Elon Musk hits back at Australian government’s scare campaign on electric cars – telling us to look …

Tesla’s founder Elon Musk decided to involve himself in the Twitter backlash about electric car policy in Australia. Musk said Labor’s plan for 50% of …
Getty ImagesTesla CEO Elon Musk.

Tesla’s founder Elon Musk decided to involve himself in the Twitter backlash about electric car policy in Australia.

Musk said Labor’s plan for 50% of new vehicle sales to be electric by 2030 is actually behind the times. It’s a slap in the face to Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s attack on the Labor Party.

Norway has already proven it could be done last month. No question Australia could do this in far fewer than 11 years.

— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) April 10, 2019

Musk’s tweet comes after Mike Cannon-Brookes, billionaire co-founder of enterprise software company Atlassian, took to Twitter to condemn the Liberal government’s lack of support for electric vehicles.

I’m pretty sure Elon wouldn’t think 50% of new vehicles sold being electric in 11 years is in any way “ambitious”. As for our prime minister’s comments that EVs will “end the weekend” for consumers? Batshit insane! @elonmusk ? ????????‍♂️

— Mike Cannon-Brookes (@mcannonbrookes) April 9, 2019

Labor has said it is possible, without taxing large vehicles such as 4WDs and utes, to have 50% of vehicles electric by 2030 and Musk agreed, saying it’s an easy task that can be achieved in less than the proposed 11 years. He referred to Norway’s success with electric vehicles. In the first two months of 2019, passenger vehicle sales in Norway hit a 50 per cent rate for EVs.

In the lead up to the election announcement on Thursday, the political fight over electric vehicles heated up. Members of the Coalition government have publicly attacked Labor’s electric vehicle plan, with the prime minister suggesting Labor was instead planning to “tax your ute”.

Out and about in Central Coast NSW talking with tradies this morning – Labor need to explain to Australia’s tradies why they want to ban their favourite utes and force them to pay more #saveourtradiesutes

— Michaelia Cash (@SenatorCash) April 8, 2019

The government’s political attacks played into Australia’s love of big vehicles. Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries data shows Australians now buy more SUVs than any other kind of car, with SUVs and light commercial vehicles representing 67.5 per cent of the new car market. Meanwhile, analysis of VFACTS data reported in The Driven found there to be 1352 electric vehicle sales in 2018, excluding Teslas, in Australia’s total car sales of 1,153,111 – about .3 per cent of total sales. The reason Tesla is excluded is that they do not report any sales data.

Experts dismissed the government’s claims, suggesting instead that Labor’s target may go some way to making electric cars more affordable and improve vehicle emissions.

Australia is uniquely placed to benefit from the rise of electric vehicles, with Western Australia tipped to produce more than half the world’s lithium supply.

Lithium is a key ingredient in producing modern batteries used in electric vehicles.

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SpaceX delays mega rocket launch due to high wind shear

But SpaceX chief Elon Musk said upper-level wind shear was extremely high. SpaceX will try again Thursday evening. It will be just the second time a …
ByMarcia Dunn | AP

April 10 at 8:23 PM

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — SpaceX has delayed the launch of its newest mega rocket because of dangerously high wind.

The Falcon Heavy was poised to blast off from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Wednesday night with a communication satellite. But SpaceX chief Elon Musk said upper-level wind shear was extremely high.

SpaceX will try again Thursday evening. It will be just the second time a Falcon Heavy soars. Last year’s test flight put a sports car — Musk’s own Tesla convertible — into space. It’s almost certainly still in orbit around the sun with a mannequin at the wheel.

The Falcon Heavy is the most powerful rocket in use today. SpaceX will try to land two of the first-stage boosters back at Cape Canaveral and the core booster on an ocean platform.

Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Is a Judge’s Request for “Reasonableness” a Win for Elon Musk?

Chris Hill: This week, a federal judge gave Elon Musk and the SEC two weeks to settle the dispute about whether Musk violated the settlement he had …

In October, in the wake of a particularly ill-considered “funding secured” tweet regarding the possibility of taking his company private, the CEO of Tesla (NASDAQ:TSLA), Elon Musk, cut a deal with the Securities and Exchange Commission that cost him some money, a soupçon of unfettered power, and — perhaps most painful — the right to be completely unfiltered and unsupervised in his social media postings. Since then, it has become clear that the billionaire remains determined to live on the edge when it comes to the tweeting part of that agreement, and the SEC asked a judge to hold him in contempt. Late last week, the judge essentially told them all to play nice, and figure it out like adults.

