Kaspersky raises alarm over increasing targeted attacks against pharmaceuticals

Global cybersecurity company Kaspersky reveals an alarming trend … In addition, this software has certifications from trusted organizations (for …
Global cybersecurity company Kaspersky reveals an alarming trend observed in the pharmaceutical industry – a year-on-year steady increase on the number of devices being attacked by cybercriminals. From 44% of machines infected in 2017 and a 1% increase in 2018, this year’s number of detected attempts shows that nearly every 5-in-10 devices inside a pharmaceutical facility are now being targeted globally.

Kaspersky raises alarm over increasing targeted attacks against pharmaceuticals
(L-R) Jesmond Chang, Head of Corporate Communications, APAC, Kaspersky; Denis Makrushin, Security Architect at Ingram Micro; Yury Namestnikov, Head of Global Research and Analysis Team (GReAT) Russia at Kaspersky; and Vitaly Kamluk, Director, GReAT APAC, Kaspersky

Amongst the countries which logged the most number of attacks are Pakistan (54%), Egypt (53%), Mexico (47%), Indonesia (46%), and Spain (45%). Four more countries from the Asia Pacific region cap off the top 15 nations with the highest percent of devices infected. These include India, Bangladesh, Hong Kong, and Malaysia with more or less 4-in-10 machines with detected malicious attempts.

“While it is a known fact that money-hungry cybercriminals can easily earn by attacking banks, we also observe that these hackers as well as cyberespionage groups are slowly paying a lot of attention towards the industry of advanced medicine,” says Yury Namestnikov, Head of Global Research and Analysis Team (GReAT) Russia at Kaspersky.

“They are slowly realizing that pharmaceutical companies house a treasure trove of highly valuable data such as the latest drugs and vaccines, the newest researches, as well as medical secrets. The rise of internet-connected operational technology (OT) inside these pharmaceuticals also contributes to the widening attack surface inside this sector,” comments Namestnikov.

Among the Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) groups which have been waging sophisticated spying over pharmaceuticals globally include Cloud Atlas and APT10 also known as MenuPass.

“Based on our monitoring of several APT actors’ movements in the Asia Pacific and globally, we figured that these groups infect servers and exfiltrate data from pharmaceutical companies. Their attack techniques and behaviour also prove that these attackers’ apparent goal is to get their hands on intellectual properties related to the latest medical formulas and research results as well as the business plans of their victims,” adds Namestnikov.

Vulnerabilities in open source EMR-systems and its dangers

In his own research, Denis Makrushin, Security Architect at Ingram Micro, revealed the risks that come along with the steady migration of hospitals from paper-based data storage to electronic medical record (EMR) systems. Makrushin further notes that healthcare organizations, scrambling to digitize their data storage, see open source EMR web-portals as an easy and quick option, despite their known security challenges.

“We are seeing lesser printed or hand-written medical books inside hospitals and clinics worldwide with the advent of open source. Given their limited internal IT workforce, healthcare institutions opt to use convenient services such as OpenEMR, OpenMRS or similar web applications. This technology’s rapid adoption triggers the rise of the threats against this widely-used services,” says Makrushin,

OpenEMR and OpenMRS are open platforms for medical practice management. Any organization can use this product for business without any restrictions. The source code of this product is also available for any developer. In addition, this software has certifications from trusted organizations (for example OpenEMR is ONC Complete Ambulatory HER certified).

“Their free and open nature make these EMR-applications highly sensitive to cyberattacks. There have been a lot of security patches released as researchers unmask one exploit after another. I, myself, have discovered vulnerabilities in these applications, hackers can inject malicious code at the initial stage of registration, and portray himself as a patient. From this, malicious actors can infect the portal’s page and collect medical information from all users of the portal, including doctors and admins. These data can be easily exfiltrated,” he adds.

To securely use this platform, Makrushin suggests healthcare facilities to:

  • Conduct secure software development lifecycle (Secure SDLC)

  • Regularly perform architecture analysis, conduct penetration testing, security code review on systems being used

  • Control the attack surface

  • Try to remove all exposure nodes that process medical data

  • Periodically update your installed software and remove unwanted applications

  • Raise security awareness for every person involved

  • Conduct regular cybersecurity awareness training for all staff and even patients

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Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac: Best Parental Controls

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac costs $39.99 per year for one Mac or $59.99 per year for three, although deep discounts are frequently available.

The Russian-based security firm Kaspersky has a complex reputation, but the company’s Internet Security for Mac program is a solid option for those looking to protect their Apple machines. Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac provides excellent system protection from malware and a handful of useful privacy tools, one of which fills a void left by Apple.

