX

Run by eccentric billionaire Elon Musk, SpaceX is seen by many as the front runner in the new space race.

It regularly launches its reusable Falcon 9 rockets on missions for agencies like Nasa and the US National Security Agency.

SpaceX’s main goal is launching satellites and eventually astronauts for these high-paying punters.

But it also has ambitions to travel further using a new long-distance rocket currently in development, dubbed Starship.

If all goes according to plan, Starship will launch a Japanese billionaire on a round-the-moon mission in 2023.

SpaceX has no public ambitions to actually land people on the moon. Its grand plan involves settling other worlds such as Mars.

Musk has repeatedly said the goal of SpaceX is to help humanity become a “multi-planet species”.

 SpaceX plans to use a new rocket dubbed Starship to carry people to the Moon and beyond

Social Media – Refer to Source
SpaceX plans to use a new rocket dubbed Starship to carry people to the Moon and beyond
 Nasa boss Jim Bridenstine

EPA
Nasa boss Jim Bridenstine

Nasa

Nasa wants to build a “lunar gateway” in orbit around the Moon, a mini version of the International Space Station.

Its current ambitions are to have the manned Moon base in place by 2028.

Nasa boss Jim Bridenstine said in March: “We will go to the Moon in the next decade with innovative, new technologies and systems to explore more locations across the lunar surface than ever before.

“This time, when we go to the Moon, we will stay.”

 Artist's impression of Nasa's Lunar Gateway orbiting base

Nasa
Artist’s impression of Nasa’s Lunar Gateway orbiting base

The plan, which has been in development for a few years, relies on a lunar outpost that Nasa calls Gateway.

This is a permanent space station that orbits the Moon and houses astronauts, laboratory experiments and more.

Once finished, astronauts and robot probes will fly down to the lunar surface to conduct experiments.

Construction on Gateway is expected to begin as soon as 2022, and Nasa plans to complete the base within the next 10 years.

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Nasa revealed plans for a permanent moon base last year, with boss Jim Bridenstine declaring “we want lots of humans in space”.

It recently picked Blue Origin rival SpaceX to front a world-first mission to deflect a hazardous space rock by crashing a spaceship into it in 2022.

And here are the space mysteries that Nasa simply can’t explain.

Are you excited about next week’s Blue Origin announcement? Let us know in the comments!


We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.


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Musk Vandalizes Sex Scandal Space Bro Bezos’ Mooncraft ‘Blue Balls’

By CCN: Elon Musk has just proved to Jeff Bezos that being the world’s richest man doesn’t offer immunity against below-the-belt jokes. This was …

By CCN: Elon Musk has just proved to Jeff Bezos that being the world’s richest man doesn’t offer immunity against below-the-belt jokes. This was demonstrated on Twitter after the Amazon founder and CEO, as well as the founder of space firm Blue Origins, launched a mock-up of a new mooncraft designed to ferry humans and equipment to the lunar surface by 2024.

In the tweet, Musk demonstrated that while the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission recently limited what he can communicate on social media, it certainly hasn’t castrated his ability to tell lewd jokes.

Multitalented Elon Musk Has Sketchy Photoshopping Skills

In the tweet fired off on Thursday evening, the Tesla boss as well as CEO of space exploration firm SpaceX edited an image on the Blue Origins’ mooncraft known as Blue Moon effectively changing the name to Blue Balls. To cap it off, Musk advised Bezos to ‘stop teasing’.

Elon Musk, Jeff BezosElon Musk, Jeff Bezos

Elon Musk calls Jeff Bezos’ spacecraft ‘Blue Balls’ | Source: Twitter

Bezos was recently embroiled in a sex scandal. This was after an extra-marital affair with a TV star was reported by the National Enquirer. There were various twists and turns as the scandal unraveled including the tabloid’s failed attempt to publish nudes of Bezos. The Amazon CEO and his wife of 24 years are currently in the process of divorce.

Musk Taking Shots at Bezos? This Is Not Virgin Territory

This is not the first time that Musk is taking shots at Bezos. Early last month Musk branded Bezos a ‘copycat’ on Twitter. This was after Amazon announced it was sending satellites into low earth orbit to provide broadband to underserved areas. Fourteen months earlier, SpaceX had launched its own version of internet satellites via its Falcon 9 rocket.