In this segment of the Motley Fool Money podcast, host Chris Hill and Fool senior analysts Andy Cross and Jason Moser consider what that agreement might look like, and discuss how Tesla — the stock and the company — will weather the next downturn, whether Musk can (or should) give up “poking the bear,” and the automaker’s path to profitability.

To catch full episodes of all the Motley Fool’s free podcasts, check out our podcast center. A full transcript follows the video.

This video was recorded on April 5, 2019.

Chris Hill: This week, a federal judge gave Elon Musk and the SEC two weeks to settle the dispute about whether Musk violated the settlement he had agreed to back in October. Judge Alison Nathan told both sides to “take a deep breath and put on their reasonableness pants.” I’m unfamiliar with these pants, but I like the approach that the judge is taking here.

Jason Moser: I feel like I’m going to take that home and use it on my kids once or twice in the coming week. Listen, this is such a battleground stock. I really do feel sorry for anyone who is exceptionally over-weight in this company. It’s got to be tough to sleep at night if you are. Probably the worst thing about this is that I’m not surprised at all. [laughs] I think that the trouble with being a publicly traded company is that Tesla the business is going to be held to these arbitrary benchmarks on a quarterly basis when it comes to producing cars. What we’re finding now, and I’m sure what Elon Musk has known for a while, is that it’s very difficult to make and sell cars.

I think the bigger question for Tesla, for me — I think they’ve clearly established themselves as a viable competitor in the space. But you look at the business itself, it’s anything but simple, the capital structure. I start thinking ahead to when the next recession hits — we know that’s when, not if — what happens to this stock when that next recession hits? Because I think the space is only going to get more and more difficult now, more and more competitive. From a management perspective, it’s probably better if Musk quits poking the bear and just focused on actually running the company. But clearly, he likes stirring up trouble. I don’t know that you’re going to be able to get away from that.

Andy Cross: Poking the bear, you’re talking about the SEC. Let’s just talk about the quarter. They delivered 63,000 vehicles. That’s down 31% from the fourth quarter, which was a record. The Model 3, which is really what they’re banking on being the mass-market vehicle for consumers, deliveries there were down 20%. So, what I’m looking forward to is understanding how the Model 3 will be from a profitability perspective. As they lower that price to drive up demand, will that be profitable enough to continue to drive Tesla toward some kind of profitability that investors are ultimately going to want?

Hill: If you’re a shareholder, do you want Elon Musk being reasonable? I don’t think he got to where he is at this point in his life by being reasonable.

Moser: I don’t think, as a shareholder, I want to have to deal with this narrative regarding the investment. I would rather see him just keep his head down and just keep doing what he does best.

Going back to some of those numbers, it is important to note that while those numbers came in shy for quarter one, there was some pull-forward of demand from quarter one into quarter four of last year because of a step-down in the federal tax credit. And that’s important to note, because that goes to that pricing power thing. We’ve always questioned Tesla’s ability to raise prices. Really, there are a lot of incentives involved in getting people to purchase those cars. Talking about profitability, this is not something where they can just raise prices at the drop of a hat.

Cross: That’s in the U.S. So much the demand is coming from Europe and China, and they had some struggles there from the operations side. To Jason’s point, I think the thing we really want to see with them, and the hope is that Elon Musk will do this, which is drive Tesla from a car manufacturing company, being able to solve these problems so they can get these deliveries set to where they want to be and they can manufacture these companies. Especially when I think about China, which they’re investing a ton of money into that Gigafactory over in China.

Moser: Just to reiterate, they did reaffirm in the release prior guidance of 360,000 to 400,000 vehicle deliveries in 2019. They’re not backing off of that number yet. Granted, it’s still very early on in the year, but it’s worth noting.

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SpaceX delays Falcon Heavy’s historic first commercial launch

On Wednesday Elon Musk, SpaceX CEO suggested that a delay was likely due to “upper atmospheric wind shear” and SpaceX confirmed there would …
falcopunch

No lift off for now.

SpaceX

It seems we’re only getting one incredible space story today.

SpaceX‘s most powerful rocket — the Falcon Heavy — was ready to send Saudi Arabia’s Arabsat-6A telecommunications satellite into orbit Wednesday, but high atmospheric winds have forced SpaceX to postpone the launch by 24 hours.

On Wednesday Elon Musk, SpaceX CEO suggested that a delay was likely due to “upper atmospheric wind shear” and SpaceX confirmed there would be no launch on the day.

Standing down from today’s Falcon Heavy launch attempt; next opportunity is tomorrow, April 11.