While Kaspersky’s system impact is low, other antivirus products had even lesser impacts for faster overall performance, especially during malware scans. But if parental controls matter to you, Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac is a must-consider option.

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac costs and what’s covered

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac costs $39.99 per year for one Mac or $59.99 per year for three, although deep discounts are frequently available. The program supports Macs running macOS 10.12 Sierra or later, with a minimum of 1.2GB of storage available and 2GB of memory.

Antivirus protection

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac uses traditional, signature-based scanning and behavioral-pattern recognition to detect malware. Threat-related data, including newfound malicious or suspicious files, are processed by the Kaspersky Security Network, a voluntary, cloud-based data-collection network that allows the 400 million computers around the world running Kaspersky software to share malware information.

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac also stops malware made for Windows machines. That may seem odd, but Windows malware can find safe harbor on Macs and spread to other machines on local networks.

Antivirus detection

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac’s malware-scanning engine has a generally perfect record for protecting macOS machines.

It caught 100% of malware in tests conducted by the Austrian lab AV-Comparatives in July 2019, and it also caught 100% of malware in German lab AV-Test study in April and May 2018. In fact, Kaspersky stopped 100% of Mac malware in all tests conducted by either lab since the middle of 2017.

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Of the Mac antivirus programs we’ve recently reviewed, Avast Free Mac Security and Bitdefender Antivirus for Mac also netted perfect scores in both AV-Comparatives’ and AV-Test’s most recent evaluations. Norton 360 Deluxe (which AV-Comparatives didn’t test) earned a 100% score from AV-Test.

Security and privacy features

Kaspersky includes the ability to disable your Mac’s webcam, an option that macOS doesn’t itself offer. You’ll have to reenable it in Kaspersky Internet Security if you want to use your webcam again; there’s no way to grant webcam access to some apps while blocking others.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

There’s also a tool to block tracking by websites, which often track your behavior to serve you ads. Since blocking all trackers could break some websites you use, Kaspersky lets you make distinctions among behavioral trackers and trackers used by ad agencies, web-analytics firms and social networks and treat each category differently, as well as letting you white-list websites of whose trackers you approve.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Kaspersky gives you the option of downloading its password manager, but you get only the free version, which is limited to 15 entries for login credentials and confidential documents. Unlocking unlimited entries costs $14.99 per year, which is rather cheap fora paid password manager.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

You’ll also get client software for Kaspersky’s Secure Connection VPN service, but it limits you to 300MB of traffic per day. For $4.99 per month or $29.99 per year, you can get unlimited VPN service, which also allows you to select the location you connect to. As with the password manager, this is inexpensive foran unlimited VPN service. (Norton 360 Standard and 360 Deluxe each cost more than Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac, but their password manager and VPN services are unlimited by default.)

Performance and system impact

Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac had a mixed impact on our test system’s performance. We tested this by running our custom Excel VLOOKUP benchmark test, which measures how long a computer takes to match 60,000 names and addresses on a spreadsheet. Our test machine wasa 2017 MacBook Air with a 1.8-GHz Intel Core i5 CPU and approximately 54GB of data stored on a 128GB SSD.

With Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac installed on our MacBook, but without any active scans running, the VLOOKUP test finished in an average of 3 minutes and 38 seconds, 2 seconds longer than without any antivirus software installed. That’s a passive hit of just 1%, which is relatively low and not something you’d probably notice in day-to-day activity.

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Other antivirus products’ passive system impacts ranged from 5% to 0%. That’s the great overall news for Mac users: Most of the time, you’ll never notice that you’ve got antivirus software running.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

You would be more likely to notice the slowdowns created by Kaspersky’s active scans. During full-system scans, the VLOOKUP test finished in an average of 5 minutes and 3 seconds, a performance dip of 41%. That’s close to, but not as bad as McAfee AntiVirus Plus‘ 47% fall (the worst score for the round), while Norton (13%) and Sophos Home Premium (7%) caused less of a slowdown during a full scan.

Kaspersky’s biggest system-impact score came from its Quick Scan, wherein the VLOOKUP test finished in 5 minutes and 28 seconds, a hit of 53%. That’s well above the 5% impact from Sophos and the 16% hit from Norton, and it was the highest among all seven programs we recently reviewed.

Kaspersky full-scan completion time of 41 minutes and 20 seconds doesn’t seem to last forever, like Sophos’ 2-hour, 56-minute time does. Instead, Kaspersky’s showing was similar to the completion time posted by Norton (25:49). Those scores were in the middle of the pack and were longer than the supershort 16-second time from Malwarebytes for Mac Premium and the 4:25 from Bitdefender.