.@JeffBezos copy 🐈

— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) April 9, 2019

Though SpaceX has dominated the public eye for the past two decades, Blue Origins is nearly two years older. SpaceX was started on May 6, 2002 while Blue Origins was founded on September 8, 2000.

Bad Bile or Just Regular Tech Bro Rivalry?

Musk has also at times tried to play the contempt card whenever the topic of Bezos is brought up. In October 2017 during a BBC interview, Musk didn’t sound too thrilled to be told he was competing with Bezos. When told ‘you are competing with the likes of Jeff Bezos’ in the space sector, Musk retorted ‘Jeff Who?’

Elon Musk – Not Your Regular Detroit Car CEO

As an entrepreneur and business head, Musk has regularly demonstrated he doesn’t take himself too seriously. A case in point is farting sounds software update that Tesla rolled out late last year. It would be inconceivable to imagine traditional carmaker CEO in Detroit spending company resources on such a feature and going on to publicize it.

To air is human https://t.co/bnDdnw2ydT

— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) February 12, 2019

The farting sounds had all the hallmarks of Musk’s in-jokes as their names betrayed. One of the names given to the fart sounds include Short Shorts Ripper. This was possibly in reference to Tesla short sellers, a group Elon Musk has declared an aversion for.

Other farting sounds were named after companies Musk has founded or products unveiled by his startups. This includes the Boring Fart (a reference to The Boring Company), Neurastink (in honor of neurotechnology company Neuralink). The Falcon Heavy farting sound is obviously in honor of SpaceX’s Falcon rockets.

The fart noises in the Tesla cars, however, do not produce a smell. Yet. But Jeff Bezos is definitely feeling the stink with the latest Musk burn.

Elon Musk SLAMMED for response to ‘dangerous’ video of couple having sex in Tesla

Elon Musk SLAMMED for response to ‘dangerous’ video of couple having sex in … However, it seems that despite this, the firm’s CEO, Elon Musk , was …

Last week, a raunchy video was uploaded to PornHub , showing a couple having sex in a moving Tesla car while it was on Autopilot mode.

The video is of pornstar Taylor Jackson and her boyfriend, and has already garnered over 2 million views on the porn site.

Tesla explicitly states that Autopilot mode ‘does not make the vehicle autonomous’, and that drivers should keep two hands on the wheel at all times.

However, it seems that despite this, the firm’s CEO, Elon Musk , was unfazed by the video.

Musk took to Twitter to respond to the clip, and was very blasé about the footage.

He wrote: “Turns out there’s more ways to use Autopilot than we imagined. Shoulda seen it coming …”

Unsurprisingly, many Tesla fans are unimpressed by Musk’s response to the video – which could have ended in disaster.

One user replied: “This is dangerous…please all kidding aside, be clear about dangers.”

The Tesla Model S version 7.0 software update containing Autopilot features
The Tesla Model S version 7.0 software update containing Autopilot features (Image: REUTERS/Beck Diefenbach)

Another added: “There was a story where a driver using ‘auto pilot’ decided to look down to text.

“Guess what happened next? Yup – she KILLED someone.”

This isn’t the first time that a video of someone in a dangerous situation in a Tesla has hit the headlines.

This year alone, several videos have been posted of drivers asleep at the wheel of their Tesla car while it’s in Autopilot mode.

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Rocket Report: NASA considers Falcon 9 triple header, Indiana pol eyes Moon

SpaceX to launch dozens of Starlink satellites. SpaceX’s first launch to carry a large number of Starlink broadband Internet satellites is scheduled for …
A Falcon 9 rocket launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base.
Enlarge/ A Falcon 9 rocket launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base.

Welcome to Edition 1.48 of the Rocket Report! Mostly good news this week, with launch-related successes in Japan, the United States, and New Zealand. We also have an interesting article written by a friend of Vice President Mike Pence, who says NASA should use Falcon Heavy rockets for the lunar return.