— SpaceX (@SpaceX) April 10, 2019

The launch was scheduled for no earlier than 5:32 p.m. PT after the atmospheric conditions pushed the historic flight all the way to the end of its launch window. SpaceX will now use its backup window for launch, which is scheduled to open at 3:32 p.m. PT on April 11 and will remain open until 5:32 p.m. PT.

As with all SpaceX launches, this will be a livestreamed event. It’s a particularly notable one, being Falcon Heavy’s second flight ever and the very first commercial launch for the gargantuan launch vehicle. It’s been over a year since SpaceX sent Elon Musk’sTesla Roadster to space.

SpaceX will have the official livestream on their website, as well as at the YouTube Live link below, 20 minutes before launch:

The rocket’s payload, Arabsat-6A, will be released 34 minutes into the journey. As with the first launch of the Falcon Heavy, SpaceX will try to safely land the two side rocket boosters back at Cape Canaveral Landing Zones 1 and 2 in Florida.

SpaceX will attempt to land Falcon Heavy’s side boosters at Landing Zones 1 and 2 and Falcon Heavy’s center core on the Of Course I Still Love You droneship during the Arabsat-6A mission → https://t.co/gtC39uBC7zpic.twitter.com/0vHnyYt0nN

— SpaceX (@SpaceX) April 9, 2019

The core booster is set to be captured by the Of Course I Still Love You drone ship floating in the Atlantic Ocean. If that occurs, it will be another history-making moment for SpaceX. The first retrieval didn’t go so well for the poor old core booster, which missed the landing and plunged into the ocean.

SpaceX will be hoping for a successful retrieval of all boosters as Falcon Heavy sets its sights on a second launch later this year.

Originally published April 9.

Update, April 10: Adds delay information.

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Watch SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy blast off for its first commercial launch

SpaceX‘s most powerful rocket — the Falcon Heavy — is on the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center, ready to send Saudi Arabia’s Arabsat-6A …
falcopunch

No lift off for now.

SpaceX

It seems we’re only getting one incredible space story today.

SpaceX‘s most powerful rocket — the Falcon Heavy — was ready to send Saudi Arabia’s Arabsat-6A telecommunications satellite into orbit Wednesday, but high atmospheric winds have forced SpaceX to postpone the launch by 24 hours.

On Wednesday Elon Musk, SpaceX CEO suggested that a delay was likely due to “upper atmospheric wind shear” and SpaceX confirmed there would be no launch on the day.

Standing down from today’s Falcon Heavy launch attempt; next opportunity is tomorrow, April 11.

— SpaceX (@SpaceX) April 10, 2019

The launch was scheduled for no earlier than 5:32 p.m. PT after the atmospheric conditions pushed the historic flight all the way to the end of its launch window. SpaceX will now use its backup window for launch, which is scheduled to open at 3:32 p.m. PT on April 11 and will remain open until 5:32 p.m. PT.

As with all SpaceX launches, this will be a livestreamed event. It’s a particularly notable one, being Falcon Heavy’s second flight ever and the very first commercial launch for the gargantuan launch vehicle. It’s been over a year since SpaceX sent Elon Musk’sTesla Roadster to space.

SpaceX will have the official livestream on their website, as well as at the YouTube Live link below, 20 minutes before launch:

The rocket’s payload, Arabsat-6A, will be released 34 minutes into the journey. As with the first launch of the Falcon Heavy, SpaceX will try to safely land the two side rocket boosters back at Cape Canaveral Landing Zones 1 and 2 in Florida.

SpaceX will attempt to land Falcon Heavy’s side boosters at Landing Zones 1 and 2 and Falcon Heavy’s center core on the Of Course I Still Love You droneship during the Arabsat-6A mission → https://t.co/gtC39uBC7zpic.twitter.com/0vHnyYt0nN

— SpaceX (@SpaceX) April 9, 2019

The core booster is set to be captured by the Of Course I Still Love You drone ship floating in the Atlantic Ocean. If that occurs, it will be another history-making moment for SpaceX. The first retrieval didn’t go so well for the poor old core booster, which missed the landing and plunged into the ocean.

SpaceX will be hoping for a successful retrieval of all boosters as Falcon Heavy sets its sights on a second launch later this year.

Originally published April 9.

Update, April 10: Adds delay information.

How to set up Google’s two-step verification: With a few minutes of setup time, your account will be much more secure.

How to book an Uber or Lyft with Google Home: Use a Google Home and your phone to get the best ride.

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