Interface

The main window of Kaspersky Internet Security shows your system’s status — Protected, Requires a Restart or otherwise — and presents four clear buttons: Scan, Update, Privacy and Parental Control.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

While I wish Kaspersky’s home screen had a one-click scan button, this layout is clear enough. Once you click Scan on the home screen, you get a window with every kind of scan you could ask for: a field to drag and drop items to be scanned (or browse for them), as well as buttons for full, quick and scheduled scans.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Next up is Updates, which lets you update your system’s antivirus definitions and check the date of the last update and the last scan. This may not need a whole section, but under an > button, you’ll find the helpful Reports menu that contains a ton of detail, with various scan histories.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

The Privacy section places the controls for webcam and website-tracker blocking up top. Underneath, you find links to Kaspersky’s password manager and VPN.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

This may seem like a small detail, but my favorite part of the Kaspersky Internet Security interface is that the company isn’t constantly pushing the upsells for its password manager and VPN solutions at you, or installing them in the menu bar. Others, including Bitdefender and Avast, do this.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

Under Parental Control, Kaspersky has placed a pretty solid set of controls to manage kids’ online experiences. On the left, you get a menu of child profiles, and on the right, you have the account settings, including controls for the pages kids can open, time spent online and the sharing of personal data. (Sophos has offers only parental web filtering.)

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

For a more detailed view of your system’s status, you can click the Open Protection Center button, which will show you five statuses. With these, you can tell if antivirus databases are up to date, if your system is under real-time protection and if your app is activated — the important stuff.

(Image credit: Tom’s Guide)

In the next tab on that screen, you’ll see Recommendations, where Kaspersky urges you to use its browser-based security extensions and sign in to your My Kaspersky online account. The next tab over is News, which contains information such as version-update documentation. This screen is organized in a well-thought-out manner, presenting the most user-relevant information up front and putting lesser stuff near the back.

Installation and support

After purchasing Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac, you install the utility by downloading a small installer file that downloads and installs the whole package. All steps included, it took us approximately 5 minutes to complete the process, which is within the normal, 2-to-10-minute range we saw with Mac antivirus applications.

During the installation process, you can opt out of the Kaspersky Security Network, which collects usage and suspicious-file data for 400 million systems running Kaspersky software. Near the end of the installation, you’ll be directed to the Security & Privacy pane in System Preferences, as system access needs to be explicitly granted in macOS.

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To access technical support, click Help in the menu bar, select Kaspersky Internet Security Support, click My Kaspersky, click Support, click Request Technical Support and log in to My Kaspersky.

Bottom line

With a robust package of special features and an excellent history of malware detection, Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac is one of the best options around. Yet, while Kaspersky provides an especially compelling option for those looking to exert parental controls, we have to give the final nod overall to Bitdefender Antivirus for Mac, which has similarly good malware protection but half the system impact during scans as Kaspersky.

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Russian Cybersecurity Firm Kaspersky to Set Up Data Transparency Centre in India

Russia-based cybersecurity firm Kaspersky is planning to set up a data … voluntarily with the Kaspersky Security Network, together with our software …

Russia-based cybersecurity firm Kaspersky is planning to set up a data transparency centre in India, a senior company official has said.

Kaspersky Managing Director (Asia-Pacific) Stephan Neumeier made the remarks while replying to a question on the company’s future investment plan with respect to India.

“India is no doubt a key market for us. The country will be releasing a policy on cybersecurity. Kaspersky will first study the policy and accordingly will plan to set up transparency centre in India,” he said in an interview here.

The MD, however, did not disclose the investment amount for the project.

The centre in India will be Kaspersky’s second in the Asia Pacific region and fourth in the world after the ones in Switzerland, Spain and Malaysia.

The company recently opened its first transparency centre in the APAC region in Malaysia.

“The transparency centres in Switzerland and Spain serve as a facility for trusted partners and government stakeholders to review the company’s code, software updates, and threat detection rules. In addition, the storage and processing of user data from some regions, shared voluntarily with the Kaspersky Security Network, together with our software development infrastructure will all be relocated from Russia to Switzerland,” Kaspersky said explaining the function of a transparency centre.

India will be releasing a cybersecurity strategy policy in January next year.

While noting that the global health and pharmaceutical industry is facing threat of data breach, Neumeier further said his company is in talks with few top hospitals in South India to provide cyber security protection to them.

He also said that in India, Kaspersky has emerged as a strong alternative to the western players and is among the top cybersecurity providers in the consumer market in India.