As always, we welcome reader submissions, and if you don’t want to miss an issue, please subscribe using the box below (the form will not appear on AMP-enabled versions of the site). Each report will include information on small-, medium-, and heavy-lift rockets as well as a quick look ahead at the next three launches on the calendar.

Japanese start-up launches suborbital rocket. Interstellar Technologies launched its suborbital Momo-3 booster to an altitude of 114km on Saturday, The Japan Times reports. The booster fell into the Pacific Ocean 10 minutes after the launch. “It was a complete success. We’ll work to achieve stable launches and mass-produce (rockets) in quick cycles,” company founder Takafumi Horie told the publication.

A small team … This was the company’s third launch attempt after previous failures in 2017 and 2018. Interstellar aspires to develop a low-cost rocket to launch commercial satellites into space and, according to one source, has just 22 employees. A company must have no small amount of dedication to reach space with such a small core group, and we’re eager to see what comes next after its initial taste of success.

Rocket Lab flies sixth mission. On Sunday, an Electron launch rocket successfully launched the STP-27RD mission. The payload entailed three research and development satellites for the US Department of Defense Space Test Program that will demonstrate advanced space technologies, including a satellite to evaluate new ways of tracking space debris. The company has now deployed 28 satellites to date.

Rolling along now … “It’s a testament to our team and mission partners that Electron has placed another three satellites in orbit, just weeks after our flawless mission for DARPA,” said Rocket Lab Founder and CEO Peter Beck. It’s true. The company is on a roll, and aims to launch every two weeks by the end of the year. (We wouldn’t bet against that). Rocket Lab’s first launch from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia could also come before the end of 2019. (submitted by Ken the Bin)

Relativity signs rideshare deal with Spaceflight. The rocket company Relativity announced Monday that it has signed an agreement with Spaceflight for a series of smallsat rideshare launches, beginning as early as the third quarter of 2021. The option includes an unspecified number of additional launches of Relativity’s Terran 1 rocket, SpaceNews reports.

A better number … Spaceflight officials said the ability to launch 15 or 20 customers on a Terran 1 rocket was about the right number, as it found the greater number of satellites on a Falcon 9 rocket launch in 2018 to be somewhat difficult to manage. “Getting a smaller number of payloads makes sense because you don’t have as much churn,” Spaceflight CEO Curt Blake told the publication. “If you’re talking 15 customers, 20 customers, that’s a lot easier.” (submitted by Ken the Bin)

Another Chinese company will try for orbit. After failed attempts last October (by LandSpace) and this March (by OneSpace), yet another Chinese company will seek to become the first one to put a satellite into orbit. The Beijing-based iSpace will attempt a June launch of an unnamed payload using its Hyperbola-1, four-stage rocket from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, SpaceNews reports.

Bigger rocket coming … iSpace is one of the more prominent of the Chinese launch firms on the country’s startup scene, having secured more than $100 million in series A funding from Matrix Partners China, CDH Investments, tech giant Baidu, and others. Its larger rocket, the Hyperbola-2 booster, is expected to be capable of lifting 1,900 kg to LEO and will make its first flight after 2020, the company said. (submitted by Ken the Bin)

SpaceX to launch dozens of Starlink satellites. SpaceX’s first launch to carry a large number of Starlink broadband Internet satellites is scheduled for May 15, according to the company’s president, Gwynne Shotwell. This launch will carry “dozens of satellites,” adding more prototypes to the two currently in low Earth orbit, SpaceNews reports.

More launches coming … “This next batch of satellites will really be a demonstration set for us to see the deployment scheme and start putting our network together,” Shotwell said at the Satellite 2019 conference. “We start launching satellites for actual service later this year.” After the May launch, SpaceX anticipates launching two to six more times for its Starlink broadband constellation. When those launches occur will depend upon the performance of the first batch of satellites in orbit. (submitted by Unrulycow and Ken the Bin)

Production of Ariane 6 rockets begins. Arianespace said this week that it has signed an order with Ariane Group to begin manufacturing 14 Ariane 6 rockets, the first such batch that will be mass produced. These rockets, which will be flown between 2021 and 2023, will be built with contributions from 13 different European countries.

Final Ariane 5 rockets coming … Arianespace continues to work toward a 2020 launch date for the first flight of the Ariane 6 rocket, which seeks to provide a similar service as the Ariane 5 booster at a lower cost. Speaking of that venerable rocket, Arianespace said it will also produce a final batch of eight Ariane 5 rockets, which will be phased out as the Ariane 6 proves itself. (submitted by Ken the Bin and CK)

NASA considering using same Falcon 9 three times. Early Friday morning, SpaceX scrubbed the launch of a supply mission to the International Space Station. The stated reason was not a problem with the rocket but with the recovery drone ship. After the fact, NASA’s Kenny Todd said the agency was OK with the delay because of a back-up launch window the next day.

Agency wanted that rocket back … “In the end, SpaceX had to make the call,” Todd said. “But I think one of our senior engineers who’s watched an incredible number of these missions said, ‘You know, sometimes the universe is talking to you, and sometimes you need to listen to it.’ And the reality is, when we went through all of that yesterday it seemed like the universe was talking to us. So in the end, I thought it was an OK trade.” NASA also had a vested interest, as it planned to use this rocket for the next ISS supply mission (CRS-18) and possibly CRS-19 as well, Todd said. This would be the first time NASA has agreed to use the same Falcon 9 three times.

SpaceX getting better at stowing Falcon 9 legs. In the past, it has taken as much as several days for SpaceX employees to retract the landing legs on its Block 5 variant of the Falcon 9 booster. But as Teslarati reports, after the CRS-17 resupply mission to the International Space Station launched on Saturday, the company was able to retract the four legs in a matter of an hour or two after a droneship brought the rocket into port.

These details matter … As the publication notes, this was not so much an issue of cost, but time. The original retraction method added days to the time needed to turn around a Falcon 9 rocket for another flight. If the company is to ever reach Elon Musk’s goal of re-flying a Falcon 9 rocket within 24 hours, details like this matter. So it’s nice to see that SpaceX continues to strive to work through every issue confronting rapid reusability. (submitted by Max Q and Ken the Bin)

Air Force solicits bids for mid-2020 launches. After considerable public debate, the US Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center has released the final solicitation for companies to bid on launch contracts for the period of 2022-2026. Proposals are due August 1, and the Air Force intends to select just two companies, SpaceNews reports. “We must move forward now. We are answering Congress’ 2014 directive to transition off the Russian-made RD-180 rocket engine,” Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson said in a statement. “The industrial base is ready.”

An ongoing battle … The field of competitors is expected to include current national security launch providers United Launch Alliance and SpaceX, as well as new entrants Blue Origin and Northrop Grumman. In recent months, each of these companies has waged, to a greater or lesser extent, a public relations and lobbying battle to better position itself in the competition, which will be critical for each of their business models during the coming decade. The battle is likely to continue as the US Congress sets the fiscal year 2020 budget for the Air Force in the coming months.

Moon can be reached on the cheap, Indiana pol says. Todd Rokita is a former four-term Congressman from Indiana and friend of Vice President Mike Pence. Because the vice president wants to land humans on the Moon by 2024, we were taken aback when Rokita co-authored a surprisingly radical article in The Space Review titled “Going to the Moon within five years and on the cheap: yes, it is possible.”

Doubling down on reusability … What allows the Moon program to be done at a lower cost? Rokita writes: “It’s the new availability of reusable rockets costing about five times less, like the whole world witnessed again on April 11 with the successful return of the three Falcon Heavy booster cores. This technology will allow for payloads not before even considered due to their very high costs. It has revolutionized our ability to go to Moon, Mars, and beyond.” It is not clear whether Rokita is trying to send a message to Pence or if Pence is trying to send a message to industry through the former congressman. We’re intrigued, regardless. (submitted by DR)

Next three launches

May 16: Falcon 9 | Starlink mission | Cape Canaveral, Fla. | 02:30 UTC

May 21: Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle | RISAT-2B | Sriharikota, India | 23:30 UTC

May 27: Soyuz 2.1b | Glonass-M navigation satellite | Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia | TBD

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