Neumeier had last year said India has the potential to become the top market in terms of mobile consumers in the APAC region in next 5-10 years, driven by a sharp increase in usage of handsets and tablets and there is a need for raising awareness about cybersecurity among younger generation. PTI ABI ABI

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Kaspersky plans to set up data transparency centre in India

Kaspersky plans to set up data transparency centre in India … voluntarily with the Kaspersky Security Network, together with our software development …
By Abhishek Sonkar

Yangon (Myanmar), Sep 9 Russia-based cybersecurity firm Kaspersky is planning to set up a data transparency centre in India, a senior company official has said.

Kaspersky Managing Director (Asia-Pacific) Stephan Neumeier made the remarks while replying to a question on the company”s future investment plan with respect to India.

“India is no doubt a key market for us. The country will be releasing a policy on cybersecurity. Kaspersky will first study the policy and accordingly will plan to set up transparency centre in India,” he said in an interview here.

The MD, however, did not disclose the investment amount for the project.

The centre in India will be Kaspersky”s second in the Asia Pacific region and fourth in the world after the ones in Switzerland, Spain and Malaysia.

The company recently opened its first transparency centre in the APAC region in Malaysia.

“The transparency centres in Switzerland and Spain serve as a facility for trusted partners and government stakeholders to review the company”s code, software updates, and threat detection rules. In addition, the storage and processing of user data from some regions, shared voluntarily with the Kaspersky Security Network, together with our software development infrastructure will all be relocated from Russia to Switzerland,” Kaspersky said explaining the function of a transparency centre.

India will be releasing a cybersecurity strategy policy in January next year.

While noting that the global health and pharmaceutical industry is facing threat of data breach, Neumeier further said his company is in talks with few top hospitals in South India to provide cyber security protection to them.

He also said that in India, Kaspersky has emerged as a strong alternative to the western players and is among the top cybersecurity providers in the consumer market in India.

Neumeier had last year said India has the potential to become the top market in terms of mobile consumers in the APAC region in next 5-10 years, driven by a sharp increase in usage of handsets and tablets and there is a need for raising awareness about cybersecurity among younger generation. ABI ABI ANUANU


Disclaimer :- This story has not been edited by Outlook staff and is auto-generated from news agency feeds.


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Kaspersky to set up data centre in India

Anti-virus software company Kaspersky will set up a data centre and a … Kaspersky’s India data centre will meet the likely cyber security policy that will …

Anti-virus software company Kaspersky will set up a data centre and a transparency centre in India.

Russia-based Kaspersky is currently facing spying allegations in several European markets and United States.

Kaspersky’s India data centre will meet the likely cyber security policy that will mandate firms to store and process data locally.

“We will study the policy and will plan the data centre accordingly. The proposed centre will be on the lines of the one it set up in Zurich (Switzerland),” Stephan Neumeier, managing director of Kaspersky (Asia Pacific), said.

Kaspersky has already set up Asia Pacific’s first Transparency centre in Kaula Lumpur, Malayasia.

“But the upcoming Indian policy on cyber security would require us to invest on a facility to store and process the data that we generate locally,” said.

The centre in Asia Pacific is the third for Kaspersky after Zurich and Madrid. The proposed centre will help Kaspersky’s clients to see the source code and have a look at its products, software updates and threat detection rules.

Kaspersky claims it’s a number two cyber security provider in the consumer market in India, is among the top-4 players in the business-to-business segment and number 3 in the small and medium sector space.

The share of consumer business reached about 50 percent in South Asia about 70 percent three years ago.

Kaspersky Lab earlier said it plans to open a data center in Switzerland to address Western government concerns that Russia exploits its anti-virus software to spy on customers.

Kaspersky Lab said part of the new facility would be based in Zurich, and the company had chosen Switzerland for its “policy of neutrality” and strong data protection laws.

The United States last year ordered civilian government agencies to remove Kaspersky PC software from their networks. Kaspersky has strongly rejected the accusations and filed a lawsuit against the U.S. ban.

Kaspersky Lab said it also plans to open similar centers in North America and Asia by 2020.

Western security officials say Russia’s FSB Federal Security Service, successor to the Soviet-era KGB, exerts influence over Kaspersky management decisions, though the company has repeatedly denied those allegations.

2,000 MSPs have joined the ecosystem across North and Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa, with the highest number of partners registering in Europe.

“This recent update to our MSP Partner Program is part of a larger improvement plan focused on existing and new partners, their profitability, business needs and access to tools and security solutions,” said Ivan Bulaev, head of Global Channel at Kaspersky.

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